#1
So until now I've been predominately a cover artist. I've done a fair bit of improving and stuff, but have never written a song. I know that this will open up a realm of possibilities once I do, so I want to start.

I've tried...really I have, but honestly, I think I'm trying too hard.

I just get so confused. I know a fair bit o theory to put behind it, but just sitting down and writing doesn't come easy to me. I find a good chord progression and it sound like something already written, or, I find a good riff, but don't know where to go from there...

Help please??

Another big thing is I get overwhlemed, I don't know whether to use open chords, power chords, bar chords, octave chords...
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#2
well what to use depends on the type of song, and what comes after them.
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#3
Well, it is much easier to write a song with other people, ie, having drums and bass behind you, but if you are on your own, it's important that you record what you do somehow. Whether you write down tabs of your riffs, or you record them, you have to keep track. Other than that, take it easy, don't get overwhelmed and try to think of what you want to say with your song. The rest is up to you and your creativity.
Get baked, study theory.

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#4
Quote by FoolOnThePlanet
So until now I've been predominately a cover artist. I've done a fair bit of improving and stuff, but have never written a song. I know that this will open up a realm of possibilities once I do, so I want to start.

I've tried...really I have, but honestly, I think I'm trying too hard.

I just get so confused. I know a fair bit o theory to put behind it, but just sitting down and writing doesn't come easy to me. I find a good chord progression and it sound like something already written, or, I find a good riff, but don't know where to go from there...

Help please??
The way I understand music is in a heirachy:
Melody (what that sceneboy in your band sings, or even what the lead guitarist plays)
Rhythym guitar (can be just a simple chord progression, or a riff)
Bass (is meant to accompany and make the rhythym sound good)
Beat (drummer, keeps the beat for your band, as simple as that)

Although one aspect accompany's and supports another, don't EVER try dull one down for another. If you structure it well, it will never sound bad, no matter how much you write.

The melody is the most important thing in the whole song. Its what makes your song YOUR song, without it your left with just a jam track or a boring instrumental. Don't you ever wonder why the singer gets the most chicks? (sorry girls for the chavaunistic remark, I'm just making a point). Its because they are presenting the most important part of the song. Make your melody catchy and complex, so it doesn't get boring. But don't make it too complex, as it won't be catchy (sorry for the paradox).

The rhythym (as in rhythym guitar, not like the drum rhthym) bassically supports the melody. It enhances and makes the melody sound more like you want it to sound, it gives the melody more feeling. The rhythyms job is to be harmonically sound; like you wouldn't normally play a major chord under a diminished melody, its not harmonically right (many musicians would tell you not play a diminished melody at all ). The rhythym is where your extensive knowledge of theory really helps. Generally, keep your rhthym (the chords, the riffs, whatever) in key to the melody.

A bad bassist is around only to sound acoustically good. As in the bad bassist would just play the root note of the riff. But a good bassist would play a nice riff, similar to the guitarist. I'm not a bass guitarist, so I honestly dont have any tips to writing bass lines.

Sorry drummers, but your only around to keep the beat. You are the structure to the band and the song, without you the act will fall to peices. Personally, I view the drummer as a glorified, nicer sounding metronome. Once again, I don't play drums so I have no tips.

When you have all of the above, its time to start using some musical devices. Like using syncopation is your bass lines, or using modes in your melody, or using a chord progression (which is norally just copied from a chord progression you like), or using some sort of form in your songs (IE, intro (no melody, my guess for the intro is to introduce the chord-progression, verse, chorus (make a really catchy melody), bridge, solo (complex guitar melody) and so on). Study songs you like and study what musical devices it uses, study why its a good song.

Now my fingertips hurt. I'm not going to write about lyrics (as these days they're just as important as melodies) because that would involve another long, boring essay. Just remember this is what I *stresses on I* would do. This is what's going on in MY head when I'm writing. And also I'm subject to edit this in a couple of hours
Quote by FoolOnThePlanet

Another big thing is I get overwhlemed, I don't know whether to use open chords, power chords, bar chords, octave chords...
Sorry, but thats a decision you have to make
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