Poll: Should I?
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View poll results: Should I?
Do it! You know you want to!
18 58%
You've got to be kidding me!
13 42%
Voters: 31.
#1
Long story short.
I send my basses to get their regular setup at a local shop.
And one day I go to my teachers luthier as the local shop is closed.
They tell me that BOTH my warwicks necks are warped or something like that. (Lousy local shop ****ed up my necks.)
They both need a new truss rod
I get the money.
Right now they are repairing the five stringer, everything is going to be fine.
I'm going to send the 4 stringer next and I'm wondering if I should defret it, seeing as it's going to be with the luthier a couple of days and I really don't play it because I can do everything on the fiver.
Should I defret?
BTW I already have a fretless but the sound is VERY weak and I have been thinking in buying the Jaco sig to have a good fretless(but thanks to stuff that has appeared I no longer have the money)
#2
I'd say don't defret, incase something happens to your 5 again and you needed a fretted and buy the Jaco sig.
Quote by Demonikk
+1
I live by the method: 3 or less orange warning labels, and it's safe as a kitten


Quote by Charlatan_001
EDIT: Sammcl pretty much got it dead on.
#3
Quote by sammcl-15
I'd say don't defret, incase something happens to your 5 again and you needed a fretted and buy the Jaco sig.

I don't have the money for the Jaco and I won't for a while, a BIG while.
#4
Quote by watchingmefall
I don't have the money for the Jaco and I won't for a while, a BIG while.


Then you just answered your own question
#5
Quote by Footzyrama
Then you just answered your own question


+1, do you have the money for a defret now?

And can you slap okay on your 5? Some people have trouble.
Quote by Demonikk
+1
I live by the method: 3 or less orange warning labels, and it's safe as a kitten


Quote by Charlatan_001
EDIT: Sammcl pretty much got it dead on.
#6
Yeah, you know you do. You already have that clenching in your gut. You know the one. The one where you really want to take a risk but there might be some repercussions later on. Where if you don't do it, you'll get a sick feeling after your chance and you'll be very "what if?" for a while and if you do it, you'll feel fine until maybe something does go wrong. That feeling. I would say do it. It's up to you though.
You might want to ask yourself these questions:
1)Will I definitely be satisfied with my 5 string as my only fretted now?
2)Will I definitely be satisfied with my 5 string, and not need the money from selling the four string anytime soon?
3)Am I sure the fretless will be good?
4)Will the fretless last for awhile and make any costs worthwhile?

I assume you're doing it with the luthier. The professional one.
#7
Quote by sammcl-15
+1, do you have the money for a defret now?

And can you slap okay on your 5? Some people have trouble.

Yes, the money for the defret is fine and I also know the luthier personally, so it's okay. And I can slap fine on the five stringer but I don't really like slap so I don't do it often, I prefer tapping.

Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Yeah, you know you do. You already have that clenching in your gut. You know the one. The one where you really want to take a risk but there might be some repercussions later on. Where if you don't do it, you'll get a sick feeling after your chance and you'll be very "what if?" for a while and if you do it, you'll feel fine until maybe something does go wrong. That feeling. I would say do it. It's up to you though.
You might want to ask yourself these questions:
1)Will I definitely be satisfied with my 5 string as my only fretted now?
2)Will I definitely be satisfied with my 5 string, and not need the money from selling the four string anytime soon?
3)Am I sure the fretless will be good?
4)Will the fretless last for awhile and make any costs worthwhile?

I assume you're doing it with the luthier. The professional one.

I really play the 4 very little, every now and then. And yes, the defret will be done with the real luthier, I'm never going back to the shop.
Last edited by watchingmefall at Sep 19, 2007,
#8
I'd say go with the de-fretting, especially since you don't slap that much, and since you're looking for a good fretless anyway, its a good money saving idea
#9
Man I say go for it. I definately agree with jazzy's take on it because i'm the type of person that always makes a choice and it makes me feel like an idiot afterword but by the sound of it your 5er is your dominant bass anyway and if you're as far away from the Jaco sig as you say then spend the little bit extra for the defret, and I recommend seeing if the luthier can do an epoxy coating while he's at it, that's just a personal preferance of course but I think it really helps insure the investment of your fretless.

Oh and by the way, what Jaco sig are you saving for, the standard or the relic?
#10
Quote by thunderbritches
Man I say go for it. I definately agree with jazzy's take on it because i'm the type of person that always makes a choice and it makes me feel like an idiot afterword but by the sound of it your 5er is your dominant bass anyway and if you're as far away from the Jaco sig as you say then spend the little bit extra for the defret, and I recommend seeing if the luthier can do an epoxy coating while he's at it, that's just a personal preferance of course but I think it really helps insure the investment of your fretless.

Oh and by the way, what Jaco sig are you saving for, the standard or the relic?

The standard, I am not made of money. And the luthier CAN make the defret, but I am still thinking and pondering the posibliities.
#11
Yeah I would personally love to get the relic but I personally don't have $3000 just lying around, hell i don't even have $10 just lying around. Anyway, are you gunna do an epoxy coating on it or just leave it wood? And I never asked what kind of warwick is the 4 string?
#12
Quote by thunderbritches
Yeah I would personally love to get the relic but I personally don't have $3000 just lying around, hell i don't even have $10 just lying around. Anyway, are you gunna do an epoxy coating on it or just leave it wood? And I never asked what kind of warwick is the 4 string?

Warwick Corvette, the Bubinga model. Dunno, I'll talk to the luthier and see what he advices.
#13
defrett the 4, even if u need a back up for the 5 u can do it on a fretless, plus it will further ur learning and what u r able to do, no set backs at all
#14
I would say you've already made up your mind. If you're going to get it professionally done, then go for it. Oh and by the way, polyurethane is far superior to epoxy on the neck if that's the route you decide.

Here's Fitz to tell you why:

"...Some may think 'oh, well, the epoxy is just for protection, I'll take my chances with bare wood.' Well, you can take a chance with by bare ass, because the epoxy on a fingerboard is as much about tone as it is about durability.

Now, there are 2 types of fingerboard finishes I would recommend: epoxy, like Jaco used (Pettit's Poly-Poxy, to be exact), or polyurethane/polyester. What do I recommend? Polyurethane/polyester. Unlike wood, it's not the composition of the material that gives the sound, it's what it does. Epoxy and poly will have the exact same effect on your tone. The major difference is how each finish deals with damage. Epoxy is meant more for impact damage, while poly is better for wear and tear. Because of this, epoxy tends to peel instead of chip or shatter, while poly tends to chip. There's no way the constant rubbing of strings will cause a material to chip. However, it will cause peeling. Therefore, poly is more suited for fingerboards (this is what the Artist model Jaco sig uses, as well as Pau Ferro, a stronger wood).
Now onto the sound impact. Bare wood is porous. It can 'absorb' the sound of strings. People tend to like the sound, but the aural properties of Jaco's fingerboard wood was made all-but irrelevant when the epoxy was applied. Sure, the wood will vibrate differently than another wood, but it won't absorb the sound. The epoxy 'growls back' all of the sound, and this results in a much more present and 'growly' tone. You simply won't get any of Jaco's sound without this kind of fingerboard."

(From his blog on Jaco's sound)
#18
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
He's at least as smart as thefitz... Which could be taken either way


I think in this case we shall actually consider it a good thing and since when did you become an expert on sound qualities of poly versus epoxy, or did you just steal it from someone else. Anyway, once you get it back from the luthier you should do some recordings i'm interested to hear how it sounds.
#19
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Good stuff. He's at least as smart as thefitz... Which could be taken either way. It's really your call.

Thanks, Bales, for quoting me there.

For the record, I'm getting my Warwick's truss rod replaced, but the ****ing company is taking forever to deliver it. It's driving me nuts.

In my humble opinion, active basses do not really lend themselves to flatwound strings. If you're going to coat the fingerboard, sure, but if you're not, just fix the truss rod. I'd recommend replacing the neck with a fretless, but that's a solid $375 and they take away your old neck.

As crazy as it sounds, Warwick never struck me as a fretless company. It's the bell brass frets that help getting that Warwick tone. If you're not in the market for that tone, try another bass altogether, as opposed to 'retrofitting' the Warwick to get a non-Warwick sound.

IMO I've had great experiences with the Jaco before, but last time I played it, I really preferred the American Deluxe fretless. You can get an MIA DX fretless and a 3rd party epoxy fingerboard for cheaper than the bloomin' Jaco sig. Maybe I'm currently out of love with it for a little while.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#21
Go on, do it you know you want to!

The bassist of the band at my uni's fresher's ball (ummm...long time ago...) had a Warwick Thumb 6-string fretless. I was quite impressed that he could rattle thro the covers they did, dressed as Elvis. I needed a jaw-winch after the cover of Ian Dury's "Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick". Not least 'cos he deployed his octaver to do the sax solo note-for-note. (If you don't know this track, get it downloaded NOW! Norman Watt-Roy's
bassline's an under-rated funk classic)
No other fretless Warwick I've heard has disappointed, bearing in mind that I do remember some of the godawful late 80's smooth jazz-pop crap that used such basses quite a bit. They were the only good bit about it!
#22
Quote by thunderbritches
I think in this case we shall actually consider it a good thing and since when did you become an expert on sound qualities of poly versus epoxy, or did you just steal it from someone else. Anyway, once you get it back from the luthier you should do some recordings i'm interested to hear how it sounds.

The day I tried the Jaco sig for the 10th time after owning a fretless Jazz bass with the same pickups and epoxied fingerboard. If you read my article, you'd know that there aren't really any tonal differences, and you'd know why. But God forbid you read before you come out and ask 'who the hell are you?'
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#24
Quote by thefitz
The day I tried the Jaco sig for the 10th time after owning a fretless Jazz bass with the same pickups and epoxied fingerboard. If you read my article, you'd know that there aren't really any tonal differences, and you'd know why. But God forbid you read before you come out and ask 'who the hell are you?'


I do apologize for not reading your article on it and not recognizing that jazzy actually wrote the post based on what you have written about the topic. Mr. fitz you have my most humble apology, and I had the post directed towards jazzy not yourself
#25
Quote by thunderbritches
I do apologize for not reading your article on it and not recognizing that jazzy actually wrote the post based on what you have written about the topic. Mr. fitz you have my most humble apology, and I had the post directed towards jazzy not yourself

We're good, we're good, it's just a misunderstanding.

Don't quote me on this, but poly might be easier (therefore cheaper) to apply than epoxy as well.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#26
i would say dont defret it wawicks have great fretless sounds but not as a defretted intrument. by friend has a fretless warwick corvett (standard fretless not de-fretted) and it is the best sounding fretless i have ever heard i would say buy one of those it is cheaper then the jaco sig and you wont be looked as "copying or being a wanna-be" or you can buy a cheaper fretless that is better then youre current one later. please leave defretting to basses that are cheapish that you dont really play but dont wanna sell.

also talk to the luthier about defretting ask him if the fretboard's wood and such will be good for fretless.
ESP B-405,Fender American Jazz Bass(EMG J active pups and LEO QUAN BADASS II ) squire P bass(EMG P active Pups)),
SansAmp Bass driver DI
Ampeg SvP PRO Tube Preamp
QSC2450 Power amp
Furman PL8
FINALLY-Ampeg SVT 810E
#27
Do it you pussy, you know you wanna, besides you never even play it anymore, plus your other fretless licks d1ck.
anyways if something goes wrong you could always pawn it off on some kid innocent kid
#28
Quote by Hunnybunny45
Do it you pussy, you know you wanna, besides you never even play it anymore, plus your other fretless licks d1ck.
anyways if something goes wrong you could always pawn it off on some kid innocent kid

You can't play the fretless in tune