#1
So I just got new strings for my guitar, and after I put them on and tune them, I notice my D-string sounds funky. So I check the inotation and it is flat (which is odd because it wasn't off with my old strings, which were the same gauge). So I bring the saddle up, making the string length shorter, but its still flat. I continue to bring the saddle up until it reaches it's limit and the inotation is still flat.

Does anyone know what is going on with my guitar?
Last edited by Sleepn_Giant at Sep 22, 2007,
#2
Unusual, but I've seen it happen. Strings dead right out of the box. Sometimes strings may sit on the shelf for a long time before you buy them, and especially in more humid areas there is a chance they can be rusted or just simply dead before you buy them. I'd take it (guitar and all) to the place you got the strings and see if they will replace them. Sounds like they were dead to begin with. I got an acoustic set like that about a year ago, tuning was out the window from the minute I put them on.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#3
Quote by Paleo Pete
Unusual, but I've seen it happen. Strings dead right out of the box. Sometimes strings may sit on the shelf for a long time before you buy them, and especially in more humid areas there is a chance they can be rusted or just simply dead before you buy them. I'd take it (guitar and all) to the place you got the strings and see if they will replace them. Sounds like they were dead to begin with. I got an acoustic set like that about a year ago, tuning was out the window from the minute I put them on.


As an Ernie Ball employee told me a few years ago: "making strings isn't exactly rocket science".

If you combine the fact that some bad strings can make it through quality control with the average period a pack of strings can spend on the shelf, it's not so hard to imagine your going to run into a bad set sooner or later. Most stores are friendly enough to replace them though, so like Paleo Pete said, simply take your guitar to the place you bought them.

Also, if they don't want to help you, most major string manufacturing companies have policies about bad strings, so they will most likely offer you a replacement.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#4
if it's a distance to the shop, or it's a while until you cant get a lift there, ect, give the string time to settle. make sure it's in the slot correctly. stretch the string.

how far off is it? is the tuning changing at all? how long ago did you string it? which way does the saddle point (if it's a TOM)
Jenneh

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#5
Thanks for the info. I think I'll bring it to the shop today and see if they can replace it. I know someone there pretty well, so hopefully they are working there today, hehe.

Its funny, and annoying that this happened when it did, because I was restringing the guitar the night before I need to go to my Jazz Band rehearsals and so now this morning I need to go before I can go to the shop. I tuned the D-string up slightly, so chords sound decent around the neck, so it should last me the morning, hehe.