#2
say you have a D7. the 3rd and minor 7th are a tritone (the minor 7 is a b5 away from a major 3rd). basically, a tritone sub is using any chord that still contain those two notes, such as a F#dim, that contains an f# (major 3 of D7, root of F# dim) and C (minor 7 of D7, b5 of F#dim).

try playing a ii-V-I progression and sub the V for that.
instead of: a-7 d7 gmaj7
try: a-7 f#dim gmaj7
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#3
You look up "tri-tone substitution" and tell me what you find. Because when I did, all it came up with was tri-tone. Honestly, not trying to be a jackass, but stop being a dickhead.


Edit: Thanks Doug, I was out today and in music theory we did these. I just wanted to be caught up for tomorrow.
Last edited by SchecterAbuser7 at Sep 20, 2007,
#4
Tritone substitution is when you substitute a dominant seventh chord for another dominant seventh chord three tones (a tritone) higher. This is a commonly used tool in Jazz; it works due to the fact that the replaced chord shares the same notes that make it "dominant" (the tritone between the third and the seventh).

For example, if you had a C7 chord, it would consist of the following notes...
C E G Bb
The E and the Bb forming a tritone and giving the dominant chord its characteristic sound.
The tritonic substitute for C7 is F#7, and it contains the following notes...
F# A# C# E
The notes that give it the characteristic dominant sound are the same in both chords, albeit in reverse. It's not an entirely common effect but it's fun nonetheless and has an interesting sound that can add character to an otherwise generic chord progression when used right.
People writing songs that voices never shared
No one dared
Disturb the Sound of Silence
#5
Quote by Me2NiK
Tritone substitution is when you substitute a dominant seventh chord for another dominant seventh chord three tones (a tritone) higher. This is a commonly used tool in Jazz; it works due to the fact that the replaced chord shares the same notes that make it "dominant" (the tritone between the third and the seventh).

For example, if you had a C7 chord, it would consist of the following notes...
C E G Bb
The E and the Bb forming a tritone and giving the dominant chord its characteristic sound.
The tritonic substitute for C7 is F#7, and it contains the following notes...
F# A# C# E
The notes that give it the characteristic dominant sound are the same in both chords, albeit in reverse. It's not an entirely common effect but it's fun nonetheless and has an interesting sound that can add character to an otherwise generic chord progression when used right.
Would you play the C7 chord and the F#7 chord at the same time or do you take the C7 chord out and play the F#7?
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#6
You wouldn't sound them both at the same time (that would sound ridiculously bad), you would play one or the other -- in order to apply tritone substitution, if you would normally lpay a C7 you would play an F#7, and vice versa.
People writing songs that voices never shared
No one dared
Disturb the Sound of Silence