#1
been playing for just over a year but i'm pretty sure i could be a much better player
any tips on what kind of material to use? or something like that
wow...COOKIES!!
#2
Sorry, I find that a bit vague, care to explain more? I'm not being awkward by the way, I'm just interested in what you mean by 'material to use or something like that'. Cheers
signature
#3
yeah, we need more to go on
The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.
#5
www.bassplayer.tv has some alright stuff.

Go to a book shop, try find some jazz bass beginner books. Thats what you want to be learning, scales and music theory etc.

Learn from my mistake. Self-tought for two years now and I still dont know and am only just getting started in music theory.
Quote by charvel_man
"My lovely lady lumps"
What the **** are lady lumps? What does she have, breast cancer?

Bacchus basses FTW!
www.japanvintageguitars.com
#7
I call it the bass forum.

Seriously, an hour in the evenings when you otherwise would not be playing, make notes from the experienced guys regarding technique etc and then put it into practise the next day.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#8
Quote by IndianRockStar
Get a teacher.

I know it seems so easy, but nothing really is easy.


God yes. A teacher will be able to help you not only with music theory but technique and push you to the next level in a much shorter time period and with better results in the long run.
#10
Quote by anarkee
God yes. A teacher will be able to help you not only with music theory but technique and push you to the next level in a much shorter time period and with better results in the long run.


Yep... nothing motivates you than knowing that you're paying for it.

But in all seriousness, a good teacher should be able to see any faults in your technique, and improve you in a much faster time than teaching yourself can.
#11
No teachers, thats the easy way out, some of the best underground bassists havnt been taught.
A decent bassist keeps it easy why do you need to know awquard leave that to the guitarist.
#12
Teacher's are the easy way out? Au Contraire. Teachers make you work far harder than if you didn't have a teacher. How is getting help from somebody an easy way out. It's called get the most out of your practise time.
#13
I will give you a concrete example. I had to learn a funk piece for class. I thought I nailed it cold. Went to class, and then after I played it, my teacher goes...."well play me it with deadnotes on the alternate beats, and in open string position. And if you used this finger here and that finger there, that would smooth out your approach and make it more efficient".

And yes, while my version sounded good, with his constructive criticism, it sounded WAY better. Good teachers are great mentors --they give your the benefit of their experience and expertise and push you beyond your comfort zone.
#14
Quote by lastknownsurviv
No teachers, thats the easy way out, some of the best underground bassists havnt been taught.
A decent bassist keeps it easy why do you need to know awquard leave that to the guitarist.


You make it sound like getting a teacher makes you worse. Doesn't at all. And since when is making it easier a bad thing? It speeds up your progress.

I got a teacher a couple months ago, and it was a very smart move.
#15
I'm self-taught. With that in mind, my advice is also get a teacher.

Not doing so is sort of like marching into the mountains with no map and the wrong kind of boots on. You know where you want to go, but you'll only get there by trial and error, constantly doubling back on yourself, stumbling over rocks and getting pissed off and tired. If you get there at all.

A good teacher won't try and make you climb his mountain. He'll just show you the best way to climb yours.

That translates roughly into... with a teacher, you'll make a lot less mistakes, form less bad habits, learn proper technique (and avoid nasty strain injuries), understand what you're doing and why it works... all vital tools to help you develop your own style and grow as a musician.

If you absolutely cannot get a teacher, and I mean can't, not won't, then pick up as many DVD's, bass technique books and theory books as you can afford, read them cover to cover, over and over, and work through the exercises religiously and you might just get by.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
Last edited by Caustic at Sep 29, 2007,
#17
yeah im in the same boat but for some reason im keeping up with my guitarist who's been playing just as long but hes tutored. i don't mean just being able to play as efficiently and as accurately but we can actually have guitar battles and i come out on top half the time....

but yes a teacher would help u no end as it would me
I am me. Live with it.