#1
ok, so finally, after 4 years of playing (and sucking) i have decided to brush up on theory...

i don't know much about scales, but the thing that's bothering me the most is chords.

i only know 5th's (powerchords), major / minor chords, diminished, diminished 5th, and 7th chords. as well as whatever it is randy uses in crazy train... :s

i also know nothing of how to change around chords, in theory i mean...like, if i'm playing diminished chords, is it theoretically ok to switch to 9th chords at a certain point? and then on to *insert strange chord here*?


i'm mostly interested in metal and classical at the moment, so if you could keep it mostly relevant to that, then it would be great. (and it's 'dark' sounding metal too...nothing too happy :p

so could someone help me out a bit? i don't even know how to properly use the chords i do know, so i'm pretty lost.

cheers.

and sorry if i shouldn't be posting it. i'll delete it if it needs to be
Quote by B4Dkarma
When you look at a guy and immediately go, "wow, what a douchebag"

that is what girls find attractive.
#2
i would suggest getting a book from the library on this topic. it would be a ton to try and type what you need to know in here. basically its the same idea as playing scales. you need to find the notes in a particular scale and then pick some to put together that seem to sound like what you want. always experiment with different chords. in my opinion the goal is to come up with something original sounding. just using stock progressions makes a stock song. check out the circle of fifths also.
#3
Here's an article on basic progressions that you might find useful: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_to/absolute_beginners_guide_to_chord_progressions.html

You might also like one on cadences: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/music_theory/how_about_cadences.html

It's basic, but it's a start.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#4
sowhat: i already have 2 books and have read through several books i have been lent by friends and aquaintances, none of them really help me out...the majority of them say about basic major / minor chords, and occasionally 7th and 9th chords, and then chuck a chord dictionary in the back.

psychodelia: the first article was more what i am looking for, but goddamn that's hard to wrap my head around . shows how little i know about theory...
i know a bit about cadences already though.


so building up chords from scales i like sounds like a pretty good idea...but i had a thought. if the church modes are just the major scale starting at a different place on the neck, then playing a song entirely in a certain mode would be the same as playing a song in the major scale, wouldn't it?

to me the whole idea only seems to work if you play a song in the normal major scale, with some bits in a different mode.


i might have that all wrong though

cheers
Quote by B4Dkarma
When you look at a guy and immediately go, "wow, what a douchebag"

that is what girls find attractive.
#5
dean here im new to this site bit ive been teaching guitar for 17 years.

what you need to do is know what every note is doing in the chord shape.
then if you need to sharpen the 5th say, you know which note to change.
#6
Quote by pistols
so building up chords from scales i like sounds like a pretty good idea...but i had a thought. if the church modes are just the major scale starting at a different place on the neck, then playing a song entirely in a certain mode would be the same as playing a song in the major scale, wouldn't it?
No, although the notes are the same, the intervals and the chord backing it is different. Its the melody and the chord that makes the mode, a mode isn't just seven notes. Sort of hard to explain.
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#7
Quote by deanguitardean
dean here im new to this site bit ive been teaching guitar for 17 years.

what you need to do is know what every note is doing in the chord shape.
then if you need to sharpen the 5th say, you know which note to change.


alright, i'll have a go at this.
but i haven't learned any theory in ages, and i suck at it, so i need something to be clarified for me...

the 5th, 7th, whatever, that's pretty much the same for a chord as it is for a scale right?

so if i'm playing a dminor, then the 7th of that chord would be the 7th degree of the d minor scale?


but if that's it, what's the deal with 9th and 13th chords, and all them? i never heard about 9th scale degrees, 13th, etc etc.
Quote by B4Dkarma
When you look at a guy and immediately go, "wow, what a douchebag"

that is what girls find attractive.
#8
Quote by pistols
alright, i'll have a go at this.
but i haven't learned any theory in ages, and i suck at it, so i need something to be clarified for me...

the 5th, 7th, whatever, that's pretty much the same for a chord as it is for a scale right?

so if i'm playing a dminor, then the 7th of that chord would be the 7th degree of the d minor scale?


but if that's it, what's the deal with 9th and 13th chords, and all them? i never heard about 9th scale degrees, 13th, etc etc.


You need to realise all chords stem from the major scale, so if your playing D minor use the D major scale to find out what notes you need. For a Dm7 you need 1 b3 5 b7.. from the D major scale. You can do it from the minor but it can just complicate thinsg if you get into more advanced chords.
The 9th is the second scale degree, 11th = 4th and 13th=6th.
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.