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#1
I am almost 18 years old and I am about to start learning guitar. Should I even bother?

I plan on playing some decent jazz/metal/prog fusion **** (I have some things planned out already). However the guitarists I have used for inspiration started playing in their early teens (or maybe even before), and considering their current ages... I won't be doing anything worth the practice until I'm just too old to bother continuing.

The only reason I am even learning is to perform(and I mean seriously... not just a part-time thing), and it is looking more-and-more everyday like I won't be able to do that.

By my standards, am I wasting my time?
#2
I don't really think there's an age limit bud. You never know anyway, you might learn really quick? If you feel like starting guitar, just go for it. That way you'll know for sure.
#3
It isn't a waste of time to pursue a passion. =\

And if you got the cash, start out with a Epiphone Les Paul Custom.
#4
I don't really think there's an age limit bud.

I actually plan to make a band based on my chosen sound. I don't want to be 'the old guy.' Of course there are many musicians in their thirties/forties, however they are the 'veterans.'

You never know anyway, you might learn really quick? If you feel like starting guitar, just go for it.

Where would be a good place to start in order to gauge my capacity?

That way you'll know for sure.

That uncertainty is my actual problem.
#5
if your passionate about it and like what you're doing, i'ts pointless to think things like that. do it man and stop wasting time whining!
Pamposh’s final question before drifting into a state of transcendent ecstasy was, “But Master, if everything is an illusion, then why does anything matter?”

To which the master replied, “It may all be an illusion, but it’s a very real illusion.”
#6
go ahead and start. if u focus on certain things and lean theory early, then u can do at least most of what u want, if not all of it. Like if u focus on scale and speed exercizes, then u could easily be doing good, quick stuff in several years, not several decades.
#7
It isn't a waste of time to pursue a passion. =\

To get me off of a passion (I am an artist, and everything I do is based on it... I can't stand 'legitimate work'), I have to be pretty disheartened. I guess I have space dementia.

And if you got the cash, start out with a Epiphone Les Paul Custom.

I got a Squier Bullet.

There is no point in wasting money on a guitar you know you are going to replace.

go ahead and start. if u focus on certain things and lean theory early, then u can do at least most of what u want, if not all of it. Like if u focus on scale and speed exercizes, then u could easily be doing good, quick stuff in several years, not several decades.

Have any links to get me going in the right direction?
Last edited by G O go G O at Sep 22, 2007,
#8
Never too late, my friend. I started a year ago and I'm 32! As for gauging your capacity, you'll pretty much reap what you sow, meaning that your achievements will be proportional to the amount work you put into learning and practicing. Be diligent and don't let yourself be discouraged if things don't take as quickly as you would like. Mastering guitar takes years and even the greats have to practice often.
#10
Finding a good teacher would be a nice place to start. You can always supplement that with how-to DVD's(lots of them on Netflix) and lessons here on UGtv and Youtube. Also, don't be genre-specific. You'll be a much more well-rounded player if you learn other styles in addition to your chosen area. By the way, how would you characterize your "chosen sound?"
Last edited by teegee420 at Sep 22, 2007,
#11
I've heard some guy on hear taught lessons and he started teaching some guy just starting in his 60s or 70s... there is definately no age limit.
#12
To fulfill your full potential, it is too late. That's not to say you can't still be a competent, if not very good guitarist. You'll just have to work about ten times harder
#13
Quote by teegee420
Finding a good teacher would be a nice place to start. You can always supplement that with how-to DVD's(lots of them on Netflix) and lessons here on UGtv and Youtube. Also, don't be genre-specific. You'll be a much more well-rounded player if you learn other styles in addition to your chosen area. By the way, how would you characterize your "chosen sound?"

I would rather be self-taught to be honest.

And my sound is a fusion of Jazz, Metal, and Prog (and a few other genres depending on if I am depressed or angry at the time of writing it).

It is nothing specific, but I really have no desire to play another man's song.

I've heard some guy on hear taught lessons and he started teaching some guy just starting in his 60s or 70s... there is definately no age limit.

Age isn't my real problem.

To fulfill your full potential, it is too late. That's not to say you can't still be a competent, if not very good guitarist. You'll just have to work about ten times harder

I know that, but is it worth it? That was my original point, is all the work going to pay off soon enough for me to use it the way I want to?
Last edited by G O go G O at Sep 22, 2007,
#14
rubbish, hes 18 not 80 ffs
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#15
Quote by G O go G O
I am almost 18 years old and I am about to start learning guitar. Should I even bother?.....

By my standards, am I wasting my time?.....


Hey dude im 23 years old and i just started, it depends on how passionate you are to learn... you may learn fast, or you may just quiet next month.... if you really love it go for it... set your mind you'll do it... that's what i do. i used to think i was too old for it but there's really no age. you may not ever lead a band but the satisfaction of playing it with your friends or it becoming a hobby is satiscfactory... at least for me it is....

go for it dude... let's see who becomes at least an intermediate player sooner, i challenge you...!!!!
#16
Hey dude im 23 years old and i just started, it depends on how passionate you are to learn... you may learn fast, or you may just quiet next month.... if you really love it go for it... set your mind you'll do it... that's what i do. i used to think i was too old for it but there's really no age. you may not ever lead a band but the satisfaction of playing it with your friends or it becoming a hobby is satiscfactory... at least for me it is....

Actually, the only reason I'm starting is to lead a band >_>

go for it dude... let's see who becomes at least an intermediate player sooner, i challenge you...!!!!

Ok, what is your e-mail address?
#17
Quote by G O go G O
Actually, the only reason I'm starting is to lead a band >_>


Ok, what is your e-mail address?


kobain_plusa and the usual hot stuff....!!!
#19
Quote by G O go G O
It is nothing specific, but I really have no desire to play another man's song.


That's healthy and unhealthy at the same time. Healthy because it encourages your creativity at an early stage in your technical development, and unhealthy because there is nothing like learning a solo to raise your self-esteem and acquire technical knowledge.

Quote by gishuk
rubbish, hes 18 not 80 ffs

I've done lots of research into this, and yes, it is too late for him to reach his full potential. His muscles are fully developed by now, most likely, so have lost the elastic and adaptable properties they had 5-10 years ago. And there's also mental conditioning, and the much more obvious stuff like he doesn't have the time he did when he was 12.
#20
Quote by National_Anthem
That's healthy and unhealthy at the same time. Healthy because it encourages your creativity at an early stage in your technical development, and unhealthy because there is nothing like learning a solo to raise your self-esteem and acquire technical knowledge.

Meh. If I like it, I will try it. But when you make your own it is so much easier to learn.

Quote by National_Anthem
I've done lots of research into this, and yes, it is too late for him to reach his full potential. His muscles are fully developed by now, most likely, so have lost the elastic and adaptable properties they had 5-10 years ago. And there's also mental conditioning, and the much more obvious stuff like he doesn't have the time he did when he was 12.

/lesigh
#21
Quote by G O go G O
Meh. If I like it, I will try it. But when you make your own it is so much easier to learn.


No, really, I think it's a great thing, just I think you may be missing out if you don't learn some solos etc. Tom Morrello did exactly the same thing as you, just I think especially if you're starting out, learning songs will be less frustrating. Do you have any musical experience, theory, different instrument? If no, definitely learn songs first, you'll save time in the long run
Quote by G O go G O

/lesigh


You can still be a great guitarist, just not as good as you could have been, that's my point.
#22
Quote by G O go G O
I am almost 18 years old and I am about to start learning guitar. Should I even bother?

I plan on playing some decent jazz/metal/prog fusion **** (I have some things planned out already). However the guitarists I have used for inspiration started playing in their early teens (or maybe even before), and considering their current ages... I won't be doing anything worth the practice until I'm just too old to bother continuing.

The only reason I am even learning is to perform(and I mean seriously... not just a part-time thing), and it is looking more-and-more everyday like I won't be able to do that.

By my standards, am I wasting my time?

I don't think you're wasting your time, and it's certainly never too late to learn. However, I personally think you're setting your goals too rigidly. You should approach the guitar with an open mind and to a certain degreee allow the instrument itself to guide you. We all have our favourite styles of music to listen to, and preferred artists - however it doesn't necessarily follow that the music we'll end up making will be the same. You ghave to spend some time just getting used to the guitar and finding out how it inspires you.

Also you should never discount learning other people's stuff - that's the best way to learn as it allows you to see techniques and theory in practice...when you see how things can be used it gives you a helping hand to using it yourself.

If you're taking up the guitar with the sole purpose of fronting a band then I honestly wouldn't bother - it's not the kind of thing you can plan that way. You just have to want to learn to play the guitar - where it's going to take you is an unwritten book.
Actually called Mark!

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#23
No, really, I think it's a great thing, just I think you may be missing out if you don't learn some solos etc. Tom Morrello did exactly the same thing as you, just I think especially if you're starting out, learning songs will be less frustrating. Do you have any musical experience, theory, different instrument? If no, definitely learn songs first, you'll save time in the long run
Morello is the reason I feel that way (if someone can be a great guitarist without playing anything really technical or difficult, then he must know something).

Any links to some exercises/scales/whatever that I could do right now?

Quote by National_Anthem
You can still be a great guitarist, just not as good as you could have been, that's my point.

How much harder will I have to practice if I want to be an at least mentionable guitarist. I don't want to be Paul Gilbert (although it would be nice), but I want to at least be able to do what I do well.

If you're taking up the guitar with the sole purpose of fronting a band then I honestly wouldn't bother - it's not the kind of thing you can plan that way.

Opinion noted. However, I really want to learn to be at least worthwhile.

However the learning-the-guitar idea came after the fact that I realized I can't sing. Also, I want to be able to express myself through a bad ass instrument (and I mean literally... like maybe carry it around with me and add a soundtrack to wherever I am). I can't just let my idea die, now can I?
Last edited by G O go G O at Sep 22, 2007,
#24
Opinion noted. However, I really want to learn to be at least worthwhile.

However the learning-the-guitar idea came after the fact that I realized I can't sing. Also, I want to be able to express myself through a bad ass instrument (and I mean literally... like maybe carry it around with me and add a soundtrack to wherever I am). I can't just let my idea die, now can I?

To be honest that looks like motiviation enough for me - as long as you want to play the thing you'll get somewhere. Just be prepared to REALLY suck for a time before the thing begins to make sense. The first 6 months are the most frustrating and are ultimately what make or break you, if you're determined enough to soldier on through those you'll start to see results.
Actually called Mark!

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#25
Quote by G O go G O
What is the domain?


the usual hot mail stuff.... just thought you'd figure it out... sorry...
#26
Quote by G O go G O

Morello is the reason I feel that way (if someone can be a great guitarist without playing anything really technical or difficult, then he must know something).

Any links to some exercises/scales/whatever that I could do right now?


How much harder will I have to practice if I want to be an at least mentionable guitarist. I don't want to be Paul Gilbert (although it would be nice), but I want to at least be able to do what I do well.


Exercises, make up your own. Say, if you want to work on alternate picking just set yourself a problem (as in a maths problem) then try to "solve" it. To make something easy, you have to make it much more difficult first, so when your exercise becomes easy, complicate it.I believe there's a Joe Satriani book with quite a few of his teaching methods and exercises, look into that, he seems like a good teacher. EDIT:And in terms of practise, who can say? I practise violin 4 hours a day, guitar only 1 hour, and I'm 16.
Last edited by National_Anthem at Sep 22, 2007,
#27
Quote by steven seagull
To be honest that looks like motiviation enough for me - as long as you want to play the thing you'll get somewhere. Just be prepared to REALLY suck for a time before the thing begins to make sense. The first 6 months are the most frustrating and are ultimately what make or break you, if you're determined enough to soldier on through those you'll start to see results.

I CAN'T QUIT MAN, I HAVE NO WHERE ELSE TO GO. *sob*

No, seriously... not enough people believe in me so I can't be lax about what art I chose (I draw and do film, but nothing beats live expression). Either I am memorable, or I die (which is the only other option, because I ain't stopping).


Ok, the first six months are the hardest... where should I go first on my self-taught journey to either greatness or the grave (if I do make it, I would make a pretty good memoir film)?

the usual hot mail stuff.... just thought you'd figure it out... sorry...

I was thinking that, but I wanted to make sure someone I will never know to think of me as a jackass (imagine the feeling of getting just a random 'lets do this ****' e-mail).

Exercises, make up your own. Say, if you want to work on alternate picking just set yourself a problem (as in a maths problem) then try to "solve" it. To make something easy, you have to make it much more difficult first, so when your exercise becomes easy, complicate it.I believe there's a Joe Satriani book with quite a few of his teaching methods and exercises, look into that, he seems like a good teacher. EDIT:And in terms of practise, who can say? I practise violin 4 hours a day, guitar only 1 hour, and I'm 16.

I see... you seem to be making a lot of sense.
Last edited by G O go G O at Sep 22, 2007,
#28
Quote by National_Anthem
Exercises, make up your own. Say, if you want to work on alternate picking just set yourself a problem (as in a maths problem) then try to "solve" it. To make something easy, you have to make it much more difficult first, so when your exercise becomes easy, complicate it.I believe there's a Joe Satriani book with quite a few of his teaching methods and exercises, look into that, he seems like a good teacher. EDIT:And in terms of practise, who can say? I practise violin 4 hours a day, guitar only 1 hour, and I'm 16.



Mmm, I remember he taught some guitarist, never really hear about him though...
Funny words.
#29
Quote by I_Am_Iron_Man
Mmm, I remember he taught some guitarist, never really hear about him though...


You can't tell the quality of a teacher by the quality of their students. If you have really talented students, they will play well with minimal guidance. And teachers shouldn't really teach you to play guitar, but teach you to teach yourself how to play guitar.
#30
Quote by I_Am_Iron_Man
Mmm, I remember he taught some guitarist, never really hear about him though...

You mean Steve Vai?
#31
I guess you've got two options - you can start with the basics learning the open chords to help you get a feel for the thing, build some finger strength and loosen up the hands and take it from there. We all have an idea of how we'd like to play, but ultimately what you have to learn to get there is all pretty much the same...it's not until after a couple of years that you'd have to maybe make a conscious decision as to pursuing a certain style.

Your other option is to just approach the guitar as a new thing and see what you can do with it. However that only really works if you've never had experience with the guitar before, and whilst you've never played you've heard stuff and it's hard not to be influenced in some way. With that in mind, chances are you'd beat yourself up trying to produce sounds by trial and error that ultimately somebody's already figured out for you. It's a nice notion, but ultimately it only really works at a conceptual level.
Actually called Mark!

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#32
Quote by steven seagull
I guess you've got two options - you can start with the basics learning the open chords to help you get a feel for the thing, build some finger strength and loosen up the hands and take it from there. We all have an idea of how we'd like to play, but ultimately what you have to learn to get there is all pretty much the same...it's not until after a couple of years that you'd have to maybe make a conscious decision as to pursuing a certain style.

Your other option is to just approach the guitar as a new thing and see what you can do with it. However that only really works if you've never had experience with the guitar before, and whilst you've never played you've heard stuff and it's hard not to be influenced in some way. With that in mind, chances are you'd beat yourself up trying to produce sounds by trial and error that ultimately somebody's already figured out for you. It's a nice notion, but ultimately it only really works at a conceptual level.


Jesus, why do you have to agree with me but put the point across about 39876249876439876398749 times better?
#33
ive only been playing.. 3.. 4 years.. maybe 5.. but anyways.. im prolly one of the best guitarists in my group of friends.. of course thats not saying much seeing as im one of the only ones that takes lessons
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#34
Quote by steven seagull
I guess you've got two options - you can start with the basics learning the open chords to help you get a feel for the thing, build some finger strength and loosen up the hands and take it from there. We all have an idea of how we'd like to play, but ultimately what you have to learn to get there is all pretty much the same...it's not until after a couple of years that you'd have to maybe make a conscious decision as to pursuing a certain style.

My sound style is completely unique, I will base my gear around it... not my sound around my gear.

It is not like the guitar magically transplants songs into my brain when it thinks I'm ready, I have to think of it then try to match the thought as best as I can (so is the way of art).

However, want to show me where the starting line is to this race?

ive only been playing.. 3.. 4 years.. maybe 5.. but anyways.. im prolly one of the best guitarists in my group of friends.. of course thats not saying much seeing as im one of the only ones that takes lessons

I'll be damned if I ever have to base my time around someone else's schedule.
#35
Quote by National_Anthem
Jesus, why do you have to agree with me but put the point across about 39876249876439876398749 times better?

Like a sidekick that comes in and saves the day when the hero isn't lookng? Kind of like the cat in Hong Kong Phooey then?
Actually called Mark!

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#36
Quote by G O go G O
My sound style is completely unique, I will base my gear around it... not my sound around my gear.

It is not like the guitar magically transplants songs into my brain when it thinks I'm ready, I have to think of it then try to match the thought as best as I can (so is the way of art).

However, want to show me where the starting line is to this race?


You have a style but haven't even started playing yet? Impressive.
#37
Quote by National_Anthem
You have a style but haven't even started playing yet? Impressive.

Again: music starts in the mind, not the instrument.
#38
Quote by G O go G O
Again: music starts in the mind, not the instrument.


But with no technical command of the instrument, you're basically doomed to fail. And seeing as it seems like you have no experience with music, your style is just an image that you want your band to have.
#39
I recckon just start the normal way, open and barre chords, simple songs, the basics of the major scale and chord construction, simple lead stuff. It'll be a bit dull at first I'll admit, but you'll need to adhere to convention initially if only to develop the techniques that you're going to need to express yourself fully. Once you've got the mechanics of playing internalised there's no limits or boundaries as to what you do with them.
Actually called Mark!

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#40
Quote by National_Anthem
But with no technical command of the instrument, you're basically doomed to fail. And seeing as it seems like you have no experience with music, your style is just an image that you want your band to have.

I liked it better when you were helping.

I recckon just start the normal way, open and barre chords, simple songs, the basics of the major scale and chord construction, simple lead stuff. It'll be a bit dull at first I'll admit, but you'll need to adhere to convention initially if only to develop the techniques that you're going to need to express yourself fully. Once you've got the mechanics of playing internalised there's no limits or boundaries as to what you do with them.

Yeah, I know... it is not like I am bound by some guitar hero.

Music is expression, and since I know myself... I know what I am going to play.

But seriously, know any general sites that deal with presenting this information?
Last edited by G O go G O at Sep 22, 2007,
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