#1
Is there a formulaic way to tell what the sharps and flats are for each note on the circle of fifths are? As in, is the sharp for each note 2 half steps down, or something similar to that?

I know that the relative minor is 3 half steps down from the major, so would that mean that the relative minor's flats are 3 half steps down from those of the major as well?
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#3
Relative minor shares the same key as it's relative major...as for orders of sharps and flats, just memorizing. Everything is either a 4th or 5th away depending on what you're doing.
#4
For sharps remember: Funny Charlie Gets Drunk At Every Bash

For flats: BEAD GCF
#5
Go up a fifth (or down a fourth), add a sharp.
Go down a fifth (or up a fourth), add a flat.

Go up a tone (major second or two fifths up or two fourths down), add two sharps.
Go down a tone (major second or two fifths down or two fourths up), add two flats.

Go up a major sixth (three fifths up, three fourths down), add three sharps.
Go down a major sixth (three fifths down, three fours up), add three flats.

Go up a major third (four fifths up, four fourths down), add four sharps.
Go down a major third (four fifths down, four fourths up), add four flats.

Go up a major seventh (five fifths up, five fourths down), add five sharps.
Go down a major seventh (five fifths down, five fourths up), add five flats.

Go up a tritone (six fifths up, six fourths down), add six sharps.
Go down a tritone (six fifths down, six fourths up), add six flats.

Knowing this you can derive every key signature possible as long as you know one. The rule applies for the major scale, the minor scale, and every other mode.

EDIT: Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle/Battle Ends And Down Goes Charles' Father. But that only tells you the order of flats and sharps, it isn't very theoretically useful.
People writing songs that voices never shared
No one dared
Disturb the Sound of Silence
#6
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
Err...could you please rephrase that question =\


Haha, sorry.

I meant is there a "same-every-time" way to know what the flats and sharps of each major and relative minor key are?

As in, is the sharp of a major key always 3 half steps down? (Obviously not, but that's the kind of thing that I meant).

Me2NiK: Can you just choose any one of those methods, or do you have to somehow apply all of them?
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#7
You can choose any one, they all work.


Want to know how many sharps in the key of D major?
Know the key of C major?
Go up a second, you add two sharps. D has two sharps.
People writing songs that voices never shared
No one dared
Disturb the Sound of Silence