#1
Hey, I want to make sure i have this straight...
If i am improvising on a song in the key of C, and the chord changes are C7, F7, G7, F7, C7...
just the basics. if i start playing with the changes in the key scale, a C blues or jazz scale, as long as i play the root note of the chord along with the change, i can improv along the rest of it correct?

mike
#2
I mean you could do it that way, or you can just improvise using the C major scale and its respective modes that aren't minor because your using a I-IV-V. Just don't play your avoid notes and you should be fine.
#3
you can learn your arpeggios all over the neck, along with your triads all over the neck. those come in handy.

also i think the most important thing if you want to do jazz soloing, is to listen to jazz. and start transcribing.

thats the best way to learn, is to start transcribing jazz songs from various jazz artists. look at what they do, and look at the chords being played under what they do. then you start to see relationships.

a professor at berklee college of music, named tomo fujita said this. "how can you expect to solo in a jazz style, if you don't listen to jazz music?, it's like someone saying "i want to make a lot of money, but i know nothing about buisness" it just doesn't make sense"

understand?

if you must, a good starting point is scott henderson's "jazz fusion soloing" video
http://richmusic.dmusic.com

"Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible."
#4
Quote by disherm
Hey, I want to make sure i have this straight...
If i am improvising on a song in the key of C, and the chord changes are C7, F7, G7, F7, C7...
just the basics. if i start playing with the changes in the key scale, a C blues or jazz scale, as long as i play the root note of the chord along with the change, i can improv along the rest of it correct?

mike
There is no Jazz scale. Although the melodic minor is called the jazz minor in guitar-pro, it is not a specific jazz scale.

And that progression you wrote out is NOT in the key of C. Sorry to destroy your hopes, but it isn't. In the key of C, the C major chord and the F major chord cannot be dominant. That is if you want to stay diatonic. If you wanted to have your song in the key of C, I would suggest changing that C7 and that F7 to Cmaj7 and Fmaj7, respectivily.

And yes, playing the a scale and changing the root everytime the chord changes would sometimes work, maybe not with a complete heptatonic scale but I know it works with the pentatonic scales. Although, I would suggest using the pentatonic major instead of using the blues scale. The blues scale is simply a minor pentatonic with a tritone thrown in. It is a type of minor scale and therefore does not work to well over a major chord. The minor third of the scale clashes with the major third of the chord.

And to rich2k4, playing just arpeggios will start sounding boring in about 15 seconds. Trust me on that one.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#5
i was not saying to play arpeggios all the time. i just said to learn all of them all over the neck. by doing that, you can use hem to build phrases.
http://richmusic.dmusic.com

"Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible."
#6
Quote by rich2k4
you can learn your arpeggios all over the neck, along with your triads all over the neck. those come in handy.

also i think the most important thing if you want to do jazz soloing, is to listen to jazz. and start transcribing.

thats the best way to learn, is to start transcribing jazz songs from various jazz artists. look at what they do, and look at the chords being played under what they do. then you start to see relationships.

a professor at berklee college of music, named tomo fujita said this. "how can you expect to solo in a jazz style, if you don't listen to jazz music?, it's like someone saying "i want to make a lot of money, but i know nothing about buisness" it just doesn't make sense"

understand?

if you must, a good starting point is scott henderson's "jazz fusion soloing" video


yes, i understand. i am currently a student, and play in the schools jazz band of 13, and i am the only guitarist. i am currently getting cd's at the moment to beef up my ear to the style of jazz even more.

thanks for the video

mike
#7
Quote by disherm
Hey, I want to make sure i have this straight...
If i am improvising on a song in the key of C, and the chord changes are C7, F7, G7, F7, C7...
just the basics. if i start playing with the changes in the key scale, a C blues or jazz scale, as long as i play the root note of the chord along with the change, i can improv along the rest of it correct?

mike


Well what you have there is pretty much a standard blues progression. There's
a whole lot of ways you could intepret it. It's almost a certainty that progression
would have a key signature of C major even though those chords aren't entirely
in key.

C Blues or Minor Pentatonic would be the standard approach for straight up blues.
With some additional attention to chord outlining that's about the easiest approach.