#1
what would be a good set up for the reverb and delay effects on audacity, for vocals, yeah i know theres an audacity thread, but i didnt see anything in it, and i prolly wont get answered.
#2
Not get answered? tut tut.

Oh ye of little faith.

I'm gonna get a video camera in a couple of weeks and make some tutortial; vids for youtube.

With both, the best bet is to duplicate the vocal track you want to embellish, copy the original wave date, create a new track, click it, press home and copy it with ctrl+v.

Then you apply the settings to the duplicate, and blend the two to the desired wetness/dryness. Think of it as a fine tuning of sorts. This also negates the reason to play around with the settings, because you essentially have an override fader that you can fine tune with.

In layman's terms, in GVerb, roomsize will be your master control for depth. The default setting (75.750000) is rather wet, so most people would want to bring this down to at least half (35) or my preference, 25.

This works in tandem with the below setting, reverb time. GVerb is very heavy and foggy for a reverb plugin, and reverb time will help elleviate this claustrophobic noise.

In terms of setting depth, these are the two controls you need to worry about, I've found that they're the main two faders in terms of setting depth and time.

That's pretty much all there is too it, it's not the most responsive plugin in the world. It's in some ways the early solid state transistor amp of plugins

Delay wise, it's the same principle. My favourite of these is the "Delay" of the expansion pack, because it's simple. Delayorama, for instance, is a very contrived attempt at emulating a tape delay.

"Delay" has three settings.

"Decay Amount" - the higher this setting, the quicker the delays will "fade out". The default setting won't fade out delays for a couple of seconds. The overall depth of the delay decreases as decay amount increases

"Delay Time" simply sets the time interval at which a repeated note will occur. The default setting is 500ms, which is about right for most people. The overall depth of delay increases as delay time increases.

"Number of echoes" simply sets how many times the waveform will echo, up to the point of decaying into inaudibility. The default is 5, but for vocals, I like to set this to 3, keeping the other two functions at default.

And that's it.
#3
Yeah, in terms of the audacity thread, I have been meaning to condense it, rewrite things that weren't clear and incorporate repeated questions into the FAQ.

I'll do some work on it in a moment, but I've been busy lately.

Please bear in mind that it's a very hard program to write a guide for, because there are millions of glitches and problems that have a tiny chance of occuring, and there's no way that I can possibly document them all.
#4
Quote by FreeManson15
what would be a good set up for the reverb and delay effects on audacity, for vocals, yeah i know theres an audacity thread, but i didnt see anything in it, and i prolly wont get answered.


For lead vocals stay away from reverb and go fro a tempo-based delay (if available, if not just do some math).

Quote by BrianApocalypse
With both, the best bet is to duplicate the vocal track you want to embellish, copy the original wave date, create a new track, click it, press home and copy it with ctrl+v.

Then you apply the settings to the duplicate, and blend the two to the desired wetness/dryness. Think of it as a fine tuning of sorts. This also negates the reason to play around with the settings, because you essentially have an override fader that you can fine tune with.


Won't this lead to phase cancellation issues? And is there no way in Audacity to use bussing/sends?
#5
^ nope.

In the same way that if you completely duplicate a track down to the closest sub-nanosecond, it'll simply be twice as loud!

I've not found any way as of yet to do sends and returns, and as such, this is the bets way I know to emulate them.