#1
i'm going to buy an american vintage strat soon. i went to a local shop here and he only had the '57 stratocaster so i asked if he could take the '62 in stock aswell so i could compare. he thought that i'd possibly not buy one of the guitars so i had to make clear that i was definitely going to buy one of the strats. now my question is, how could i haggle down the price of the strat ? or is it too late now that i said i was going to buy one ?


thanks pit for any help
#2
Haggling down a price would be hard, especially for a guitar like that. But maybe, seeing what guitar it is, you can get a hard-case thrown in or something. Don't say, I want a case. Hint at it. Say something, I'd travel with this but I have nothing to carry it with. See how the situation develops.
#4
Quote by Aldenté
take cash, shops always lower the price if your willing to pay cold hard cash.


+1

worked for me
Quote by Alix_D
Never heard of Seinfeld, what kind of music do they play? Assuming they use Kramers, it must be heavy!



SAVE GIBSON

#5
How to try out guitars

Before you select a guitar, there are a few things you need to think over.
-The style of music you play.
-A budget you can live with.
-How long you've been playing. If you've ever owned a guitar before.
We all gravitate towards the guitar that looks the Hawtest, but looks and color, shouldn't be your first concern.
Wood type, bridge type, pickup configuration, guitar weight, brand reputation, and UG member recommendations should all come into play.
You need to have in mind, a few guitars that suit you best, before you even walk into the store.

Walking into The Store:
Wait, you've already blown it! Are you sure you're in the right place? Most of us only have a couple of options.
Ideally you live in an area with large chains, and local shops. Keep in mind that large chains pay their workers with commission. A money driven worker will not be working towards your best interest, no matter how nice he seems. Local shops might be able to offer you a better deal, but they don't carry as large a selection.
It's good to get prices online, some stores will even match competitor's prices, but whenever possible, physically play as many guitars as possible. Keep in mind that in most cases, the recommended list price for a guitar, is about twice its actual selling price.
In addition, when you are trying to get more guitar for the money, It might be worth your time to look into local pawn shops, classified Ads or to check out Ebay. There are some good deals out there, you just need to know where to look.

Take a Friend:

Guitar stores can be overwhelming. When possible, bring a guitar playing friend with you, preferably someone with purchasing experience. You want him to be objective and to run interference for you, if you run into any pushy sales associates.
Start off by finding the models and styles in your price range. If you aren't happy with the choices, at least you'll create a basis for comparison.
If you have a favorite type of pick, make sure you have one in your pocket. You want to feel as comfortable as possible.
There's no reason to call over a sales associate just yet, because you should start off by playing your choices acoustically.

Testing a Guitar:

Once you're certain about the model, you're ready to test some guitars. Don't be afraid to ask for one off the wall. When they don't want one played, they will usually tag it, but it's a good idea to leave the top shelf guitars alone unless they are in your price range. Let the sales staff know you're serious and they will be more willing to work with you on a good deal.
To make things simple, I've made a checklist.
Before playing...
-Sit down in a quiet area and feel the guitars weight. Make sure it's balanced, and suited to your size.
-Move the knobs and switch. Make sure they are tight.
-Go to the input jack, see if it wiggles.
-Lift the guitar to your face. Check the headstock and neck joint for small cracks or chips.
-See if the neck looks straight.
-Shake the guitar. Listen for loose parts.
-Look at the fretboard. Make sure there are no wood imperfections, raised or crooked frets. Make sure the frets don't poke through the side of the board.
Before plugging in....
-Strum and fret each string. You're listening for fret buzz.
Keep in mind, guitars aren't always set up prior to placement on the selling floor.
Sometimes they aren't even tuned. Action and fret buzz are USUALLY adjustable, but the guitar shouldn't buzz and rattle everywhere.
-Check the guitar's harmonics. Compare tones at the 12th. See if the guitar is intonated.
-Make sure the board isn't too wide for you. See if you can reach the higher frets.
-Make sure the bridge saddles are level, with no sharp points.
-Make sure the tuners don't feel loose.
Amp it up...
-Ok, find the pain in the ass sales guy. You'll need a guitar cable, and an amp,
JUST LIKE THE ONE YOU HAVE AT HOME!!!!
Don't Let him plug you into a $1,000 amp. You're testing the guitar not the amp.
-If possible, have a riff ready. If you're tagged as a complete noob, you'll get less respect.
-Use the switch. Select the neck pickup. Select the bridge. Listen for crackling noises.
Roll the knobs and listen for noise. Touch and lift your hand off the bridge, listen for buzzing that stops when you ground it. If you're into Metal, and are looking at a humbucker guitar, expect to hear less noise than if you were testing a single-coil guitar.
-Check the pickups with the amp on clean and with gain.
Questions to Ask...
-Hopefully you already know the wood type of your choice guitar. You need to make sure the salesman knows that you've done your homework.
"Do you have any other Mahogany guitars in this price range, you could recommend?"
-Let the salesman know that you've noticed any imperfections.
"I like this ibanez, but I'm picking up fretbuzz through the amp. Do your guitars come
setup?"
-Spend a while playing the guitar. Look upset even if you like the guitar.
"What can I get this guitar for?" "Does this guitar come with a case?"
You want to walk out of there, with as many free extras as possible. Especially if you've found anything wrong with the guitar. Any minor flaw, might work as a bargaining chip.
- "What's your return policy?"
Final thoughts...
IF YOU LIKE THE GUITAR ON THE SALES FLOOR, TAKE THAT GUITAR, NOT ONE FROM THE STOCKROOM. Unless it's a floor model, you should still get a box for it. You just don't want to take the time to find the perfect guitar, only to end up with a lemon in the end.
Also keep in mind, stores make a lot of money off of purchase insurance. In almost every case, it's not worth it to buy protection on a guitar. Except for the neck, every part is easily replaced. In addition, any flaws would be apparent within the usual 30 day return time frame.

Good Luck, Jenny
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#6
Just kind of talk to them a little bit. "Well I am going to get this guitar but what can we do this for?"

By the way it should also come with a hardshell case and if it doesnt make them throw in the case or else say you could go somewhere else and get it where they will throw in the case

Also, how much do you want to haggle?
Gibson 58 VOS, Gibson Rich Robinson ES-335, Fender Strat, Fender RoadWorn 50's Tele, Gibson LP Jr Special

Marshall JTM45, Fender BJR NOS
#8
Get the "internet price" of the guitars you want before going in and bring that up when discussing price. Just be polite about it, suggest you would rather buy from them, but only at a reasonable price.
#9
If he refuses to haggle with you, refuse to buy. Simple as that..

Point out small flaws, they decrease value incredibly.

If he wants to haggle, try the "well the shop the next town over was willing to give me this deal..." and so on and so forth.
#10
Quote by jj1565
How to try out guitars

Before you select a guitar, there are a few things you need to think over.
-The style of music you play.
-A budget you can live with.
-How long you've been playing. If you've ever owned a guitar before.
We all gravitate towards the guitar that looks the Hawtest, but looks and color, shouldn't be your first concern.
Wood type, bridge type, pickup configuration, guitar weight, brand reputation, and UG member recommendations should all come into play.
You need to have in mind, a few guitars that suit you best, before you even walk into the store.

Walking into The Store:
Wait, you've already blown it! Are you sure you're in the right place? Most of us only have a couple of options.
Ideally you live in an area with large chains, and local shops. Keep in mind that large chains pay their workers with commission. A money driven worker will not be working towards your best interest, no matter how nice he seems. Local shops might be able to offer you a better deal, but they don't carry as large a selection.
It's good to get prices online, some stores will even match competitor's prices, but whenever possible, physically play as many guitars as possible. Keep in mind that in most cases, the recommended list price for a guitar, is about twice its actual selling price.
In addition, when you are trying to get more guitar for the money, It might be worth your time to look into local pawn shops, classified Ads or to check out Ebay. There are some good deals out there, you just need to know where to look.

Take a Friend:

Guitar stores can be overwhelming. When possible, bring a guitar playing friend with you, preferably someone with purchasing experience. You want him to be objective and to run interference for you, if you run into any pushy sales associates.
Start off by finding the models and styles in your price range. If you aren't happy with the choices, at least you'll create a basis for comparison.
If you have a favorite type of pick, make sure you have one in your pocket. You want to feel as comfortable as possible.
There's no reason to call over a sales associate just yet, because you should start off by playing your choices acoustically.

Testing a Guitar:

Once you're certain about the model, you're ready to test some guitars. Don't be afraid to ask for one off the wall. When they don't want one played, they will usually tag it, but it's a good idea to leave the top shelf guitars alone unless they are in your price range. Let the sales staff know you're serious and they will be more willing to work with you on a good deal.
To make things simple, I've made a checklist.
Before playing...
-Sit down in a quiet area and feel the guitars weight. Make sure it's balanced, and suited to your size.
-Move the knobs and switch. Make sure they are tight.
-Go to the input jack, see if it wiggles.
-Lift the guitar to your face. Check the headstock and neck joint for small cracks or chips.
-See if the neck looks straight.
-Shake the guitar. Listen for loose parts.
-Look at the fretboard. Make sure there are no wood imperfections, raised or crooked frets. Make sure the frets don't poke through the side of the board.
Before plugging in....
-Strum and fret each string. You're listening for fret buzz.
Keep in mind, guitars aren't always set up prior to placement on the selling floor.
Sometimes they aren't even tuned. Action and fret buzz are USUALLY adjustable, but the guitar shouldn't buzz and rattle everywhere.
-Check the guitar's harmonics. Compare tones at the 12th. See if the guitar is intonated.
-Make sure the board isn't too wide for you. See if you can reach the higher frets.
-Make sure the bridge saddles are level, with no sharp points.
-Make sure the tuners don't feel loose.
Amp it up...
-Ok, find the pain in the ass sales guy. You'll need a guitar cable, and an amp,
JUST LIKE THE ONE YOU HAVE AT HOME!!!!
Don't Let him plug you into a $1,000 amp. You're testing the guitar not the amp.
-If possible, have a riff ready. If you're tagged as a complete noob, you'll get less respect.
-Use the switch. Select the neck pickup. Select the bridge. Listen for crackling noises.
Roll the knobs and listen for noise. Touch and lift your hand off the bridge, listen for buzzing that stops when you ground it. If you're into Metal, and are looking at a humbucker guitar, expect to hear less noise than if you were testing a single-coil guitar.
-Check the pickups with the amp on clean and with gain.
Questions to Ask...
-Hopefully you already know the wood type of your choice guitar. You need to make sure the salesman knows that you've done your homework.
"Do you have any other Mahogany guitars in this price range, you could recommend?"
-Let the salesman know that you've noticed any imperfections.
"I like this ibanez, but I'm picking up fretbuzz through the amp. Do your guitars come
setup?"
-Spend a while playing the guitar. Look upset even if you like the guitar.
"What can I get this guitar for?" "Does this guitar come with a case?"
You want to walk out of there, with as many free extras as possible. Especially if you've found anything wrong with the guitar. Any minor flaw, might work as a bargaining chip.
- "What's your return policy?"
Final thoughts...
IF YOU LIKE THE GUITAR ON THE SALES FLOOR, TAKE THAT GUITAR, NOT ONE FROM THE STOCKROOM. Unless it's a floor model, you should still get a box for it. You just don't want to take the time to find the perfect guitar, only to end up with a lemon in the end.
Also keep in mind, stores make a lot of money off of purchase insurance. In almost every case, it's not worth it to buy protection on a guitar. Except for the neck, every part is easily replaced. In addition, any flaws would be apparent within the usual 30 day return time frame.

Good Luck, Jenny

thanks. i did read that stickie though, incase you though i didn't
i made this thread to get some other 'tricks' also

but if i understood your post correctly, the only thing that would be good for me is pointing out any imperfections ? (cause that's the only thing you made bold)
Last edited by The red Strat. at Sep 19, 2007,
#11
If the price is like $2000, say you've only got $1800. Bring a parent, and plead with them to lend you the extra $200, and act (together) like that's a lot of money to borrow. The salesperson will possibly be more focused on bringing in a large amount of money, rather than the exact floor price of the instrument.
#12
Quote by blue_strat
If the price is like $2000, say you've only got $1800. Bring a parent, and plead with them to lend you the extra $200, and act (together) like that's a lot of money to borrow. The salesperson will possibly be more focused on bringing in a large amount of money, rather than the exact floor price of the instrument.

hmmm that won't work cause he already knows i have enough money...
#13
make sure to search for scratches etc..
If you find one tell the guy about it.

my friend haggled down 100 that way (on an amp)


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#14
Quote by noxiosimitator
make sure to search for scratches etc..
If you find one tell the guy about it.

my friend haggled down 100 that way (on an amp)

ah ok cool i'll do that.

keep the 'tricks' coming guys
Last edited by The red Strat. at Sep 19, 2007,
#15
If you can come off as confident you shouldn't have any trouble, just don't be insecure about it. I helped my friend buy a guitar who is a younger girl, she couldn't haggle so I did it for her. I basically told the guy to lower the price and throw in a better case and a strap. It was a nice $40 strap too, not the cheap ones they normally give you. It's all in being respectful, but authoritative.
Survivor of the St. John's Lockdown
Quote by SG thrasher

The thread-starter is a legend.
Seriously, who thinks "Shit, i'm gonna die, BRB, Ima' tell UG."?

Quote by The_Paranoia

Congratz man, you are a true, American Hero.
Go Schneiderman!

Gun Facts: Educate Yourself
#16
Quote by Schneiderman
If you can come off as confident you shouldn't have any trouble, just don't be insecure about it. I helped my friend buy a guitar who is a younger girl, she couldn't haggle so I did it for her. I basically told the guy to lower the price and throw in a better case and a strap. It was a nice $40 strap too, not the cheap ones they normally give you. It's all in being respectful, but authoritative.

and how did you tell him to do that ??
#17
Quote by Schneiderman
If you can come off as confident you shouldn't have any trouble, just don't be insecure about it. I helped my friend buy a guitar who is a younger girl, she couldn't haggle so I did it for her. I basically told the guy to lower the price and throw in a better case and a strap. It was a nice $40 strap too, not the cheap ones they normally give you. It's all in being respectful, but authoritative.


Listen to this guy.
R E G G A E
#18
yeah, that's from something i wrote a while back, in the stickies, GODD JOB reading those!

i was running out before, but wanted to copy that in really quick.

basically, yes you point out some flaws, maybe bring up why this guitar isnt exactly what you were looking for.
^like said up there, online priceless help. and maybe saying that mom or dad arent crazy about you spending so much.

and then see what he's going to throw in there. a case, a cable, strings.

make sure the guitar is setup and i guess, for the most part, leave happy.

if buying this guitar dosent feel great, then maybe you havent found the best guitar for you.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#19
Quote by jj1565
yeah, that's from something i wrote a while back, in the stickies, GODD JOB reading those!

i was running out before, but wanted to copy that in really quick.

basically, yes you point out some flaws, maybe bring up why this guitar isnt exactly what you were looking for.
^like said up there, online priceless help. and maybe saying that mom or dad arent crazy about you spending so much.

and then see what he's going to throw in there. a case, a cable, strings.

make sure the guitar is setup and i guess, for the most part, leave happy.

if buying this guitar dosent feel great, then maybe you havent found the best guitar for you.

thanks for all your help ! and to everyone else aswell !
is it normal though that a guitar comes setup ? cause it had fretbuzz when i tested it...
#20
I should ask my dad about haggling, he somehow got a fender jaguar down from £1000 to £650 :S

wish i could haggle like that....
#21
Quote by The red Strat.
thanks for all your help ! and to everyone else aswell !
is it normal though that a guitar comes setup ? cause it had fretbuzz when i tested it...


It really depends on the store and the brand. Some companies do their best at the factory to set up the guitar (usually being very general about it), and when it gets to the store, the store MAY do a further setup.

At any rate, bring that up, that it needs to be setup, and they'll either knock a little bit more off the price, or provide the setup for you.
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#22
Quote by GLP_Arclite
I should ask my dad about haggling, he somehow got a fender jaguar down from £1000 to £650 :S

wish i could haggle like that....





Quote by Hakael
It really depends on the store and the brand. Some companies do their best at the factory to set up the guitar (usually being very general about it), and when it gets to the store, the store MAY do a further setup.

At any rate, bring that up, that it needs to be setup, and they'll either knock a little bit more off the price, or provide the setup for you.

ok i'll do that, ty !
Last edited by The red Strat. at Sep 19, 2007,
#23
Quote by The red Strat.
thanks for all your help ! and to everyone else aswell !
is it normal though that a guitar comes setup ? cause it had fretbuzz when i tested it...



some acoustic buzz is normal.
but if you're spending a grand on a guitar, you need make sure it's not buzzing, heard thru the amp when you leave with it.

you're going to want to have them set that up for you. most local places include that with purchase.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#25
One of my best deals was getting my amp. We talked about the price, starting off looking quite disappointed and uncertain. As the price went down, I would look more pleased, and mention how "it's getting more and more tempting." After settling on the price, I THEN brought up that I had equipment to trade in. So we went to my car so he could take a look at what I had.

He happened to really like my car (Subaru 2005 WRX) as he'd been looking to buy one. We chatted about the car for a little bit before we went back in the store, and negotiated my trade ins. After talking the price down even further with the trade ins, I jokingly mentioned that if he could knock off a little bit more, I'd let him drive my car.

Next thing you know, we're driving around the area for 10 or so minutes, and I got another $50 knocked off.

So, after that. Finally came up to the register to pay for the amp, and when he totaled everything up, I gave him a gift certificate from the store I had won in a contest earlier.

~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#26
Quote by Hakael
One of my best deals was getting my amp. We talked about the price, starting off looking quite disappointed and uncertain. As the price went down, I would look more pleased, and mention how "it's getting more and more tempting." After settling on the price, I THEN brought up that I had equipment to trade in. So we went to my car so he could take a look at what I had.

He happened to really like my car (Subaru 2005 WRX) as he'd been looking to buy one. We chatted about the car for a little bit before we went back in the store, and negotiated my trade ins. After talking the price down even further with the trade ins, I jokingly mentioned that if he could knock off a little bit more, I'd let him drive my car.

Next thing you know, we're driving around the area for 10 or so minutes, and I got another $50 knocked off.

So, after that. Finally came up to the register to pay for the amp, and when he totaled everything up, I gave him a gift certificate from the store I had won in a contest earlier.


i bet he wasn't happy when he realized how much he lowered the price

the looking dissapointed thing won't work with me though cause i already told him how much i loved the guitar neither will the car thingy
Last edited by The red Strat. at Sep 19, 2007,
#27
Quote by The red Strat.
i bet he wasn't happy when he realized how much he lowered the price


I hope he still has a job, I might want another piece of equipment there later.
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#29
Quote by Hakael
One of my best deals was getting my amp. We talked about the price, starting off looking quite disappointed and uncertain. As the price went down, I would look more pleased, and mention how "it's getting more and more tempting." After settling on the price, I THEN brought up that I had equipment to trade in. So we went to my car so he could take a look at what I had.

He happened to really like my car (Subaru 2005 WRX) as he'd been looking to buy one. We chatted about the car for a little bit before we went back in the store, and negotiated my trade ins. After talking the price down even further with the trade ins, I jokingly mentioned that if he could knock off a little bit more, I'd let him drive my car.

Next thing you know, we're driving around the area for 10 or so minutes, and I got another $50 knocked off.

So, after that. Finally came up to the register to pay for the amp, and when he totaled everything up, I gave him a gift certificate from the store I had won in a contest earlier.



Wow, you bastard
#30
You could practice haggling at yard sales. It'll give you some experience talking down prices. You should be polite and friendly, but not too friendly. Mention that you've been shopping around at competing retailers. Don't give away your intention of buying until you're happy with the price. When you find the gear you want don't look excited; it'll make haggling a lot harder.
Order & Justice
Order Restored, Justice Served
#31
If it costs like $2000, tell him that (insert rival shop name here) will sell it to you for $1800 bucks, and tell him thanks for letting you try them but the others just have better prices.

I´m a ghey fathers fcker if he doesn´t give you an even better price.
Though don´t expect to get a good deal in the future from that shop.
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