#1
Not over all - I mean for one or two tunes. See in my band everyone has always had a suffient part. But I've just written two tunes where I simply don't want any bass or extra percussion. I get the feeling they might be a bit upset, or worst yet play along anyway.

It's not that I don't want them in it, they just don't suit for these two tracks.

What do I do, do I say it likes it's no big deal or do I brake it very gently?
#2
i think you should tell them and do another write another song were they have like a main part
#3
then it seems you should get your head out your ass and let them play with you rather then you stealing all the limelight
#4
Quote by -SpasticInk-
then it seems you should get your head out your ass and let them play with you rather then you stealing all the limelight


+1

this is why the band should write the music not just one player
#6
What!? Not every song requires every instrument to be included. You shouldn't feel like you need to be musically restricted, so just tell them like it's not a big thing. As long as it doesn't become a regular event, maybe your bandmates might even enjoy the variety, or the chance to take a break in the middle of a gig
#7
Quote by frigginjerk
tell them you wrote a few tunes that you could play in between sets to stretch out the show while they have a nice long break to drink an extra beer.

+1

Actually, I wrote a song for my band that the bass doesn't come in until halfway through, and he took it fine. It shouldn't be that big of a deal to cut an instrument out for one or two songs.
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#8
Quote by -SpasticInk-
then it seems you should get your head out your ass and let them play with you rather then you stealing all the limelight


Considering the "limelight" is on the brass in these tunes, no.

Thanks everyone, I think I'll just make like its no big thing. They should take it alright.
#10
see if it fits with bass and percussion, and if it doesnt go well suggest they dont play and have a break.
#11
Quote by -SpasticInk-
then it seems you should get your head out your ass and let them play with you rather then you stealing all the limelight


+1 .. Sort if out!
Quote by Count Seanula
If you want to solo then solo, if he wants to solo then he should solo, if your bassist wants to solo...slap him
#12
Why not just record those tunes, and not play them live. But put them as interludes on the cd(if you guys make one). Or incorporate all of the instruments gradually, and use it as an entrance where the first instrument comes out and starts, and then the second, and bridge that to your first song. I generally think the audience really enjoys energy, and I see what I suggesting giving them more, than random breaks in sets.
#13
Quote by -SpasticInk-
then it seems you should get your head out your ass and let them play with you rather then you stealing all the limelight

No. Serve the song. If bass and extra percussion clutters and ruins a song then take it out. Just serve the song.
#14
Quote by WhereArtEsteban
No. Serve the song. If bass and extra percussion clutters and ruins a song then take it out. Just serve the song.


Thank you for saying that. I thought I'd have to.

And TS, I'm pretty sure your bassist and drummer can stand to just chill for a couple minutes.
#15
Quote by JWD192005
+1

this is why the band should write the music not just one player


It's called a solo spot. All the great guitar players have them, and even drummers and bassists can have them. Just let those guys have a solo spot and you're good.
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#16
Explain to them WHY you don't need for this song, in a polite way of course. Once they understand why they aren't needed, their musician's mind will take over and they'll probably agree the song would sound better without them.
#17
Quote by woodenbandman
It's called a solo spot. All the great guitar players have them, and even drummers and bassists can have them. Just let those guys have a solo spot and you're good.

Exactly. Just look at Anesthesia off of Kill 'Em All.
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#18
Assuming your cool with your band mates like this, just tell them the songs mean something to you and you think they'd sound better with "just you", as opposed to "without them." And just that the feeling and the songs are communicated better when played that way.'

Edit: What about giving them another role? Maybe teach the bassist some chords to strum on guitar? Backup vocals? It'd also give the band a chance to explore their talents.
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#19
extra percussion? as in what?

sounds to me like you need to learn something about band dynamics, and start writing less ****ty music.