#1
I want to slow down my vibrato and make it wider, but I'm having trouble controlling it (especially when bending). Any sugestions or exercises?
#2
What do you mean when you say trouble? Are you unable to bend the string well? Are you having trouble making it even?
#3
My best advice is to deliberately be precise with your vibrato. Never, NEVER think of it as "just randomly shaking the string", because it's not. It's a way of playing a note. Tap your foot and on every tap, bend up and down. Up, down, up down, up down in eighth notes. Listen to players with good vibrato. Dimebag Darrel, Zakk Wylde, Yngwie Malmsteen, Joe Satriani, Becker, Marty Friedman (personal favorite), lots of them and try to replicate the expressive nature of their vibrato. Remember to always have a precise plan when you go to use vibrato on a note. Never just randomly shake it, think in your head "How can I make this note say what I want it to say?". Sometimes just one or two shakes done perfectly can be more expressive than quick shrill vibrato.

One of my favorite things to do is play a note, then play a note a whole step above. Then, play the note between and push it right up to the previous note.

---10---12---11b12~~~~ and shake it back as if you are trying to play both notes at once.
Last edited by CowboyUp at Sep 17, 2007,
#5
Quote by CowboyUp
My best advice is to deliberately be precise with your vibrato. Never, NEVER think of it as "just randomly shaking the string", because it's not. It's a way of playing a note. Tap your foot and on every tap, bend up and down. Up, down, up down, up down in eighth notes. Listen to players with good vibrato. Dimebag Darrel, Zakk Wylde, Yngwie Malmsteen, Joe Satriani, Becker, Marty Friedman (personal favorite), lots of them and try to replicate the expressive nature of their vibrato. Remember to always have a precise plan when you go to use vibrato on a note. Never just randomly shake it, think in your head "How can I make this note say what I want it to say?". Sometimes just one or two shakes done perfectly can be more expressive than quick shrill vibrato.

One of my favorite things to do is play a note, then play a note a whole step above. Then, play the note between and push it right up to the previous note.

---10---12---11b12~~~~ and shake it back as if you are trying to play both notes at once.


I never think about my vibrato, I just let it happen naturally. If I think about it, it ends up sounding contrived or forced.

As far as practicing vibrato, I would suggest learning solos by people that have a vibrato style that your after. By imitating them, you are likely to pick up what they are doing, and it will naturally become a part of your own playing. (this goes for any technique really)
#6
Quote by GuitarMunky
I never think about my vibrato, I just let it happen naturally. If I think about it, it ends up sounding contrived or forced.

As far as practicing vibrato, I would suggest learning solos by people that have a vibrato style that your after. By imitating them, you are likely to pick up what they are doing, and it will naturally become a part of your own playing. (this goes for any technique really)


You should put just as much effort into your vibrato as you do into any other part of playing. I didn't mean "plan it out" in any special way, just like you would if you were improvising.
#7
Quote by CowboyUp
You should put just as much effort into your vibrato as you do into any other part of playing.


I dont disagree with this. I think spending time practicing any technique is good.

I think the only thing I really disagreed with (or maybe misunderstood) in your post was the idea that you should have a "precise plan" any time you vibrato. and that it should never be random.

When i'm improvising, I dont want to be thinking in depth about any precise plan. I just want to play and "let" it happen. In a sense it is random..... but I have controll over what im doing and would consider it spontaneous more than random. Even in a planned out solo, I find that vibrato just happens naturally based on the feel of the solo.

Vibrato doesnt have to necesarrily be an exact note value, it certainly can be, but alot of great vibrato is random, and felt rather than counted.

Anyway your ideas and suggestions are good. Especially the part about trying to replicate the expressive nature of players with good vibrato.
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
I dont disagree with this. I think spending time practicing any technique is good.

I think the only thing I really disagreed with (or maybe misunderstood) in your post was the idea that you should have a "precise plan" any time you vibrato. and that it should never be random.

When i'm improvising, I dont want to be thinking in depth about any precise plan. I just want to play and "let" it happen. In a sense it is random..... but I have controll over what im doing and would consider it spontaneous more than random. Even in a planned out solo, I find that vibrato just happens naturally based on the feel of the solo.

Vibrato doesnt have to necesarrily be an exact note value, it certainly can be, but alot of great vibrato is random, and felt rather than counted.

Anyway your ideas and suggestions are good. Especially the part about trying to replicate the expressive nature of players with good vibrato.



You say it is "random", and that you don't think ahead, but you do, whether or not you realize it. I don't see how you can just completely not pay attention and have the string start vibrating.

"Happens naturally" is just a fancy way of saying "A note comes up and I think of a good way to shake it so it goes well with the song".
#9
Quote by CowboyUp
You say it is "random", and that you don't think ahead, but you do, whether or not you realize it. I don't see how you can just completely not pay attention and have the string start vibrating.

"Happens naturally" is just a fancy way of saying "A note comes up and I think of a good way to shake it so it goes well with the song".



Happens naturally in this case refers to reacting to a situation. When you react to something you dont make precise plans.... you react.
To me techniques are tools that we use as we react. If we have practiced certain techniques (vibrato included) and are proficient at them, then when its time to react... we have those tools at our disposal and dont really have to think about them consciously. (most cases...their are always exceptions)

To add to this point I have to say that music, for me anyway, is emotional.

(wiki)
"Emotion, in its most general definition, is a complex psychophysical process that arises spontaneously, rather than through conscious effort........"

This emotion is what fuels my vibrato, and playing in general.

When you say think, I take that to mean consious thought, especially when you say "precise planning". That generally doesn't happen in my case (for vibrato). For me vibrato is generally something I just do, again as an emotional reaction, to whats happening musically.

I suppose that "precise planning" in my case = practicing.
then when its time to react, that planning becomes another tool in the tool box.


Anyway I didnt mean to offend you, I just have a different point of view and thought it was worth adding to the thread.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 18, 2007,
#10
Quote by GuitarMunky
Happens naturally in this case refers to reacting to a situation. When you react to something you dont make precise plans.... you react.
To me techniques are tools that we use as we react. If we have practiced certain techniques (vibrato included) and are proficient at them, then when its time to react... we have those tools at our disposal and dont really have to think about them consciously. (most cases...their are always exceptions)

To add to this point I have to say that music, for me anyway, is emotional.

(wiki)
"Emotion, in its most general definition, is a complex psychophysical process that arises spontaneously, rather than through conscious effort........"

This emotion is what fuels my vibrato, and playing in general.

When you say think, I take that to mean consious thought, especially when you say "precise planning". That generally doesn't happen in my case (for vibrato). For me vibrato is generally something I just do, again as an emotional reaction, to whats happening musically.

I suppose that "precise planning" in my case = practicing.
then when its time to react, that planning becomes another tool in the tool box.


Anyway I didnt mean to offend you, I just have a different point of view and thought it was worth adding to the thread.


Oh no, don't worry about it

As far as I can tell we were just saying the same thing in different ways. Either way, you seem to know about vibrato, whether you describe it in a similar fashion or not.
#12
Yea. What exactly are these circle vibratos? I've read about on Vai's site, but I didn't really understand them. I mean, how exactly do you do that circular motion? And how does it really differ from the standard vibrato?
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