#1
**i'm not sure where this goes**

Im curious to know if customizing/ designing and painting guitars make much money **like through business etc**
also how do you get into that kind of business or is it just a hobby thing?
#2
I don't think guitar luthiers as they're called make massive amounts of money, you can get like a few hundred from making one guitar but the problem is you can't make a lot of guitars by yourself so you can only make big bucks if you have your own guitar "factory" as it were. And that's not likely to happen for a long time if your lucky. The best way to get into that sort of business would be to buy some DECENT tools and materials (including hardware.) Then if you haven't done much woodowork before, get some cheap wood to practice carving, routing and finishing on. Once your confident to do the same with a slab of expensive mahogany and flame maple, then build it. In fact build a couple. Give one of them away for free or cheap to someone in a quite good local band or something, that way people will think "if it's good enough for him..." Advertise your new business everywhere you can. Whether it will make a career for you, i don't know but i'm sure you can make a bit of money if you do it right at least.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#3
Theres a luthier on here with a proper business set up making guitars.

His names Perry Ormsby, he might be able to give you some pointers on telling you how to get started.
#4
After you build your first original design, give a lot of thought to what you might do differently (different, easier order of construction) for the next one. Build the next one using any new ideas or refinements. Then as you build yet another, build some jigs to reduce the time it will take on the fourth, fifth, etc. Jigs are time-consuming to make, as they must be accurate and durable. Also, as someone wisely suggested, get the best tools money can buy, and learn how to use them to the fullest of their capability. An apprentice mechanic spends virtually all his salary for years on tools. Fortunately, Snap-On doesn't make tools for guitars, so your cash outlay won't cripple you, but spending lots of money as you go on tools until you are fully equipped is necessary.

Don't get into it for the money - do it because you truly love doing it. If you are good and passionate about what you do, the rest will follow, but think about a day job to finance it all first. Your cash flow is guaranteed to be negative for quite some time.
#5
Quote by Dark_Merlin
Theres a luthier on here with a proper business set up making guitars.

His names Perry Ormsby, he might be able to give you some pointers on telling you how to get started.


that would be me :P

The only reason i survived the first two years, is because my fiance (we have since split) and i had worked real hard to pay our mortgage a year in advance, and she got a pay rise EQUAL to my entire years wage at the time (err, before quitting my job to be a 'luthier'). That meant i could 'muck around' for a year or so without having to worry about bills, rent/mortgage, car payments, or any of the things that get in the way.
It takes years to build up a reputation before you can charge enough to make a living. I was really lucky, in the fact there is no competition for electric guitars in my home state, and there were only a few repairers. For the first couple years, i lost money. For the third year, i broke even... just. In that same time i saw a bunch of guys start guitar making/repairing businesses, and all failed. Last year i spent $60,000 on moving to a new factory and new machinery, just so i can employ an assistant to try and keep up with the workload. Unless you have a whole swag of employees, you wont ever get "rich" making guitars. But, you'll be too busy running a business to be able to build yourself...
You can certainly make a reasonable living, if you have the right business mind, are lucky, and are good with your hands. The ability to make/repair is only 1/4 of what you will need to be able to survive.

Regards,
Perry Ormsby

Pevious builds:
HERE!