#1
My bass teacher is sort of pissing me off lately because when he tell me what to play, he tells me to play like B or E but this only being my third lesson, I still have no clue where they are all located off the top of my head.

Is there a trick? I know what they all are, but it takes me a while to figure it out.
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#2
I started with memorizing the 5th and 10th frets (open string notes), and then fill in the gaps with the C major scale. If you can get the C scale down, finding the sharps and flats shouldn't be a huge problem. I still have trouble naming notes higher of the fretboard.
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#3
I dont know of any particular tricks, u just have to keep practicing. You'll find the more you practice, the better at it you'll become.

a trick for practicing though, this is one i used. My bass teacher had me make flash cards with the different notes (A, G, Bflat, etc.) I'd shuffle them, and then pick one, and as quickly as I could, find that note. With stuff like that, I learned the fretboard in no time.
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#5
it helps to look at the pattern of fifths and octaves. for example:


G----------------------------------
D---------------------7-(octave)
A---7-(fifth)----------------------
E-5----------------5--------------

I use this a lot to find notes around the board.

But also remember that it is all chromatic!
#6
i just forced myself to learn by printing out chord sheets for church songs and playing the root note over the song playing...i learned the E and A strings pretty fast, and u just use my knowledge of the fret board to figure the others out quicker...like if you go up a string and up 7 frets you've got the same note on an octave.
#7
Quote by LetTheBassPlay
I dont know of any particular tricks, u just have to keep practicing. You'll find the more you practice, the better at it you'll become.

a trick for practicing though, this is one i used. My bass teacher had me make flash cards with the different notes (A, G, Bflat, etc.) I'd shuffle them, and then pick one, and as quickly as I could, find that note. With stuff like that, I learned the fretboard in no time.

+1 to this lad here
thats what i did, but i dont have a teacher, i learned it from someone posting it...in the bass forums!
lol but this guys right, its helps alot
and the c scale does help too
#8
First off, Learn all the notes on the E string. No way around that.
From there, you can go up strings and figure out notes based on their relativity to the note on the E.

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#9
Quote by altophoenix
it helps to look at the pattern of fifths and octaves. for example:


G----------------------------------
D---------------------7-(octave)
A---7-(fifth)----------------------
E-5----------------5--------------

I use this a lot to find notes around the board.

But also remember that it is all chromatic!


This is a good method.
#10
Check it: the fattest string at the top is the E string. Playing this string open (not fretting it) will produce an E note. Further more, if you fret the 12th fret on the E string, this is also an E, but it is an E note that is one octave higher.

There are 12 notes in the chromatic scale...notice how there are also 12 frets between open string E note and 12th fret E note. What letter comes after E in the alphabet? Thats right, F. and F is the first fret (closest to the neck of the guitar).

So it goes like this...

open = E
1st fret = F
3rd fret = G
5th fret = A
7th fret = B
8th fret = C
10th fret = D
12th fret = E

So the rule is, you skip a fret between each note in the chromatic scale, except between B/C and E/F. This is true on all strings.

Now, try figuring out, based on what I have told you, the notes on the next string down. Hint hint, this is the A string (the note played when the string is open is A, in other words).
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#11
Arpeggio excercises really help
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#12
err, anyway, my method is a really really basic intro as opposed to the more advanced methods listed above.

I memorized the notes by hand thus far haha insane.
Regards,
PowrSlave
#13
Just learn all the notes on E and A string and learn octaves. The A note is fret 5 on E so it is fret 7 on D.

Then you already know the notes on the high e string because it's the same as the low one.
I know I'm kind of confusing.
That's just how I look at it.


Just practice, and take your time to think about what notes you're playing.


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#14
I never really found a way to memorize them, except for playing for years and therefor just know where they are now.


Heres my advice:

You can figure out where any note is very quickly, and yet you don't even know it.

You know the names of your strings right? Well if not I suggest you learn them now, or you won't get very far (in memorizing the notes that is)

E (The thickest string)
A
D
G (The smallest string)

are the four strings of a bass. Thats four notes you already know where they are! Now you might have covered this already but im not sure. The musicial is as follows.

#=Sharp


A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G#


after G# it repeats back to A.


So if your teacher says, play a E note. All you would have to do is hit the E string or the thickest string and boom theres the E note.

Now say he wants a B instead, don't panic, it's just as easy as the E note. As you prolly noticed, there is no B string on a 4 stringed bass so your going to have to resort to a freted note. Refering back to the musicial scale I provided makes this easy. To make it simple lets pick the closest letter to B, which out of the 4 strings is A. So because the A string is the A note, the 1st fret on the A string would be A#, because A# is the next note in the musical scale. and after A# is B, on the 2nd fret of the A string.

Begginners(sp?) often panic because they don't know or haven't memorized where all the notes are. You don't have to drill yourself on memorzing them. Just be able to find them like I have just demonstrated, and memorization will come with time.

Hope this has helped, if you have any questions, feel free to PM me. Good luck dude, and rock on.
#15
I always call the 12th fret "high zero" and the 13th fret "high first." The frets repeat themselves after the 12th fret, so that's already half the fretboard you don't have to remember.
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#16
Quote by Guitarfreak777
I never really found a way to memorize them, except for playing for years and therefor just know where they are now.


Heres my advice:

You can figure out where any note is very quickly, and yet you don't even know it.

You know the names of your strings right? Well if not I suggest you learn them now, or you won't get very far (in memorizing the notes that is)

E (The thickest string)
A
D
G (The smallest string)

are the four strings of a bass. Thats four notes you already know where they are! Now you might have covered this already but im not sure. The musicial is as follows.

#=Sharp


A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G#


after G# it repeats back to A.


So if your teacher says, play a E note. All you would have to do is hit the E string or the thickest string and boom theres the E note.

Now say he wants a B instead, don't panic, it's just as easy as the E note. As you prolly noticed, there is no B string on a 4 stringed bass so your going to have to resort to a freted note. Refering back to the musicial scale I provided makes this easy. To make it simple lets pick the closest letter to B, which out of the 4 strings is A. So because the A string is the A note, the 1st fret on the A string would be A#, because A# is the next note in the musical scale. and after A# is B, on the 2nd fret of the A string.

Begginners(sp?) often panic because they don't know or haven't memorized where all the notes are. You don't have to drill yourself on memorzing them. Just be able to find them like I have just demonstrated, and memorization will come with time.

Hope this has helped, if you have any questions, feel free to PM me. Good luck dude, and rock on.

thats exactly what i did and it worked great. good luck
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#17
Whether it's easy or not, how I learned is thus: Learned the open strings. Learned the dots (3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th fret etc). Once you have those down, you can count up or down to any note pretty quickly as long as you know your alphabet. After a while, it becomes second nature.

Oh, and pick up music theory books et cetera at the same time. If you mix theory with physical practice and muscle memory, you'll understand "why", and the "how" part clicks into your brain much faster. Even better are books with CDs that help train your ear- ear training won't give you a fast track way to find a C#, but it'll help you start putting pitches to frets, even if only in relation to other frets. VERY important for improvising and writing, and it'll help you ditch the reliance on tabs for learning music.
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Last edited by Caustic at Sep 24, 2007,
#19
I just memorized the space between each step, or the notes, and filled it in with the notes on open strings.

IE, I know the first string is E (typically), so up one fret is up half a step which gives me F, and another half step, the 2dnd fret, gives me F# because that note is half a step up from F, and F is half a step up fron E. Since the pattern for all the notes in regards to half and full steps is constant, just memorizing that and applying it to the open strings is a fairly easy way to figure out the notes.
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#21
This thread has been a great help =D

I'm just starting out too and couldn't figure out how the heck to know where each note is.

Thanks for all the great tips everyone ^_^