#1
Ok guys heres the deal,


I'm in a total writing slump, well almost always have been. I feel I've had too many songs started that haven't been finished, and that i can't write anything worthy of what I'm looking to write. I like a lot of metal, hard rock, and i try to take a lot of my influences from bands like Sabbath, AC/DC, Slayer, Mastodon, and Led Zep. Though I don't have a particular taste for Blues i do seem to have an easier time writing simple blues songs. I know their essentially similar, but I just can't make that translation. Also all my songs are extremely generic, usually no change in rhythm (8th note, 8th note etc), sticking around the same power chords, chugging along on the open E string. Also, writing good melodies for the rhythm parts, first i guess i should work on rhythm parts than find good melodies but still lead parts are also a trouble i'd like to work on. I'd like to change my songwriting ability, because I see many people that write good metal songs in a flash, but for me, It's just hard, and it puts me down, like I wasn't Meant to do stuff like that. Any advice, i really would appreciate it.
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#2
May I suggest looking at the guest columns. There's one on the front page called "How To Avoid Musical Burn Out," which might help you. (Well, hopefully.)
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#3
ive felt that way for like the past month.

ive been coming up with a few riffs here and there and fit together but not a whole song at once. i think its because im challenging myself to write more progressive metal along the lines of between the buried and me.
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#4
Know how to play a piano? Harmonica? Know where to find a classical station on the radio? Or jazz? Ever try playing in the dark?

See it yet?

Hmm?

hehe..I'm trying to get you to read between the lines...think outside the box...is this page half empty or half full?

Do something different. Play a different instrument. Play the same one but in the dark. Listen to something completely unusual. Show tunes. Jazz. Classical. Cyndi Lauper even...no, don't go that far...

Get outta the rut. Change of scenery is the prescription. Go to a music store and pick up a banjo. Learn to play recorder. They cost maybe $10, probably more like 5.
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#5
The article helped a little but im more focused on writing music, i just can't quite find the right riffs, licks and structure that make a good song.
My Gear:

Jackson DXMG
Jackson KVX10
Hoyer Acoustic
Randall RG100ES
ZW-45 Zakk Wylde Crybaby

WARNING!: Every thread i touch dies.......
#6
start listening to other kinds of music. start playing other kinds of music. take what you've learned from other types of music and apply it to playing whatever style you truly love (metal, I assume).

just experiment. if you feel like you've hit a road block, take a different road.
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#7
The article helped a little but im more focused on writing music, i just can't quite find the right riffs, licks and structure that make a good song.


You've probably set yourself a standard that is too high. The most important thing to do when you are learning to write is to keep it simple, and I mean REALLY simple. Start writing simple 5-9note melodies or so and analyze what makes them soung good. Do you outline a chord? What is the tonality? If you are outlining a chord, what voicing? Is it mostly stepwise motion or are there many leaps and what occurs after the leaps? Start asking simple questions like that with each simple melody you write and answer them. You'll find that you'll grow rather comfortable doing this rather quickly, and with those melodies you like, add harmony, either thinking chordally or in seperate voices.

You will also want to grab a bunch of pieces by your favorite artists and analyze them, maybe not harmonically (though feel free too) but structurally, look for the repetition of a certain phrase, and the development of that phrase, simply look for patterns and what not.

And finally, improvise everday.
#8
Don't force yourself- you may be fairly experienced as a guitarist, but you're a novice as far as songwriting goes. Like anything you get better with experience so you shouldn't expect your first songs to be 7-minute multi-layered epics. The more songs you write the better you'll get at it, but your first attempts WILL be pretty rubbish, just as your first attempts to play the guitar were.
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#9
Hey mate, I was in the same situation as you. I just sat with my guitar and got depressed because I couldn't think of anything good, but then I thought: "What makes a memorable song memorable?" and I was thinking that if you just had the guitar part of a lot of songs they would sound pretty generic and uninterseting. It's the rest of the band that can make a song. If you don't have a band, have an interesting rhythm in your head for your song and program the beat on Beatcraft or a similar program. Even just have a cool beat behind an otherwise fairly generic song can make it sound awesome. They when you consider melody and bass, you can really have an awesome song from a bare-bones guitar track. My main tip for you would be to ALWAYS be thinking about what would be accompanying the guitar track you are writing.
#10
try listening to some different styles of music to get a different perspective. and also remember everyone has their ups and downs, you'll pull out of the slump soon enough
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#11
Learning a bit of theory helps an amazing amount. It's weird (and most people would say "bleh nerd, theory is ****.)

However knowin some theory is good because when you do find yourself in a slump, you can simply write whatever in a mathematical way. you never get what you would have expected, but it's different and it sounds good because it follows the theory.


I also liked what Paleo Pete had to say about think outside the box, learnin a different instrument etc.
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#12
Also all my songs are extremely generic, usually no change in rhythm (8th note, 8th note etc), sticking around the same power chords, chugging along on the open E string.


Well then, you know the problem! Pick up a time signature, say, 5/8, and play different note durations. For example, in a 5/8, there are 5 eighth notes, right? However, 1 8th note = 2 16th notes.

So, play something like SS-E-SS-EE

S = 16th
E = 8th
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