#1
hey i always here about pple saying u gotta break the rules of theory i was wondering if any one could tell me when they think it is acceptable to break those rules and not make it sound like **** if u have a second guitarist
#3
i know my basic theory and all but i mean if yr playing with a second guitarist and u go out of key for 1 note or something should yr rythem do the same
#5
Not necessarily. When you break the rules of theory you tend to be playing more what sounds good. Use your ear. If it's the sound your goin' for, use it.
#7
Quote by natedapunk
hey i always here about pple saying u gotta break the rules of theory i was wondering if any one could tell me when they think it is acceptable to break those rules and not make it sound like **** if u have a second guitarist

Are you asking for a rule for breaking the rules?

One word: Experiment.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#9
i know my basic theory and all but i mean if yr playing with a second guitarist and u go out of key for 1 note or something should yr rythem do the same


Absolutely not. Playing out of key notes are fine, there is nothing non-theoretical about that, in fact theory can explain most things that you'll encounter in music. If the "out of key" note is just a passing or neighbor tone things are just fine, and even if it's not, you can analyze the chord as an alt chord depending on where the dissonant tone resolves. There is a LOT more to theory than just chord/scale theory, and I suggest you start learning it.
#10
I don't understand how you can escape theory, really. I mean if you were soloing in E minor, and you played a G#, that would be a 3rd, which although not in that scale would still be in music theory.
#11
Quote by Spamwise
I don't understand how you can escape theory, really. I mean if you were soloing in E minor, and you played a G#, that would be a 3rd, which although not in that scale would still be in music theory.


But, not in the scale thus sounding dissonant.

Just do what everyone else is saying, especially EXPERIMENTING. That's the important one.
#12
I don't see how it's breaking the rules out going outside of theory though. You can play a note that's diatonic and have a dissonant sound.
#13
I know, he knows just enough to get by. I'm pretty sure what he is talking about is using notes out of the scale while his backup guitarist plays chords in scale in the background. The key thing is to just try it.
#14
ok strat man yah that is what im talking about u were saying there is other theory i should learn other than chords and scales, i was wondering what other important theory there is ?