#1
I know anchoring threads have been made 100 times but I have a specific question. I found the following video...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-foj1UOhRo&mode=related&search= And noticed the guitar player was anchoring with 2 fingers. Now i am wondering if it is ok in playing this style of music or not? I mean everything seems smooth and flowing so I was wondering if for what is being played its ok in this situation>?
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#2
I do not understand why people keep talking about anchoring is ok or not. If if makes you pull off the licks by anchoring -fine anchor with as many fingers as you like. In the end i'ts better to play clean and smooth as to play sloppy and think you look like the coolest guitar dude in the world. If you play goog people will begin looking at your technique if you play sloppy, they will go away.
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#3
Anchoring = bad.

Notice: the absence of conditions; it is always bad technique no matter what you're doing.
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#4
Anchoring is bad as it puts more pressure on your body, unanchoring doesn't have this tension and less tension = faster movements, easier.

100% efficient technique is what people should be aiming for to minimize effort and strain. Otherwise you have to put in more effort ( practice ) than you should have to. So it's up to you what you do.

Anchoring COULD also lead to injury, just as any incorrect technique on anything could.
#5
Yes anchoring could lead to injury, but pls. name the top class players who has glued their hands to the guitar and only plays phrases all night long. I have not seen any player that did not under certain phrases support their hand, either by anchoring or resting their palm on the bridge for increased accuracy. My point is if it helps your play do it - but dont rely entirely on it.
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#6
Quote by qriz
Yes anchoring could lead to injury, but pls. name the top class players who has glued their hands to the guitar and only plays phrases all night long. I have not seen any player that did not under certain phrases support their hand, either by anchoring or resting their palm on the bridge for increased accuracy. My point is if it helps your play do it - but dont rely entirely on it.


Shawn Lane, Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai and Rusty Cooley. Please also note that palm muting is not anchoring.

Edit: Also note: Steve Morse anchors and has CTS because of it. Anchoring = bad.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Sep 28, 2007,
#7
Quote by radiantmoon
I know anchoring threads have been made 100 times but I have a specific question. I found the following video...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-foj1UOhRo&mode=related&search= And noticed the guitar player was anchoring with 2 fingers. Now i am wondering if it is ok in playing this style of music or not? I mean everything seems smooth and flowing so I was wondering if for what is being played its ok in this situation>?


Well, listen to that guy play.... he sounds great. His playing sounds relaxed, and is very musical.

That being said, if he was playing unanchored, I think he would be able to play just as well.
But he does anchor, he does sound great, and he probably doesnt have CTS. (BTW I know I guy that does not anchor... is an incredible shredder.... and DOES have CTS)
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well, listen to that guy play.... he sounds great. His playing sounds relaxed, and is very musical.

That being said, if he was playing unanchored, I think he would be able to play just as well.
But he does anchor, he does sound great, and he probably doesnt have CTS. (BTW I know I guy that does not anchor... is an incredible shredder.... and DOES have CTS)


believe it or not its a woman playing that guitar, heres another vidoe if your interested in her technique http://www.guitarplayertv.com/

look under guitar lessons then jazz anatomy
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
Last edited by radiantmoon at Sep 28, 2007,
#9
Quote by radiantmoon
believe it or not its a woman playing that guitar, heres another vidoe if your interested in her technique http://www.guitarplayertv.com/

LOL, for some reason I pictured an old man playing. thanks for the link I'll check it out.
#10
Anchoring is not "bad", technically, there are plenty of people who can play fine while anchored. The catch is that not anchoring is "best". The players who anchor (say John Petrucci and Steve Morse, for example) are not going to get any better, and they are going to (or in Morse's case, already have) hurt themselves. The players who don't anchor (like Paul Gilbert and Shawn lane) are going to be able to constantly improve, and will be able to play guitar pain-free for the rest of their lives.

By the way, there is already a 16-page thread about this in the MT sticky, go read it.
#11
Quote by which ones pink
Anchoring is not "bad", technically, there are plenty of people who can play fine while anchored. The catch is that not anchoring is "best". The players who anchor (say John Petrucci and Steve Morse, for example) are not going to get any better, and they are going to (or in Morse's case, already have) hurt themselves. The players who don't anchor (like Paul Gilbert and Shawn lane) are going to be able to constantly improve, and will be able to play guitar pain-free for the rest of their lives.

By the way, there is already a 16-page thread about this in the MT sticky, go read it.


It's kinda funny that you should mention Shawn Lane as an example of someone who will be able to play guitar pain-free for the rest of their lives.

I'll agree that anchoring seriously limits the mobility of your hand at the very least.
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#13
As usual, it's better if you don't. Perhaps edg can tell us some more about her technique as he has taken lessons with Mimi Fox, the woman in the video.
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#14
Quote by pifty
It's kinda funny that you should mention Shawn Lane as an example of someone who will be able to play guitar pain-free for the rest of their lives.

I'll agree that anchoring seriously limits the mobility of your hand at the very least.


Actually it's interesting top note that towards then end of his life that guitar playing was the one thing that absolutely wasn't affected by the disease. Probably hasn't got a lot to do with his technique but still; interesting.
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#15
Quote by Resiliance
As usual, it's better if you don't. Perhaps edg can tell us some more about her technique as he has taken lessons with Mimi Fox, the woman in the video.


yeah I have read pretty much all the anchoring threads on this site, but when I came across this video it seemed that anchoring wouldnt be bad for technique in this style.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#16
If you arent attempting to shred at blinding speeds or something, then by all means, its ok if you anchor, its not gonna kill you, or your family
#17
well that was my question.......for this style of playing.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#18
Its about arm control. All these great players that anchor have great arm control. These great players we find playing unanchored have great arm control.

Playing unanchored forces you to learn arm control, which will come to you in time regardless of playing anchored or unanchored, but going the unanchored route will most likely develop this control sooner and more efficiently.

So once you have this 'arm control' it doesn't really matter anymore.

And honestly, the information on guitar technique is becoming more available to everyone. So it should be no surprise that lots of accomplished players use techniques that a lot of us might not find efficient.
epic7734
#19
Quote by Resiliance
As usual, it's better if you don't. Perhaps edg can tell us some more about her technique as he has taken lessons with Mimi Fox, the woman in the video.



ha. yeah that was Mimi all right. Yeah, I can assure you she can play without having
to anchor. It's been a while, but I did sit in front of her for 2 years I used to
pick with my little finger kind of curled around the neck where it meets the body and
she never said a thing.

I think a lot of really good players have been so good for so long, they really forget a lot of what it took to get themselves there. They just can't explain the path very
well and don't make good teachers. We went through jazz song after song after
song, and I couldn't even play a simple ii-V-I very well. I guess she thought I'd
get it by osmosis or something.

That's one thing about trying to infer things from watching someone really good.
They have traveled a certain path to get themselves there. You are only seeing
the end result. You can't just assume you can apply thier end result to yourself,
without walking some of the same path that they did.
#20
Quote by edg
ha. yeah that was Mimi all right. Yeah, I can assure you she can play without having
to anchor. It's been a while, but I did sit in front of her for 2 years I used to
pick with my little finger kind of curled around the neck where it meets the body and
she never said a thing.

I think a lot of really good players have been so good for so long, they really forget a lot of what it took to get themselves there. They just can't explain the path very
well and don't make good teachers. We went through jazz song after song after
song, and I couldn't even play a simple ii-V-I very well. I guess she thought I'd
get it by osmosis or something.

That's one thing about trying to infer things from watching someone really good.
They have traveled a certain path to get themselves there. You are only seeing
the end result. You can't just assume you can apply thier end result to yourself,
without walking some of the same path that they did.


I think what you can infer by watching her is that her technique isnt nearly as important as her musicality. She anchors... and sounds wonderful.

As far as taking lessons. Did she give you any technique advice at all?
You say you went through jazz songs. If she didnt teach you what a ii V I was, what did she teach? what was her approach?

Did she just have you play through jazz standards with no instruction?
#21
The main point is, she didn't HAVE to keep her hand on the guitar to steady it
to pick accurately. That is really what the whole issue is about. But, that's just
a dead horse I'm tired of beating, infer what you want....

No, she didn' t teach any technique (that I can recall).

She'd give me a song to learn. She'd show me a bunch of things I could play
over the changes. I knew enough about scales to get the gist of what she was
talking about, but not nearly well enough to really use them in really even the most
simple of contexts. We'd play the chords and jam. Mostly with my end of things
clearly floundering. That would be a week or two, and then on to the next song.
Basically it was a shell game.

You can't just throw someone in the deep end of the pool if they don't know how
to swim that well. You start out in the shallow end. She wasn't very good on the
shallow part. I mean now *I* can see exactly what I needed then. At that point
I didn't know what I needed to know. The teacher is supposed to know that.

I don't have anything against Mimi. She's a nice person and obviously a real player.
I'm not sure if she was putting in her best teaching effort or just showing up because
teaching pays the bills. I learned some basic jazz chord voicings. That's about
the best I can say I got out of those couple years of lessons.
#22
Quote by edg
The main point is, she didn't HAVE to keep her hand on the guitar to steady it
to pick accurately. That is really what the whole issue is about. But, that's just
a dead horse I'm tired of beating, infer what you want....

No, she didn' t teach any technique (that I can recall).

She'd give me a song to learn. She'd show me a bunch of things I could play
over the changes. I knew enough about scales to get the gist of what she was
talking about, but not nearly well enough to really use them in really even the most
simple of contexts. We'd play the chords and jam. Mostly with my end of things
clearly floundering. That would be a week or two, and then on to the next song.
Basically it was a shell game.

You can't just throw someone in the deep end of the pool if they don't know how
to swim that well. You start out in the shallow end. She wasn't very good on the
shallow part. I mean now *I* can see exactly what I needed then. At that point
I didn't know what I needed to know. The teacher is supposed to know that.

I don't have anything against Mimi. She's a nice person and obviously a real player.
I'm not sure if she was putting in her best teaching effort or just showing up because
teaching pays the bills. I learned some basic jazz chord voicings. That's about
the best I can say I got out of those couple years of lessons.


I hear ya, she didnt have to... but she did choose to. And I agree its a dead a mutilated horse, that I dont care to kick anymore either.

As far as her teaching style, your right, not all great players are great teachers. I also agree that you need a foundation ( starting in the shallow end)... before you jump in the deep end. I've had some teachers like that as well. Awesome players, but not necesarrily great at showing you how to get there.
#23
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Shawn Lane, Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai and Rusty Cooley. Please also note that palm muting is not anchoring.

Edit: Also note: Steve Morse anchors and has CTS because of it. Anchoring = bad.

And Shawn Lane had no tendon damage, arthritis, or any other health issues whatsoever! [/sarcasm]

Posting your pinky isn't an unforgivable sin. I do it so I have a better sense of where I am on my guitar and it helps me with relative distance for sweeping. Plenty of professional guitarists will anchor and still be sicker than most of us ever will ad have remained healthy.
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#24
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Actually it's interesting top note that towards then end of his life that guitar playing was the one thing that absolutely wasn't affected by the disease. Probably hasn't got a lot to do with his technique but still; interesting.


Actually the SL fan community has removed from circulation a number of gigs due to the fact that it was extremely upsetting for some (especially his family) to see him in such a state. The last gig of him being a textbook example.

And lets not forget, he basically quit guitar for six years due to his tendonitis and arthritis.
#25
Quote by troyponce
And Shawn Lane had no tendon damage, arthritis, or any other health issues whatsoever! [/sarcasm]


He had his disease from the age of 13, it was completely unrelated to his guitar playing.

Anyway, even if you remove him from the list of players the rest should be evidence enough.
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“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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