#1
i see people all the time doing pentatonic riffs, but i cant make the pentatonic scale sound any good, really any scale for that matter. how do you take it from playing the scale to playing a riff, it seems impossible to me. Ive played them a bunch, played them in 3rds, played random notes, pushed time, ive done everything that is supposed to help but i still cant get a decent sounding thing to come out.

any ideas?
#2
if you listen to any sabbath sabbath, zeppelin, or even guns n roses, you'll get some pretty good ideas on how to use pentatonics in a kick ass way. Listening and incorporating things I hear that I like into my playing is how I go about making riffs.
#3
maybe you are just creatively challenged...

but really it shouldn't be that much of a problem...just mess with rhythm, repeat notes, throw in some dissonance and some slides hammers and pulls and such...
#4
maybe ill just lay down a rhythm track and just suffer through all my twinkle little star improvisation until it sounds good
#5
Dude, I'll tell you what really helped me. A few riffs from the end Freebird solo I learnt, I just twisted them and changed them until they were something new. Keep learning riffs in the pentatonics and eventually it'll be easy to improvise your own.
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#6
Learn the Blues scale which is the pentatonic scale with a sharp 4 and sharp 11 (same note an octave apart) added Learn the major scale, minor pentatonic, major pentatonic, learn modes!

Blend these scales and modes together with arpeggios and follow the chords, each time the chord changes you can change what you play to follow the changes.
Start by mixing minor pentatonic with dorian mode, for instance if you listen to Hotel California Joe Walsh is playing in Amin, a blend of A minor pentatonic and A dorian, A dorian is a Gmaj scale from A to A.

Hope this isn't to complex and offers some help.
There is a great CD instructional lesson called Improvisational Tool kit available from TrueFire

www.truefire.com

It has almost everything to do with guitar theory in charts over like 4 or 5 pages and is simple to understand!
#7
The most important thing is to make sure your tring to create something over the correct chords - most things sound like ass without them. For example, if you want to create a lick in Am pentatonic then have an A major, A minor or A7 chord to play over. Even the same lick will have a different feel over each of those chords.
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#8
Quote by telecasterred
Learn the Blues scale which is the pentatonic scale with a sharp 4 and sharp 11 (same note an octave apart) added Learn the major scale, minor pentatonic, major pentatonic, learn modes!

Blend these scales and modes together with arpeggios and follow the chords, each time the chord changes you can change what you play to follow the changes.
Start by mixing minor pentatonic with dorian mode, for instance if you listen to Hotel California Joe Walsh is playing in Amin, a blend of A minor pentatonic and A dorian, A dorian is a Gmaj scale from A to A.

Hope this isn't to complex and offers some help.
There is a great CD instructional lesson called Improvisational Tool kit available from TrueFire

www.truefire.com

It has almost everything to do with guitar theory in charts over like 4 or 5 pages and is simple to understand!


i do know all this stuff(miodes, all pentatonics and such) i just cant get it to sound respectable, everything i try to improvise sounds like twinkle twinkle little star
#9
for some repeating pattern ideas I really like Zakk Wylde's pentatonic playing. Also for sheer creativeness and all around brilliance the new chili peppers album is full of awesome pentatonic applications.

I agree its important to practice over the chord changes too. I think its important to really get teh scale under your fingers even if its really boring practicing it until its automatic will pay off over time. Also I find bends, slides and vibrato can make even a simple pentatonic riff sound much cooler.
#10
Quote by DirtyMcCurty
i see people all the time doing pentatonic riffs, but i cant make the pentatonic scale sound any good, really any scale for that matter. how do you take it from playing the scale to playing a riff, it seems impossible to me. Ive played them a bunch, played them in 3rds, played random notes, pushed time, ive done everything that is supposed to help but i still cant get a decent sounding thing to come out.

any ideas?


Do you mean riffs or licks? There is a difference: Riffs are parts of a song, like the main riff from Iron man or the intro to Master of Puppets whereas a lick is like a canned string of notes that you can play well and is good for ripping out in the middle of an improvised solo.

Which is it that you want?
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#12
Learning songs by blues and blues-based guitarists will go an awful long way then; try some of these guitarists:

David Gilmour (Pink Floyd)
Angus Young (AC/DC)
Stevie Ray Vaughn

That's a range of styles to get you started.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.