#1
Well, this is going to be a bit weird. Bear with me here.

Basically, Ravi Shankar is one of my primary musical influences. For quite a while now, I've wanted to get a sort of sitar style to guitar developed, as I have no actual sitar. Found some stuff as to the scales and stuff so far......

Thing is, I haven't been able to find anything of what notes the strings of a sitar are tuned to. Obviously, Ravi's is a 7-string sitar and I can't match what he's doing without buying a 7-string guitar, but before his almost all sitars were six strings....


Basically, would anyone have any idea where I could find this sort of information? If it's someplace obvious and I've missed it, I apologize ahead of time.
#2
I think Eastern music is tuned in quarter steps, instead of half steps, or something. I thought I read that playing sitar music on a guitar would require new frets in between the existing ones or something.

..but then again, I could be wrong.
Quote by hug a llama
You put parentheses in parentheses. I...I...I think I love you.

Quote by Vos
THANK YOU! You're my hero!
#4
I heard about a 48 fret guitar, where you can play quarter tone

I know that Steve Vai has one, but I can't find any picture...
MY GEARS:
Ibanez S520EX
Fender American Stratocaster
Epiphone Les Paul w/ Killswitch
Fender 12-string Acoustic
Fender Champion300 (to be changed soon to a Tube Amp)
Ibanez TS-9 Overdrive pedal
Boss PW-10 pedal
#5
Well, I'm studying slide a bit as well, and that would work for notes in-between frets....
#6
if the sitar is indeed, like other ethnic instruments is tuned in quarter notes,
and youve got some cash and time to learn, closest you could get is a fretless guitar
keep in mind this does require a very good ear..
well.. all things considered you might aswell just by a sitar

otherwise, just try figuring out a tuning that is a chod lot used by the sitar, and has the right places for minor and major swithing.. i know absolutely nothing about the instruments tuning, so i can't think of anyone ..

ofcourse, liking the sitar is liking the sound, so even more efficient than finding a good tuning is getting a good row of effects, again quite expensive, but i'd surely consider..
(i think a compressor and a delay after this is crucial, but those 2 wouldn't get you there, and i can't think of a good addition right now..
1953 Epiphone zephyr
1988 PRS custom 24
1960 Moon oct. mandolin
#7
i dont think youll get what you want just by tuning your guitar differently...

yes, the sitar does use weird eastern tunings that have different intervals that the western ear likes..

and have you ever seen a sitar? they have movable frets, so you can adjust the tuning just right, or possibly another variation...

never played one myself, but i remember seein two frets that were about 3 fret spaces apart... and the guy slid into that area and bent the string in an insane way.. vibrato style while he hit intervals ive never heard.

also, the sitar has those extra stings that vibrate in harmony with what you play one the other strings... with out that youll never get that sitar feeling,


..ive seen a sitar-guitar in musicians friend before..go for that if anything (thats not a real sitar)
#8
I know about the electric sitar and such, and even how complex the actual sitar is......

All I'm really interested in is getting a different approach to guitar. What I've read is that the lower strings on the sitar are basically for additional drone sound, and the melody is played on the upper one or two strings (depending on the type). I was just interested in possibly applying that general principle to the guitar, to see what effect I could get out of it. That's why I was asking about the tuning. Anything to set myself apart from the rest, I suppose.


In any case, I do plan on soon getting a tambura, and then eventually a genuine sitar. For now, I just want an unusual guitar playing method.
#9
somebody on here was on mushrooms and wanted a sitar sound, so he tuned is strings to DDDDDD. He recorded a song, but you would have to find it. Just search forever young, and I think it is on the 1st page