#1
I got myself a metronome, but my question is how to apply it to learning a solo

Mastodon- Blood and Thunder

e|---------------------------------12-|-----------------------------12---12-|
B|12-13-12h13p12----12----12-13-15----|12-13-12h13p12--12--12-13-15----15---|
G|---------------14----14-------------|--------------14--14-----------------|
D|------------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
A|------------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
E|------------------------------------|-------------------------------------|


Now, do i play 2 notes per click? what about the hammer-ons and pull offs?

Regards,
#2
You would probably set the metronome to a speed where you can comfortably play that solo with one note per click. You gradually increase the speed of the metronome until you reach the speed the solo is played at. So one note per click.
WTLTL 2011
#3
its nto a case of doing 2 notes per click
its one beat per click
you could do with proper sheet music to work out how many notes are assigned to each beat
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#4
its hard to play solos with metronomes, unless they are very modular. Regular notes would be one click, held notes would be two, and a hammer-on is a half-note, meaning one note every half-click. Metronomes are much easier practiced with if u have sheet music. And not too much by them is just straight eighth or sixteenth notes. Thats not a very easy solo speed-wise, but is very simplistic. so if u can get the notes down at a steady pace, just keep trying to play it faster until u get it at that speed.
Last edited by qotsa1998 at Sep 17, 2007,
#5
I just listened to the song on youtube. The beginning of the song is in 4/4 time, but for the solo you have here it alternates between 5/8 (5 beats per measure, eighth note gets the beat) and 6/8 (6 beats per measure, eighth note gets the beat).

e|--------------------------------12-|--------------------------------12----12-|
B|12-13-12h13p12---12----12-13-15----|12-13-12h13p12----12----12-13-15----15---|
G|--------------14----14-------------|---------------14----14------------------|
D|-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------------|
A|-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------------|
E|-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------------|
x *     *          *     *     *     |*     *           *     *     *     *    |
y 1  &  2       &  3  &  4  &  5  &  |1  &  2        &  3  &  4  &  5  &  6  &
        triplet                             triplet
z 1  &  2  e  & a  3  &  4  &  5  &  |1  &  2  e  &  a  3  &  4  &  5  &  6  &

This is the problem with tab, the spacing usually isn't accurate for the beats. I've added some info at the bottom. Set the metronome to beat on the * in line x. Now practice counting along with line y. You actually say "one and two and three and..." so that you say the numbers on the beats. You say the "and" to give a sense of the spacing.

However, the hammeron/pulloff is a triplet. Counting out triplets is usually done as "one E and uh two E and uh three..." where the beats fall on the numbers again. So now you should understand row z.

Also, I would avoid setting the metronome so fast that you're playing one note per click on anything other than a slow part. Unfortunately its a little difficult to slow down the metronome beyond what i have up there due to the changing time signature.
Last edited by black_box at Sep 17, 2007,
#6
^Where around Chicago are you from? I think I have a Blackbox EP, if your name refers to the band
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Quote by utsapp89
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#8
Geneva for me.

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Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.