#1
I have a lot of cables that I inherited from my uncle. They are all standard guitar cables, but they are all like over 4 or 5 feet each. Pretty soon I am gonna have like 3 pedals hooked up to my half stack, but I dont have any short cables. I have heard that you dont want long cables connecting all of your pedals, because it can hurt your tone, is this correct?

I was thinking of maybe shortening the cables myself, is this possible? I have never done something like this before, maybe someone can walk me through how to do this. Your help would be greatly appreciated!
#2
You can do it yourself, but it may be harder with certain cables. Post pics of the ends of the cables, and we'll tell you if it's worth it.
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#3
buy some 90 degree jacks and soldier them to those cables or use the ends you have and shorten them then soldier them. its not that difficult.
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#4
This is what they all basically look like, standard straight, nothing fancy or really different about them.
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#6
Quote by Shard Heilia
Go out and buy a package of little patch cables? >_>



Well Im kinda broke right now otherwise I would. I figured since I have like 10-15 long cables I could shorten a few of them for really cheap.
#7
Quote by lucas_22
buy some 90 degree jacks and soldier them to those cables or use the ends you have and shorten them then soldier them. its not that difficult.


Well I have never done something like this before, I have never even used a soldiering gun before, thats why I am asking if someone can walk me through how to do this.
#8
Quote by cbehrendt
This is what they all basically look like, standard straight, nothing fancy or really different about them.

It's going to be really easy, because of what types of ends you're using. Unscrew the casing, so you can see the insides. Observe. Notcie that it's realy 2 wires, inside the cable. Then, desolder those, snip the wire to desired length, then resolder, just how you saw it.
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#10
Quote by cbehrendt
How do you desolder them?

You hold your soldering iron on the joint until it melts, then run your soldering braid through it to pick up the excess solder, or just pull the wire off. If you're lazy, just snip it close to the joing with plyers.
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Quote by ratmblink123
Good for you. Have a cookie.


But really... there's no cookie. And if there was, you wouldn't get one.
#11
Quote by cbehrendt
I have a lot of cables that I inherited from my uncle. They are all standard guitar cables, but they are all like over 4 or 5 feet each. Pretty soon I am gonna have like 3 pedals hooked up to my half stack, but I dont have any short cables. I have heard that you dont want long cables connecting all of your pedals, because it can hurt your tone, is this correct?

I was thinking of maybe shortening the cables myself, is this possible? I have never done something like this before, maybe someone can walk me through how to do this. Your help would be greatly appreciated!


you could shorten them but i would just go and buy patch cables like these:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Live-Wire-14-Angle14-Angle-Patch-Cable?sku=330478

I use those and they are working great.
#12
Im lookin into just buying some patch cables, cheap ones. Is it true though that patching your pedals with long cables messes with the sound?
#13
The longer the signal path, the higher the capacitance. Capacitance, from the perspective of tone, reduces the treble response (or "presence" if you will) of the signal. Of course, turning the tone knob on the guitar will do the same thing as a tone knob is just a potentiometer connected to a capacitor. There are several ways to combat the problem:

1. Use really really really good cable. Exotic cables tend to have better shielding, lower capacitance, purer grades of copper, thicker solder joints, and high quality jacks on either end. The typical price point is about $100 USD for a 10 foot cable (depending on brand) and some of the more exotic cables go for a lot more.

2. Use a buffer. A buffer will change the signal impedance from high to low. Changing the signal impedance from high to low will reduce the rate of signal degradation over any given signal path. However the buffer will affect the tone slightly (and in a similar fashion) but for many with really long cable runs the trade off is worth it.

3. Use shorter cables. Naturally if you shorten the cable run, you will reduce the capacitance, presuming you are essentially using a shorter version of the same cable. For example, it would be wise to use a 1 foot Evidence HG in place of a 10 foot Evidence HG, but it would not be wise to use a 1 foot patch cable that the pawn shop included with the $15 distortion pedal they sold to your cousin last week in place of a 10 foot Evidence HG.

Remember that solder joints play a big part in the overall quality of the cable. It's recommended that you use solder with a high silver content and clean all applicable surfaces with a non-residue solvent before beginning work.
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#14
Well I went to radio shack and bought a couple of patch cables, I hope they are alright, considering they are from radio shack. Will these work fine or should I just bring those back and order a better brand?