#1
Hey guys, I've been playing guitar for 4 years, I've got a decent technique going and can phrase pretty well, but I have one critical problem. I stay in one "box". Those of you who know guitar scales probably know what I'm talking about. I've looked up on how to conquer this issue BUT there are about half a billion scales to learn. Which ones are essential for:

-SRV/Hendrix style soloing (Red House/Little Wing) and other blues
-Jimmy Page quick fast solos (e.g. Communication Breakdown/Whole Lotta Love)
-80s metal (Kirk Hammett style)

Thanks guys!
#2
learn obviously the blues scale from octave to octave box. IE (0 to 12) get so in twined with that with the scale from top to bottom that you can recall its third form in an instant. if you do that then you'll have 7 different scales by just learning how to play the blues scale from its entirity.

1 SRV and Hendrix used blues scale with added notes here and there but when you played and mastered the different forms of the same scale minor major hormonic blah blah blah.
2. jimmy page uses the blues pentatonic, so learn the inside out of his solos and start to rip off some of his licks and add some flavor with it with your new scale knowledge, and yes everyone has ripped off someone some how, if not steve vai with crazy melodic phrases to chuck berry with the standard 7b 5 5 thing to bob dylans chord progression and lyrics to beethovens sonatas to church hymns. what else would explain that feeling when you've heard a song for the first time but get the feeling that you've already heard it before.
3. hes the master of the pentatonic box, so i'd just listen to alot of metallica and also master the different shapes of the pentatonic scale. a mixolydian and a locrian wouldn't hurt either.
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#3
Scales aren't boxes or shapes. They are sets of intervals and span the entire fretboard. As always, refer to the signature:

Learn music theory! Learn the notes on the fretboard, and apply them to the formulas for scales, and suddenly you can play any scale anywhere on the fretboard.
#4
Scales aren't boxes or shapes. They are sets of intervals and span the entire fretboard. As always, refer to the signature:

very true sorry i didn't say that, but if i'm not mistaken i believe he's just refering to one scale, one box, and he like you just said could probably move it and play that same scale anywhere but he still doesn't know the formula or i would assume that he still doesn't know the proper formula to create a nice harmonic scale which ofcourse we both know is just a raised 7th note.
My Gear:
epiphone les paul cusom, Limited edition. evo dimarzio pick ups
Parker P-38
epiphone hummingbird
line 6 flextone
crate vtx 120

head full of ideas.
#5
Which is why I suggested to learn theory

You don't have to learn everything, hell, even I have a very basic grasp on it. The point is to learn how it works so you CAN figure stuff out, very much like math.
#6
well said cowboy
My Gear:
epiphone les paul cusom, Limited edition. evo dimarzio pick ups
Parker P-38
epiphone hummingbird
line 6 flextone
crate vtx 120

head full of ideas.
#7
Ah to clear up confusion, I do know that scales aren't "boxes", I refer to the box as my problem, is that I only stay in one box within one scale, but there are so many scales to learn (like ionian, phrygian, pentatonic, minor pentatonic, and all that stuff). Then, there are different "keys" to these scales. I'm wondering which ones are essential for each of the styles mentioned. e.g. jimi hendrix used E major pentatonic mainly (I don't know if this is true but just an example of an answer.) Thanks for the help guys!
#8
Quote by Shuk
Ah to clear up confusion, I do know that scales aren't "boxes", I refer to the box as my problem, is that I only stay in one box within one scale, but there are so many scales to learn (like ionian, phrygian, pentatonic, minor pentatonic, and all that stuff). Then, there are different "keys" to these scales. I'm wondering which ones are essential for each of the styles mentioned. e.g. jimi hendrix used E major pentatonic mainly (I don't know if this is true but just an example of an answer.) Thanks for the help guys!


Ah - you're misunderstanding things a little...you need to forget boxes. Completely.
Unless you're moving house. When you learn a box, you aren't actually learning a scale, you're just learning a part of a scale which exists all over the fretboard. Scales only contain a set number of notes, typically 7, or 5 for a pentatonic scale. When you reach the end of the pattern you just continue on the pattern from the octave of the first note. Then there's also the arrangement of the guitar's strings which means you can play exactly the same note (ie not even the octave) in several different places.

If you map out E minor pentatonic across the entire fretboard, bearing in mind thast once you get to the 12th fret everything just repeats itself an octave higher anyway, you get this...
http://www.theorylessons.com/pentpos.html
Now, that LOOKS complicated, but it isn't - it's just that guitarists tend to rush into scales without knowing how to learn them. The important things are the actual notes in the scale, the chords it relates to and also the intervals between them as they remain constant whereas physical fingering alters if you move a scale. Where you actually put your fingers is incidental. It looks complex, but it's just 5 simple notes repeating themselves in the same pattern. You can break it down into the 5 boxes shown for navigation purposes but it's vital to learn the theory behind it otherwise you'll never understand what to do with it or how it works. The most useful exercises I find are "horizontal" ones that take you through all the positions - they're a very effective way of breaking out of the box mentality and making your playing more fluid.

The first thing you need to do is learn the notes on the fretboard as that will allow you to play in different keys. Scale patterns are transposable, so to play in a differnent key you can just move the entire pattern so that the root notes are at the relevant frets.

You also need to start learning the major scale, as that's what gives you the reference point for learning other scales and also chord construction. DOn't worry about modes just yet - suffice to say that ultimately all they are is different faces of the major scale. If you learn the major scale thoroughly you eventually pretty much learn modes by default.
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#9
Read about chord tones (CAGED). They make the world simple. If you need some help breaking the box, PM me, and I'd really like to help.
#10
Quote by Shuk
I stay in one "box". Those of you who know guitar scales probably know what I'm talking about. I've looked up on how to conquer this issue BUT there are about half a billion scales to learn.


Well first of all, as you practice, so will you play. If you're just using a single
finger position... well, that's all you'll end up using if you don't practice anything else.

I think you're confused. There aren't a "half billion scales" to learn. In fact there
are probably like 2 for what you want to learn: the pentatonic will get you about
80% of the way there, and some major scale knowledge the rest of the 20%.

You just need to practice using the whole neck with any given scale.