#1
Sorry if there is already a thread on this but i couldnt find one!!

So what is fret scalloping and what is it used for random but i want to know

Cheers C
#2
simply put, you remove the wood between frets. It changes the sound a bit, and makes for some very interesting bend possibilities
#4
How can this be done? With sandpaper or what?
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#5
Quote by Firenze
How can this be done? With sandpaper or what?

a round file followed by sandpaper.

back to what its like to play, in my experience it makes bending and vibrato a lot easier, or a suppose to be more specific gives you better control of the string and makes just about everything else a little bit harder, most noticeably legato playing
#6
im gonna scallop my build fretboard before i change it to see what its like, and if i like it ill scalliop the new one
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#7
Quote by admbwr
im gonna scallop my build fretboard before i change it to see what its like, and if i like it ill scalliop the new one


Just keep in mind that scalloping is not as easy a mod as most would have you believe - unless you have a lot of experience. You can easily end up with something you are not happy with or just plain ruining the fretboard. Good idea starting with an inexpensive/junk neck.

There are different ways to scallope and one may work much better for you than the other. Be careful and patient. I do scalloping and, personally, I would recommend the half-barre scallope - much more usable.

Good luck
#9
^ +1 to that thought.

It requires a lighter touch, or you will bend the notes sharp from too much downward pressure.

A scalloped neck allows for incredible ease in bending, but comes with a great price.
Careless / heavy-handed fretting will stick out like a sore thumb.

Most people who use scalloped necks don't use extra light gauge strings either.
10s are a bit light. 10.5s or 11s are about as light as you will probably want to go.
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#10
i did mine becuase im getting a new neck and its actualy not too shabby, you can get much more out of each note. its a hack jobthough, if i decide to do my new neck ill give itmore than a 5 minute effort lol
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#11
i tihnk it looks weird as f*ck, but i've always been secretly intrigued....
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#12
I've always wondered where you could get (and what size) a file that could fit in the 20-24 frets

I wanna try this with my old Yamaha
#13
I used a 1/4 inch file from Harbor Freight Tools and a 1/8 inch dowel with various grits of sand paper wrapped around them for finishing.

I use 10s and to be honest, I don't really have a problem with notes going sharp. Then again I have a fairly light touch to begin with...
#16
Quote by forsaknazrael
^Yeah, I have a pretty heavy touch. I used to use a wound .018 G string, and the bottom of it would be flattened where frets would be. I had a big problem with sharp notes when I tried a Scalloped fretboard.


Wow, another wound G user!
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#18
Quote by dnr0721
Just keep in mind that scalloping is not as easy a mod as most would have you believe - unless you have a lot of experience. You can easily end up with something you are not happy with or just plain ruining the fretboard. Good idea starting with an inexpensive/junk neck.

There are different ways to scallope and one may work much better for you than the other. Be careful and patient. I do scalloping and, personally, I would recommend the half-barre scallope - much more usable.

Good luck


Naw, I disagree. With some basic knowledge of woodworking, a bit of dexterity, and a little bit of attention to detail anyone could scallop a neck.

There is nothing that feels quite like a scalloped neck, I love mine. I think the reason many people don't like their scallops is that they are too deep, the neck feels extremely uncomfortable. Everyone that's played my guitar, including people that were just starting, loved the feel of scalloped frets (and my Ernie Ball Extra Slinkys, they are a great combo).
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