#1
Can someone explain for me how the different type of string effect the guitar's sound?
Is it true that softer string is more friendly for beginner?
G͔͓̅e͎͉̟̽ͬ͐̎̃͐ͨͅå͈͖͕̹̤̟̐̏͋ͅr̩͕̫̰̗s̹̳̼ͥ̒̍̄̅ͥ̚:


ESP Standard Eclipse I CTM VW
ESP LTD Deluxe H-1001
ESP LTD Deluxe Viper-1000 STBC
ESP Edwards E-EX-100STD
Warmoth Paulcaster "Tiger"
Tanglewood TW170 AS
Vox Tonelab ST
Blackstar HT-1R


#2
it depends. heavier gauged strings are harder to bend, but are less likely to cut your fingers. lighter gauged strings are more likely to cut your fingers, but easier to bend. heavier gauges are better for heavy metal type stuff also. just make sure your nut on ur guitar is big enough for the low E to be gauged over .50 if you want them.
#3
the heavier strings are more suitable for beginners i guess, cause your not gonna be doing too many bends, and your callouses are still growing, so your gonna be feeling a lot of pain with the lighter strings, and what sniper_wolf90 said lol
#4
Go with hyrbid 10's. The top three strings (e,b,g) are smaller and easier to bend, but the higher strings are thicker and get better tone (and hurt less)
Suhr Custom, Flaxwood Rautia or Grosh Tele thru
HBE Medicine Bawl Wah
Analogman BiComp
Texas Two Step OD
Fulltone Ultimate Octave/Fuzz
Boss CE-2
TC Nova Delay
SLO-100, 65 London or Bogner Shiva
Ask me about any of this stuff!
#6
I think that heavier strings would be ok for a beginner, but if ur playing mostly standard stuff, like learning chords and simple stuff, then lighter ones would be best. Soundwise, think about how the Chili's sound with no effects, kinda thin and jangly. then think about how SRV sounded clean, very thick and bluesy. SRV and John Frusciante have the same type of guitars, but SRV uses 13's i think, whereas John uses 9's or maybe 10's.
#7
Wow, can I really cut my fingers with light strings? Not awesome...

What about tapping, hammer/pull and suchs on lighter strings? I find it quite hard to do these things on my current guitar which came to me with a quite heavy set of strings. I know my fingers still lack the strength but wouldn't it be easier if it was lighter strings?

And what branch should I go for? I've been thinking about Elixir Nanoweb because my friend recommended me.
#8
heavier strings are going to be harder to learn barre chords on though becasue of the increased string tension.
#9
Quote by hminh87
And what branch should I go for? I've been thinking about Elixir Nanoweb because my friend recommended me.


i use ernie balls. hardly original but the quality is good and they come in lots of flavours too. i currently use .11s i did try .12s but i couldnt bend the 'g' string as it was like an iron bar... why not try your friends guitar with the elixirs on and see if you like before splashing out?
#10
Lighter strings are better for beginners because they are easyer to use but its best to use the heavyest strings that you can manage. Also if you do bends use lighter strings or drop the tuning a semitone to make bending easier.
#11
hhmmm......i use ernie ball. 10-46. i like the 10-52 alot better but my guitar i have now doesnt have a big enough nut
#12
Quote by qotsa1998
I think that heavier strings would be ok for a beginner, but if ur playing mostly standard stuff, like learning chords and simple stuff, then lighter ones would be best. Soundwise, think about how the Chili's sound with no effects, kinda thin and jangly. then think about how SRV sounded clean, very thick and bluesy. SRV and John Frusciante have the same type of guitars, but SRV uses 13's i think, whereas John uses 9's or maybe 10's.


I heard that at one point he was actually putting together 16 gauge sets. Beastly.


No strings are going to cut your fingers. Heavier strings will make your fingers hurt more in the beginning because you have to push down harder on them. 13s take so much force that I leave pieces of skin on them when I play even after years of experience. Lighter gauge strings are better for beginners pretty much across the board. The lightest ones are really easy to accidentally bend out of tune, but when you're starting out your ear won't be good enough to notice.