#1
So I line my peavey classic 30 directly into my pc, and unfortunately it's not powerful enough of a computer to run any recording program you can buy so i have to use audacity. Whenever I put distortion on it sounds really really terrible and has a very distorted (not the good kind) sound. It stays that way until I turn the gain down a lot, and then you can't even tell there's distortion on. Anyone have ideas?
#2
buy a good distortion pedal?
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#4
I meant on the recording. It sounds great if I'm not recording, but on the pc it sounds like crap.
#6
I too use audacity. You can listen to my recordings and check out the distortion because I don't think it sounds awful. I use a peavey valveking. The best advice I can give you is to look at the input volume by clicking on the microphone picture in the top right corner of the audacity screen. Check to make sure that the red bar bounces almost all the way to the top of the meter. It is okay if it hits the top and comes back down but if it stays up there for a while, you have a problem. You should probably think about getting a microphone, too, because it sounds much better. I never record direct from my amp. I occasionally use an rp80 by digitech but i do not like the sound of it. My best advice would be to get a shure sm57 or some kind of usb mic (dynamic or condenser - dynamic is easier but requires you to turn your amp up louder), and record your amp that way. Pedals can sound really fake... I will put up a recording that I made using only my pedal in a little, but all of my recordings now I used a microphone on. They are all done on audacity, which is great for a free program.

Edit: I checked out your recordings and I see what you mean. Like on your hard rock song, the gain is way down. Try to keep the volume low and then crank the gain! Remember to check that input level on audacity. You should also check out the program Hydrogen (freeware) if you want to add a drum/percussion element to your sound. Good luck! Sorry for the long post!
Last edited by gunsnroses89 at Sep 19, 2007,
#7
Quote by Masonpwiley
Get a pedal.

NO!!!
Quote by ChaoticVengence
buy a good distortion pedal?

ACK

The problem you are having is not with your amps tone per se - you have a good amp and using a distortion pedal with it would ruin the warm tube sound. The problem is that you are going out the line out of your amp into the line in on your stock soundcard. A typical no-no. I suggest you get a decent audio interface and a mic so that you don't have run out the line out. This will clean up your sound 200-300%. Good luck.
PM Me for any help you need with recording systems/tips
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Good call

Man, you should be a mod, you know everything.

#8
Quote by thrice_removed
NO!!!

ACK

The problem you are having is not with your amps tone per se - you have a good amp and using a distortion pedal with it would ruin the warm tube sound. The problem is that you are going out the line out of your amp into the line in on your stock soundcard. A typical no-no. I suggest you get a decent audio interface and a mic so that you don't have run out the line out. This will clean up your sound 200-300%. Good luck.

yeah..i would but i don't have a job and it's actually my parents' computer, not mine. The mic input on mine got messed up when I lined in to it..not sure how. thanks though.

@gnr89:

yeah i turn everything way down. I guess it's not thatbig of a deal, but still.
#10
Compression compression compression. It is the secret to distortion. I didn't even read your post, but add compression and it will sound better no matter what.
#11
99% of amps will not sound that good direct in to a soundcard, mixer of whatever. You gotta mic your amp into a mixer then to your sound card.

edit: if you're unable to mic your amp (no mic.. or can't be loud because oyu live in an apartment) you can try some cabinet modellers that affect the tone after its recorded.

or even just some creative EQ'ing
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#12
Quote by thrice_removed
NO!!!

ACK

The problem you are having is not with your amps tone per se - you have a good amp and using a distortion pedal with it would ruin the warm tube sound. The problem is that you are going out the line out of your amp into the line in on your stock soundcard. A typical no-no. I suggest you get a decent audio interface and a mic so that you don't have run out the line out. This will clean up your sound 200-300%. Good luck.

LISTEN TO THIS MAN!!!

Don't waste money on **** pedals if you have a ncie amp...get an interface of some sort...even a cheap USB soundcard interface will help...that and actually mic'ing that amp...as was said, most amps sound like poop when recording direct.
#13
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Turn the input volume down.

And turn the gain on your amplifier right down.

And turn the mids up.

Good point. If you have a low budget TS - this is a good place to start.
PM Me for any help you need with recording systems/tips
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Good call

Man, you should be a mod, you know everything.

#14
so if i have an awesome amp, sounds great, audix i5 instrument mic, and an audio interface. i need a mixer between the mic and the audio interface?

what are some budget mixers which would do the deed for me?
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#15
Quote by ECistheBest
so if i have an awesome amp, sounds great, audix i5 instrument mic, and an audio interface. i need a mixer between the mic and the audio interface?

what are some budget mixers which would do the deed for me?

No, you don't need a mixer, if the interface has a preamp...if the interface doesn't have a built in preamp, then you will need one, which is where a mixer would come in.
#17
Quote by Conjunctuator
Compression compression compression. It is the secret to distortion. I didn't even read your post, but add compression and it will sound better no matter what.


You should have read the post

Compression will improve distorted guitar, but only to a very limited extent.

You also have to bear in mind that anything Peavy amps don't record very well.
#18
Quote by ErikHoppy
LISTEN TO THIS MAN!!!

Don't waste money on **** pedals if you have a ncie amp...get an interface of some sort...even a cheap USB soundcard interface will help...that and actually mic'ing that amp...as was said, most amps sound like poop when recording direct.

What are some USB interfaces you can get without software? the only one i know of is stealthplug, but that comes with software.

I tried micing, but it sounds really crappy. I just prob don't know how to do it well.
#21
Quote by boboguitar
preamp?

He has one built in.
PM Me for any help you need with recording systems/tips
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Good call

Man, you should be a mod, you know everything.

#22
Quote by BrianApocalypse
^ that's basically it.

Even with a crap mike and amplifier, you can get some good tones going.

So what are some tips for micing? Do I need a stand? All I've done now is just set it infront of the amp on the floor.
#24
Quote by Conjunctuator
Compression compression compression. It is the secret to distortion. I didn't even read your post, but add compression and it will sound better no matter what.


Compressing a distorted guitar? I'm going to have to disagree.

A distorted guitar is already heavily compressed as it is, adding compression after the track is recorded would be silly since the volume is not going to be fluctuating much. Compression should be used to level out volumes.

Unless, of course, you're going for that pushed-everything-too-hard sound, ala "Song 2" by Blur. But that's a pretty tailored production, and not for everyone.
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#25
Quote by BrianApocalypse
You really need a stand, otherwise the mike will pickup horrible low frequencies and other undesirable tones.

You can buy a little tabletop stand, perfect for putting on the floor in front of a speaker cone. Look on t'internet

Tips for mic'ing?

Read this:

http://www.tweakheadz.com/guitarists_guide_to_recording.htm

Seems like a good site, thanks, I'll check it out. One thing though, my mic is a $10 walmart mic, does it really matter? I'm not going for pro. grade quality, just stuff that sounds fairly decent.
#26
yeah the $10 walmart mic is hurting you. for 100$ you can get something that will be more than enough for a long time, and its not that hard to come across 100$ as you will hear everywhere, go SM57 or SM58 and you will be set.
#27
unfortunately 100$ is way outside of my budget, as I only make $10 a week. I don't have a job yet. I'm going to try to get one once I get my liscence and a car.
#28
yeah turn computer line in or mic in (which ever one you are doing) down. if you are using a mic in, then its probably never going to sound very good distorted. But, turn either or down depending on which your are using
#29
Nothing wrong with a cheap microphone.

Unless you have a good, professional quality microphone preamp, you'd notice very little difference between a super cheap kareoke mike and an SM57.
#30
Quote by weirdjohn87
Compressing a distorted guitar? I'm going to have to disagree.

A distorted guitar is already heavily compressed as it is, adding compression after the track is recorded would be silly since the volume is not going to be fluctuating much. Compression should be used to level out volumes.

Unless, of course, you're going for that pushed-everything-too-hard sound, ala "Song 2" by Blur. But that's a pretty tailored production, and not for everyone.


I'm actually all for compression but not on individual tracks when it comes to distorted guitars. It is an excellent tool for giving a bunch of guitars a more cohesive sound though; just set up a bus and rout all the guitars rack to it and add compression. This kind of batch (or additive) compression is worth its weight in gold when it comes to pulling a production together.
#31
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Nothing wrong with a cheap microphone.

Unless you have a good, professional quality microphone preamp, you'd notice very little difference between a super cheap kareoke mike and an SM57.

alright than. thanks
#32
Quote by Spamwise
So what are some tips for micing? Do I need a stand? All I've done now is just set it infront of the amp on the floor.


Sound on Sound had a great article on mic'ing guitar in the Aug 2007 issue.

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/aug07/articles/guitaramprecording.htm

I picked up a practically new, used Shure SM57 on Ebay for about $60. I have used it going directly into the 1/8 mic input on my computer and it is pretty darn good for the 15 minutes (until the baby started crying) I was able to play.

My next purchase is an interface. I am leaning toward the Line 6 Toneport UX1. Anyone have any recommendations on others in the $150 range?
#33
hey rgorke, you don't WORK for sound on sound do you?

Just kidding!

The thing to remember with any recording is that, of course, if it doesn't sound right at source, it won't sound good on wax.

PS.) There's not too much in that toneport price range, for a little more you could get an m audio interface, they're supposed to be very good.

Otherwise, you may be able to get your mitts on a yamaha or behringer model.

But then, you see, you get a better software (well, not better, but more extensive) deal with the toneport, so it's really just a case of "that's the best".

Unfortunately, Line 6 have saturated the market with their brand of "cheap sounds for cheap humans".
Last edited by BrianApocalypse at Sep 28, 2007,