#1
Hello.

I'm writing a song and at one section, the rythym follows what's in the title, F#, F, D#, B then repeating. Those are the root notes of my rythym, there's changed notes in there as the rythym progresses but the root note stays the same. I was just wondering what scale(s) would be good to choose to solo over it. I find writing solos difficult enough without trying to do it in the wrong scale.

Thanks for any help.
Last edited by DM48 at Sep 26, 2007,
#2
I don't know too much about scales but I think F# major would sound good
#4
go read about scales and modes its really helpful to create your own
Quote by DieGarbageMan
i can become erect whilst displeasing women




What a talented person.
#6
Quote by JWD192005
whats the key Signature?

I have absolutely no idea how to tell that I'm afraid.

Thanks for the suggestions.
#7
F# D# B are all notes in the B major chord.

Use the key of B major (or use B lydian or B mixolydian)
The "Popped Collar" Award(Sexiest)
Elvenkindje

The "Rest In Real Life" Award(Best Past MT Mod)
Elvenkindje
#9
-1 to elvenkindje. He said those are the root notes of the chords (that F should be E#, by the way.) and all of those notes fall into F# major.
#10
Ok, F# major it is.
Quote by rockstar mace
go read about scales and modes its really helpful to create your own


Well I would do if I had the time, which I don't have much of unfortunately. My music theory is a bit limited. For example I don't understand why the 5th of a note is always 7 half steps apart, yet a third doesn't seem to be always the same number of half steps apart (which is causing me problems when trying to harmonise), or like why F should be called E# sometimes, that's why I came and asked for a more informed opinion. =)

Thanks for the help.
#11
Well, the perfect fifth of the note is always 7 half steps apart. A third doesn't change so long as you specify what kind of third. Major thirds are 4 half steps away, while minor thirds are 3 half steps away.

F is called E# sometimes depending on the scale given and the context.

That's basically a short answer. One could get more detailed on this.
#12
F# Major, so long as you're calling that F an E#.
Quote by Mazzakazza
Play Meshuggah. It is the solution.
#13
Yes, see, diatonically speaking, no one note can repeat itself. That is, to say, for example, F F# are not diatonic. You can either call the F E# or, the F# Gb.
You simply MUST check out my music on
Reverbnation Downloads available here
Myspace Streaming Only


Especially for fans of Tool, APC, Avant-Garde, Ambient music, rock instrumentals, and fans of music in general. Will not disappoint.
#14
Quote by DM48
I'm writing a song and at one section, the rythym follows what's in the title, F#, F, D#, B

I'd also like to clarify that this isn't a rhythm, it's a chord progression (of sorts). I know its pedantic of me so i do apologise for that.