#1
Okay so basically I came up with little bass line, it'll sound familiar to all of you I think although i'm not sure where from, I ust recognised it. I built it from the h/w scale its just an ascending descending pattern.

E-------------------
B------------------
G-------------------
D--------------------
A---------1-2-1-----
E-0h1-3-4-------4-3


Except I cant seem to find anything nice that will improvise over it, the h/w scale just sounds to unresolved to me for it...
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#2
lol thats the point of the h/w scale, to sound un-resolved.

I dont think the scale was constructed to make a whole song out of it. I think, as in I'm not entirely sure, composers used to use a h/w run to add tension and darkness to a segment of there songs. They wouldn't normally attempt to write a whole song bassed entirely of the 8 notes of the h/w scale.

Maybe use the second mode of the hungarian major scale? and transpose it diatonically down 1 degree and play the hungarian major scale to resolve it?
If you don't use the #2 of the hungarian major scale, you could play the scale like the lydian dominant mode to resolve it.

So I would play this:

E--------------------------|-----------------------------
B--------------------------|----------------------------
G--------------------------|----------------------------
D--------------------------|-----------------------------
A---------1-2-1------------|---------10-11-13-11-10---------
E-0h1-3-4-------4-3--------|-9h12-13---------------13------
I would improvise with the Ultralocrian Flat Sixth (or the second mode of the hungarian major mode) for the first bar and then the lydian dominant mode, without its second, for the next bar to resolve.


But then again, it's what you would do thats more important. It is your riff.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Sep 24, 2007,
#3
What is h/w? Half Whole?

Also, what is the difference between the Locrian and Ultralocrian scales?
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#4
Quote by Instrumetal
What is h/w? Half Whole?

Also, what is the difference between the Locrian and Ultralocrian scales?
h/w = half whole.

Locrian
1,b2,b3,4,b5,b6,b7
ultralocrian
1,b2,b3,bb4,b5,b6,bb7
superlocrian
1,b2,b3,bb4,b5,b6,b7
Ultralocrian Flat Sixth
1,b2,b3,bb4,b5,bb6,b7


Ultralocrian means that the seventh and fourth degree of the locrian mode is lowered yet another semitone. BTW, superlocrian mean that only the fourth mode is lowered yet another semitone from the locrian mode.

And the ultralocrian mode is a MODE, not a scale.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#5
Quote by demonofthenight
h/w = half whole.
And the ultralocrian mode is a MODE, not a scale.


Ooh, sorry. Why do I keep mixing those up...

Diminished = bb_ right? So does that simply mean that a diminished note is when you flat an already flatted degree?
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#6
If you're dealing with perfect intervals (fourths, fifths, octaves) flatting them once makes a diminished interval.

Example: C# to G# is a perfect fifth, C# to G natural is a diminished fifth.

If you're dealing with major/minor intervals, such as seconds, thirds, sixths and sevenths, they must be flatted twice relative to the major interval, or once relative to the minor interval.

Example: C to B is a major 7th, so flat twice from the major interval, and then you get C to Bbb as a diminished 7th.

C# to E is a minor third. You only flat a minor interval once to get a diminished from a minor interval, so C# to Eb would be a diminished third.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#7
Quote by psychodelia
C to B is a major 7th, so flat twice from the major interval, and then you get C to Bbb as a diminished 7th.


Bbb = A?
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#8
Quote by Instrumetal
Bbb = A?



In how it sounds, yes, in what it means, no.
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