#1
hey guys just hoping someone can help me out quickly with this one. I've searched but I keep getting an error page everytime I do a search.

Right my neighbour gave my little brother and acoustic that her daughter didnt play and cause he already had an acoustic I payed him £10 for this one, it's just an Encore cheapy one but I thought it would come in handy when I'm writing songs. I'm primarily a bass player so having the acoustic helps with the songwriting.

Now the problem is the action is a little high and makes it hard to slide on so how would I go about lowering the action?

Thanks guys!
#2
loosen all the strings and pull out the saddle located at the bridge of the guitar. sand it down, trial and error is required, just sand a little at a time. U can also sand down the nut but i would just do the saddle at first as this maybe all that is required and if u also do the nut just take a little off as it doent take much to lower it i found.
if the inevitable does occur and u sand too much off as i did slice a thin layer of an old credit card and place it under the saddle/bridge, this will raise the action back ever so slightly.
#4
In addition, after the saddle height is reduced, you may have to find the right truss rod adjustment. If it buzzes a bit, you could turn the wrench counterclockwise add relief to the neck. If their is still too much relief with excess string height, you can rotate the wrench clockwise to straighten the neck.

I sanded my saddle down for close fingerstyle action. This was great...like an electric guitar. However, I could not strum aggressively without buzzing. A turn of the allen wrench on the truss rod counterclockwise fixed that. The action raised slightly. It is still very low...just under 3/32 (about 5/64) at the 12th fret. Now it is a good compromise: comfortable fingerstyle and medium strumming.
#5
That is entirely unneccesary. Turn your truss rod 1/4 turn counter clockwise. Check the string height and if it isn't comfortable try another 1/4 turn. Do that until it is where you want it. Wouldn't turn it more than say 1 turn all totalled. This adjustment may settle in over night and need adjustment the next day.

If you sand down the saddle your going to throw your intonation off. A change in the height of the saddle makes the string longer. This means that the guitar will be in tune maybe on the 2nd fret but not on the twelfth fret. The string length must remain the same. The truss rod adjustment is the least risky move. If the intonation is off you will have to take it in to the local guitar shop and have a set up done on it.
#6
Quote by Guitar Hack
That is entirely unneccesary. Turn your truss rod 1/4 turn counter clockwise. Check the string height and if it isn't comfortable try another 1/4 turn. Do that until it is where you want it. Wouldn't turn it more than say 1 turn all totalled. This adjustment may settle in over night and need adjustment the next day.

If you sand down the saddle your going to throw your intonation off. A change in the height of the saddle makes the string longer. This means that the guitar will be in tune maybe on the 2nd fret but not on the twelfth fret. The string length must remain the same. The truss rod adjustment is the least risky move. If the intonation is off you will have to take it in to the local guitar shop and have a set up done on it.


Ummm, no. The truss rod is not there to make quickie adjustments for action. Never has been either. It's there to provide neck relief due to the pull of steel strings. 1 complete turn of a truss rod is drastic as well. 1/8-1/4 is usually sufficient to provide the proper relief to prevent buzzing. It's also used to compensate for humidity changes in the guitar over it's lifespan. That said, yes, the truss rod adjustment does have an effect on action, but should be set first, and will be good for a long time once properly set. Most of the time, if the strings don't buzz anywhere, and you stay with the same gauge strings, the truss rod won't need adjusting at all.
As for sanding down the saddle, that won't mess up the intonation. Intonation is the length of the vibrating part of the string, from nut to saddle, not height away from the guitar. If you were to move the saddle either forward or back, then intonation would change, because you were making the scale either longer or shorter. Yes, it does make a small difference intonation wise to raise or lower the saddle, but not so much as you claim. Sanding down the bottom of the saddle 1/32" will drop the strings approx. 1/64" at the 12th fret. 1/16"=1/32, 1/8"=1/16" and so on. Simple trigonometry really.
Have a read at the site listed below, he has outlined the procedure for lowering action at the saddle, and apart from the beginning bits, doesn't mention intonation throughout the entire process.

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/LowerAction/loweraction01.html
#8
Quote by confusius
Lefty dave...you are the thread killer.


Well, thanks? Is that a good thing or not? I'm with it either way.