#1
Hi, i need a little help in both A major and minor scale's theory.

I know how are they form, but can i ask how why are they form this way?
#2
Well you have the major scale formula W W H W W W H and this gives you the A mjor scale. The A minor scales formula is W H W W H W W but its better to think of it as the relative minor of C major, or its 6th mode. So you write of C major scale, C D E F G A B C then start on the 6th degree and write out the same notes giving you A B C D E F G A
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#3
but can i ask how why are they form this way?


Certain formulae are applied to notes to get certain scales.

The major scale =
W W H W W W H


Minor =
W H W W H W W
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#4
sorry i think i may need a little help here.

Isn't A major goes like this: A B C# D E F# G# A

speaking of the connection with W W H W W W H, i am quite confuse with the last 2 W behind, why do they become F# and G#?

sry my theory sux..
#6
Quote by majora
why does A minor contain lesser 'notes' than A major? how does it apply to the theory of W H W W H W W?

That is your pentatonic scale - it only contains 5 notes of the scale.
#7
okay, don't think in terms of any one note being "first." think in intervals. an interval is the heard distance between any two notes, and it's the easiest way to understand scale theory. For this example, let's use E as our root note, or starting note.

if you go up the neck fret by fret on the E string, the 12 notes go like this:

e, f, f#, g, g#, a, a#, b, c, c#, d, d#, e.

intervals for this order of notes would be as follows:

E - root note
F - minor second
F# - major second
G - minor third
G# - major third
A - fourth
A# - augmented 4th / diminished 5th
B - fifth
C - minor sixth
C# - major sixth
D - minor seventh
D# - major seventh
E - Octave

so, besides the octave, the major seventh is the greatest "distance" from the root note, because it is 11 frets away. the order (root to octave) would stay the same if we started from any note. for example, C is only the minor 6th in this case because E is the root.

the root, fourth and fifth are neither minor nor major. they will be the same interval in any key. for now, don't worry about the augmented 4th. you will notice that some intervals are minor, and some are major. These are the ones that form your scales. it's mainly the 3rd, 6th and 7th that will determine your major / minor qualities. the second is usually (but not always) left as major, because a minor second is too "close" to the root and can cause unwanted dissonance.

for example, almost all scales (definitely the major and minor scales) contain the root note, the fourth and the fifth. these intervals are the base of western composition and harmony. if you wanted to play an E major scale, use the major intervals...

E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D# E

if you wanted to play a minor scale, you would switch your major intervals for minors. a quick study of the pattern shows that to make any major interval minor, just lower it one fret. now your scale would read

E, F# (because we keep the major 2nd), G, A, B, C, D E

remember that we don't need to change the root, fourth or fifth, because they are neither major nor minor.

so that's how to play and find scales on one string. Want more strings? Your guitar is tuned to fourths, so the same fret on your next highest string is your fourth. if you know that, you can find your fifth two frets higher than that, your thirds will be towards the headstock from that fourth and so on...

remember to think backwards; intervals aren't just ascending. if you start on a G (3rd fret e string), and then play the second fret, you are playing the major seventh. the notes loop forever in both directions. all you need is to know where your root note is, and with practice, you can play in any direction and always be in key.
Last edited by frigginjerk at Sep 24, 2007,
#8
thank you very much frigginjerk, i a, beginning to understand. Aso i have found out that the 2nd link in ur sig is very usefully.. gonna do a read up.

will post here again id i have any problems. cheers!
#10
^ I agree, that's an awesome link. Where are all these theory of the month articles?
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#12
Hi guys, i have a couple of qns.

-If lets say i am playing B major, can i use the 2nd fret of the A string(B note) as the root note instead of the 7th fret of the low E string? In other words, can i jump the root note around or is it that all rote notes are to be in the low E string?

-Is there such thing as major and minor scale of minor root note? like the major of C minor or the minor of D minor?
Last edited by majora at Sep 26, 2007,
#13
Quote by majora
-If lets say i am playing B major, can i use the 2nd fret of the A string(B note) as the root note instead of the 7th fret of the low E string? In other words, can i jump the root note around or is it that all rote notes are to be in the low E string?

-Is there such thing as major and minor scale of minor root note? like the major of C minor or the minor of D minor?

The answer to question 1 is yes, of course. Any note of B can have a scale following it. It doesn't have to be on the E string. This is why on the guitar you get scales in different positions.

I don't understand your 2nd question.
#14
Quote by Chris_Sleeps
The answer to question 1 is yes, of course. Any note of B can have a scale following it. It doesn't have to be on the E string. This is why on the guitar you get scales in different positions.

I don't understand your 2nd question.

Thanks.

Sorry, i have to rephrase my 2nd qn.

What i am trying to say was that can i use A# or C# as the root note?

I have another qn in my mind.. can we play from scale to scale? meaning can we play the A major scale then suddenly change to A minor scale?

thanks for ur patience guys!
#15
Quote by majora
What i am trying to say was that can i use A# or C# as the root note?

I have another qn in my mind.. can we play from scale to scale? meaning can we play the A major scale then suddenly change to A minor scale?

On the guitar what you essentially do is learn a scale and then move the root note, yes. The major scale on the guitar looks exactly the same, whatever root note you are starting on.

Can you play from scale to scale? If you are playing a guitar solo/melody you have to stay in key, so you need to play the right scale there. If you are practicing play any scale you want.