#1
I'm reading a book by John Meagan on Tonic and Rhythmic Fundamentals, and specifically their application in jazz music, and in the first chapter it talks about how there are 2 types of diatonic harmony - vertical and horizontal.

the first figure is of the c major scale, and it shows the first 7 notes, spanning one octave (C-D-E-F-G-A-B) and calls it "horizontal diatonic harmony". In the second figure, there are still only 7 notes, but they go C-E-G-B-D-F-A, and then the octave C, which is two octaves higher than the root.

However, in both examples, the notes are labelled as degrees I through VII, but I don't understand how this can be. That would mean that the 4th degree of the first example is an F, while the 4th degree of the second example is a B. How can a scale have two of every degree?

Also, does horizontal diatonic harmony have a 9th, 11th, and 13th? I wonder because with the example of vertical dh, there is a space between each note where (I assume) the second, perfect 4th, etc, would go. Does this mean that in horizontal dh, the seconds, fourths, 6ths, etc are incidentals?

Oh, and on a side note, how can there be 7 scale tone 7th chords in one scale? If a 7th is made up of the root, third, perfect fifth, and seventh, doesn't that mean that in a scale, you can only have one? Again, according to the book, a grouping of the fifth, the seventh, the ninth, and the eleventh also creates a seventh chord.

Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#2
Hm, I think I understand it...

Horizontal would be the 7 chords you can form diatonically from the scale, so to use
the key of C and triads as an example that would be:

Cmaj
Dmin
Emin
Fmaj
Gmaj
Amin
Bdim

That's the 7 chords in the family.

Vertical, is you take each of those chords and extend it -- by adding thirds to
each triad you can extend it over 2 octaves and eventually use all the notes in
the scale. So, you would do that with each of the above. For example I'll use C
extended vertically:

C
Cmajor dyad
Cmajor triad
Cmaj7
Cmaj9
Cmaj11
Cmaj13

Then you'd go on to D (which would be a minor flavor).

Vertically means to extend one chord in 3rds.

Quote by Instrumetal

Oh, and on a side note, how can there be 7 scale tone 7th chords in one scale? If a 7th is made up of the root, third, perfect fifth, and seventh, doesn't that mean that in a scale, you can only have one? Again, according to the book, a grouping of the fifth, the seventh, the ninth, and the eleventh also creates a seventh chord.




That's the horizontal part. Successively use each note in the scale as the root
of the chord. Then harmonize it by adding 3rds from the scale. That will give you
7 different harmonized 7th (and beyond) chord types.
Last edited by edg at Sep 18, 2007,
#3
Quote by edg
Hm, I think I understand it...

Horizontal would be the 7 chords you can form diatonically from the scale, so to use
the key of C and triads as an example that would be:

Cmaj
Dmin
Emin
Fmaj
Gmaj
Amin
Bdim

That's the 7 chords in the family.


Is it that order of majors and minors no matter what the root?
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#4
Quote by Instrumetal
Is it that order of majors and minors no matter what the root?


Yes, if you're in a major key.
#5
So in the key of C, you can't have a Dmaj?
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#7
What does "diatonic" imply?
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#8
Within the scale.

That's obviously not to say that you can't use a D major chord though. There is a theoretical explanation to that as well.