#1
K guys,i just got my first electric guitar and i went to learn the simplest solo from the song Californiacation.Its really simple and that solo made me all crazy about solos.I love RHCP solos,thier slow simple,and really nice to listen to.But i don't seem to be able to write solos like thiers.People say that the pentatonic scale helps,but how do i use it? Do i take the notes out from the scale and fit them into a solo or just go with the rythm? can anyone explain how i can write the perfect solo that preferbly doesn;'t have a shredding speed. Thanks
#2
Pink Floyd solos are fitting quite well in your description of solos that you like. slow, simple, but makes you listen. Check out some guitar solos from Comfortably Numb, Time, or On an Island by David Gimour. I got hooked on that one.

As far as pentatonic scale takes you, check out some famous phrasings and how guitarists use them. Get some tabs to gutiar solos, see which key they fit in, and see what notes of the pentatonic scale they are using. they tend to use more than just 5 notes of the octave, but you can probably guess where they lie. Some use the major and minor pentatonic scales mixed to belt out a GREAT solo.
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#3
Harmonic notes on accented beats and non-harmonic notes in the scale on unaccented beats. Stepwise motion prevails, reach a climax then descend stepwise downward to the tonic. Those simple guidelines should keep you busy for now.
#4
Quote by yawn
Harmonic notes on accented beats and non-harmonic notes in the scale on unaccented beats. Stepwise motion prevails, reach a climax then descend stepwise downward to the tonic. Those simple guidelines should keep you busy for now.



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#5
just mess around mess around mess around until you stumble across a lick that you like. vary your notes in length and don't worry about hitting one per beat or 4 per beat or even on the beat at all. and have it play in your head, too. when i write/improvise, i generally have a melody in my head that's just a bit ahead of what i'm actually playing and i go off of that. and my mouth moves when i play, too. i kinda sing my solos out to myself, silently. which is kinda weird.
#6
you guys think just picking single notes from the scale and fitting them 2gether will work?
#7
^it does to a certain extent. but it wouldn't last long.
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#8
So basically i use the pentatonic scale as a template? just add in tricks and other funky notes and i got a solo?
#9
a noobish solo. yes. it's kinda hard to explain how to write solos... look for tutorials.
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#10
Quote by NoobOnZone
So basically i use the pentatonic scale as a template? just add in tricks and other funky notes and i got a solo?


Er..Yes...But with a bit more feeling than just 'adding tricks'.

It's best to use some kind of backing track where you know the key and what scales you can use for it - listen to it for a while and try to come up with some nice melodies in your head that could be played over it. Then try to recreate those on the fretboard, and just expand from within those melodies into a full blown solo.
#11
there isn't a formula you have to follow for writing solos.. You generally solo in the same keys in the song, I'm assuming you know basic scales and how to play in a certain key, right?
So you don't just "pick random 2 notes and stick them together". I mean you could do that but the solo would probably suck. Just look at some licks in other solos to get ideas and adapt them into your solo. Try to throw in some hammer ons and pull offs, and get creative. Bends and vibrato usually sound nice, if you put it in the right spots. What you will find in a lot of solos is quickly moving up the second octave of the scale and bending with your pinky on the high E, then slowly running back down the first octave. Or hammering and pulling off between two strings next to each other in a pattern, and slowly moving up or down the scale. It all works. Just get creative. And, to be honest, the califonication solo is probably one of the weakest "slow" solos. As mentioned, check out comfortably numb. That will leave you speachless. Also, the beginnning of Joe Satriani's "Starry Night" is slow, but incredible. Totally paints an image in your head. There's also the Layla outro, slow but incredible. I really don't like californiacations solo to be honest... I am a fan of slow solos, but that is just a mess in my opinion..
To each their own, though

So hopefully that helped you out a little, as far as writing solos goes.
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Last edited by PieceOfMind666 at Sep 19, 2007,
#12
What's a key,and how do I know in what key I am in?
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#13
Select some good guitarists or just guitarists you like and print a solo-tab from each of them. Ripp your ass off trying to understand WHY the notes are placed in this order and why each note lasts so long. If you see any anusual and catchy licks focus on them, instead of cheap fast pentatonic runs

Good Luck
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#14
Listen to a lot of solos and learnthem. That's the best way to start.
#15
But i'm not that good till i can actually tell you which fret gives you a certain pitch,i've only been playing a year,and bearly know electric guitar....and is writing songs easier den writing solos?
#16
Don't think about it like that.
Just get familiar with the fretboard. Learn the basic scales, minor and major and then try to learn some easy pentatonic licks. Always try to get something interesting from your playing
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#17
Search google video for Melodic Control by Marty Friedman, the shred-ness of some of the ideas may very well be out of your league but conceptually and from a musical point of view there are few better videos out there.
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#18
just give her sh it, that what i do ahha, and know a few scales helps here and there, but its mostly all about feel, just feel what your playing man,
#19
Quote by TwanBracco
That could be quite difficult when you're a beginner. In the beginning you're not playing what you 'feel', but what you are able to.

I would create a melody (in your head) and then try to play it on the guitar. Add some bends, slides hammer-ons, pull-offs, and add some notes here and there.


That's the secret. In order to create the melody in his head, he has to play the backing track the same time.
I've written a ballad solo and a metal solo this way and I'm pretty happy about them.
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#20
Quote by TwanBracco
Creating a melody in your head is far more easier because you don't have to think about frets and positions! Try it!


Only you totally do; if you come up with a melody in your head you're still going to need to transfer that to the guitar somehow and that means positions and frets; it takes a lot of experience to be able to just transfer something to the guitar off the top of your head.
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#21
I never thought of putting it in your head like that, but yeah, think of it first, that way, you won't have to worry about the key much. Because it'll sound wrong in your head. After thinkin of about 5-10 notes, figure out what fret to play them on, then write it down in form of a tab.
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#22
Quote by Don_Humpador
Er..Yes...But with a bit more feeling than just 'adding tricks'.

It's best to use some kind of backing track where you know the key and what scales you can use for it - listen to it for a while and try to come up with some nice melodies in your head that could be played over it. Then try to recreate those on the fretboard, and just expand from within those melodies into a full blown solo.


do you know any websites where i can get backing tracks? i mean simple riffs say in different modes, not actual backing tracks off songs
#23
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Only you totally do; if you come up with a melody in your head you're still going to need to transfer that to the guitar somehow and that means positions and frets; it takes a lot of experience to be able to just transfer something to the guitar off the top of your head.


This may sounds ridiculous, but you can record the melody (you came up in your head) on the computer while singing it! It works! This way the melody won't be forgotten and you have the time to transfer it to guitar.

However if you are familiar with the fretboard you can transfer it almost in real-time
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#24
If you want an amazing slow solo by RHCP check out Wet Sand off the Stadium Arcadium album. It's simple, but it has so much feeling; the note selection is perfect. Study that one.
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#25
Quote by SdKfz
This may sounds ridiculous, but you can record the melody (you came up in your head) on the computer while singing it! It works! This way the melody won't be forgotten and you have the time to transfer it to guitar.

However if you are familiar with the fretboard you can transfer it almost in real-time


Not that many people have recording facilities, especially not for vocals and fretboard familiarity brings me back to my original point: you need experience for that sort of thing.
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#26
hey guys,is there a secret to shredding? i can't even get the moving up and down right...i mean,i make a couple of mistakes when i start gathering speed...
#27
Quote by NoobOnZone
is there a secret to shredding?


Yes and it is this: slow down.

Speed is a byproduct of accuracy. The problem with you playing fast is that you're trying to perform actions your muscles haven't learned yet so you need to slow down and program your muscle memory, then you can speed up but only gradually.
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#28
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Yes and it is this: slow down.

Speed is a byproduct of accuracy. The problem with you playing fast is that you're trying to perform actions your muscles haven't learned yet so you need to slow down and program your muscle memory, then you can speed up but only gradually.


That's correct.
Start playing with a metronome the chromatic scale 3 octaves throughout. Set the metronome where you really feel comfortable with, even if you are playing annoying slow! Then speed up. Maybe setting your metronome 10 bpm higher will take you weeks, but that's ok
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#29
ok..i know this question is like totally not related...but maybe it is..just a little....K,i have this guitar and i want to change the neck to a fender neck...is there a type of fender neck thats good and fast for action? and if so,how much does it cost?