#1
I try to write songs, mainly love songs, but I can't finish them.

I write out a line, then I look at it and I can find upwards of 10 variations of saying the exact same thing, but with different words. Then after I list them all, I can't choose which one I like more because they all mean the same thing.

Some songs rhyme, some don't, I try not to rhyme my songs due to the fact that the words I want to say rarely ever rhyme, but then if I don't have a set 'structure' to follow, such as rhyming words, the song ends up going out of control.

It'll get way too long, the verses and lines will never end up having anywhre near the same ammount of syllables as each other which is a real pain in the ass, and the lyrics seem to vary greatly between love and hate and whatever else might be floating around in my head at the time of writing.

I mean how many ways can you tell someone you love them?

Sorry if I seem to be ranting on, but I'm just wondering if other people have the same or a similar problem? Thanks.
#2
who cares if the song gets too long? as long as youre not repeating yourself over and over again, thats fine.
#3
I try not to repeat myself, that isn't really the problem. It's more that I can't seem to find just 1 way of saying something, I end up with countless ways of saying it, then not being able to decide on which one sounds better and/or more fitting to the song.
#4
Quote by pAmpH
I try not to repeat myself, that isn't really the problem. It's more that I can't seem to find just 1 way of saying something, I end up with countless ways of saying it, then not being able to decide on which one sounds better and/or more fitting to the song.


toss out an example and ill help you choose one and tell you why... maybe then you can apply that kind of thinking to your own writing? just a thought
#5
Ok, say for example I was going to write: 'You're there in my head and I can't let you go', I could change it to:

* You're in my head and I don't want to let you go,
* You're in my head but I can't let you go,
* I don't want to let you out of my head just yet,
* I can't let go cause you're still in my head,
* etc...

They all pretty much mean the same thing, and words like head could be changed ti 'mind' or 'thoughts' or 'brain' or anything else along those lines as well, making even more possibilities.

To help you out, basically I'm trying to say that I can't let her go because I'm still thinking of her. I'd really appreciate your thoughts and suggestions, thanks.
#6
So the problem you have is that you write a line, then think of better/different ways of writing it down. What you should do first is to write the different ways of writing that line separately, finish the rest of the song, then come back to that line and try and find the one which works best. If the line is in the chorus, you have more freedom in changing the wording slightly.

Rhyming doesn't often matter in songwriting; rhythm does however. When you're writing a song, if you find a line has a rhythm/beat you like, incorporate that beat into the other lines, even if that means rewriting some of the lines. Although many songs rhyme, not rhyming allows for a greater freedom of words and you aren't held back by trying to find a word to rhyme with (forced rhyming).

As for the love/hate thing, when you write about love, you'll invariably think about pain as well, it's part and parcel with it.
#7
I had the same problem.
The thing is that it doesn't matter. It doesn't matter because there are no barriers in our musical world anymore, there is no more tonality, no more asthetic guidelines, everything just comes down to the listener, who is biased by his culture and thus picking the meaning up differently from other listeners. There are infinite possibilities here, so it doesn't matter which you pick.
^ seconded.

Äh, Sie wollen also mit Schlitz.
#8
god just do what i do and whenever you get an idea, phrase right it down because one way or another it will connect
#10
Quote by pAmpH
Ok, say for example I was going to write: 'You're there in my head and I can't let you go', I could change it to:

* You're in my head and I don't want to let you go,
* You're in my head but I can't let you go,
* I don't want to let you out of my head just yet,
* I can't let go cause you're still in my head,
* etc...

They all pretty much mean the same thing, and words like head could be changed ti 'mind' or 'thoughts' or 'brain' or anything else along those lines as well, making even more possibilities.

To help you out, basically I'm trying to say that I can't let her go because I'm still thinking of her. I'd really appreciate your thoughts and suggestions, thanks.


the three things i'd say are

1) those sentences all mean different things. think more about the subtleties of what you're saying. be more exact. this will push you towards one particular line more.

2) try and use structure. force yourself to write in iambic pentameter or something, or force yourself to follow a rhyme scheme. it might not be something you'll do regularly, and the results of it might not be great, but at the least it'll be a useful exercise.

3) think more about your structure, about the logical progression of what you're saying. think about what you want to say in each stanza, and say it in the most succint yet evocative way you can. write what you want to say, and nothing more.
my name is matt. you can call me that if you like.
#11
Quote by pAmpH
Ok, say for example I was going to write: 'You're there in my head and I can't let you go', I could change it to:

* You're in my head and I don't want to let you go,
* You're in my head but I can't let you go,
* I don't want to let you out of my head just yet,
* I can't let go cause you're still in my head,
* etc...

They all pretty much mean the same thing, and words like head could be changed ti 'mind' or 'thoughts' or 'brain' or anything else along those lines as well, making even more possibilities.

To help you out, basically I'm trying to say that I can't let her go because I'm still thinking of her. I'd really appreciate your thoughts and suggestions, thanks.


Quote by Dæmönika
Rhyming doesn't often matter in songwriting; rhythm does however. When you're writing a song, if you find a line has a rhythm/beat you like, incorporate that beat into the other lines, even if that means rewriting some of the lines. Although many songs rhyme, not rhyming allows for a greater freedom of words and you aren't held back by trying to find a word to rhyme with (forced rhyming).


i agree. some form of structure makes things a lot easier, but always be aware that you dont HAVE to have a perfect structure all the time.. you can break it, if you want to. also, the freedom of not rhyming is great, while rhyming allows for the listener to recall the lines much more easily, so its pretty common to hear rhyming in, for example, the chorus of a song... because it captures the listener, and essentially they automatically remember that rhyme, thus remembering your song (hopefully enjoying it), which is ideal if your goal is to sell lots of records.

Quote by Gurgle!Argh!
1) those sentences all mean different things. think more about the subtleties of what you're saying. be more exact. this will push you towards one particular line more.


i agree with that as well. the more specific, the more limited your wording. also think about whether you're trying to be subtle, or blatant. it really makes a difference what your intended delivery is.

"* You're in my head but [id change that to and] I can't let you go" was the first one that jumped out at me as an easy one to fit into a song, because of the fact that its really easy to break up rhythmically. its not that its a better line or anything in this instance (again, think about what your intentions/specific meanings are when choosing a line), but rhythmically i found it easiest to put to a melody. also, if you ever find a line that you like a LOT, but its short a syllable or so (or a slight bit too long), remember you can always just eliminate unnecessary words, or add some.... sometimes youll end up adding a whole other line.

just some things to think about.... basically:

- don't be stuck in the rhyming cage
- consider structure and rhythm
- focus on your intentions/specific meaning/message
- dont be afraid to cut out or add words

also try not to stress about what line to pick. in fact, i would say that maybe you should just refrain from writing the same line over and over again. write it once, and if you arent satisfied, tweak it... or if you decide to write it out over and over again with different wordings, dont be afraid to pick one and run with it!