#1
What is the best way to practice soloing when you don't have a backing track or another guitarist playing with you? I can't ever seem to get a good melody going, i'm just running up and down scales boring myself..
#3
It's always going to be difficult because the underlying chords are what give your lead playing context. Without them the tonality is always going to be a bit up in the air which means it never sounds as good, and also if you're trying to create something you have no chords to work around.

Myadvice is just to get a load of backing tracks from guitarbt.com, without backing chords you've got no guideline to help you choose where to go so you invariably come up with the same old stuff.
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#4
Paul Gilbert has a neat trick where he play's a short rhythm and then leave the same amount of empty space (or double if you choose) to solo over but to that tempo and key. So for example he'll play a rock based riff in A then rip through some A Minor Pentatonic licks in time to the rhythm he just played. This is great because you start to base you lead licks on the rhythm and it still put the focus on playing in time.
#5
I tried sticking down the keys on a keyboard with masking tape and a synth sound (which doesn't decay), to make different chords to practice over. I find this is a good way to practice using a particular scale, because if gives you an unlimited amount of time to hear how each note sounds in the context of a chord.

Jamming along to songs/backing tracks is better practice for actual soloing though, because they have chord changes and melodic and rhythmic ideas you can copy/adapt.
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Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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#7
You could use an old-school tracker (fasttracker? modplug, etc.) to make yourself backing tracks.
That's what I do.

I use Buzz.
#10
i use audicity to multi track and solos can still be intresting by them selves some times u only use one gutiarist... what i do is i play similar to a rythem guitarist (but more fancy) and than for a breakdown half way through the song il play a quick solo usually using apreggios so that it still fits the previous melody well also yr solos should be fancy enough to sound fine by them selves right, i mean no matter what its gonna sound more awsum with a second guitarist but u gotta make it fun add some pull offs or hammer ons some bends and slides work the high notes u know:P even throwing bar chords can make the solo that much more awsum... furthermore if u can u can do sweep picking or two handed tapping which almost sounds like rythem and lead at the same time (especially two handed tapping if u do it well)
#11
Quote by adave
Paul Gilbert has a neat trick where he play's a short rhythm and then leave the same amount of empty space (or double if you choose) to solo over but to that tempo and key. So for example he'll play a rock based riff in A then rip through some A Minor Pentatonic licks in time to the rhythm he just played. This is great because you start to base you lead licks on the rhythm and it still put the focus on playing in time.


This...

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^ +1

i turn on the radio, pick a random station and go.


...and this is quite fun.

When I try to solo without music I just create a rhythmic pattern in which I can follow to my own beat. It really isnt fun just going up and down scales with nothing to follow, so just get a metronome and follow certain bpm's to your liking.
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#12
=>Play the backing track yourself over and over.
=>While you do this, imagine the solo construction.
=>Memorize your ideas.
=>You have the solo

This always works. In this way you can create licks or melodies, that you'd never come up with while scratching your bals running down-up the same scales.

Good Luck
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#13
Quote by SdKfz
while scratching your bals running down-up the same scales.


You must be better than malmsteen so be able to both at the same time

Also, if your using backing tracks and don't have a good ear, make sure you name them appropriately, I spent 50 mins once trying to work out why the minor pentatonic didn't work over what I thought was a track in Am.
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#14
The problem is that some patterns are been overused by him so he plays them again and again.
The playing itself causes this problem, since he is just improvising.
It is better to figure out entire measures of soloing by mind, because the mind is not stucked on patterns, but can compose something.
=>Fender Highway 1 Stratocaster with Alnico V Holydiver Bare Knuckle bridge humbucker

=>40 Watt RMS Yorkville Traynor YCV-40 valve amplifier

=>30 Watt Tech 21 NYC - Trademark 30 solid amplifier

=>Dunlop GCB-95 Crybaby pedal