#1
Alright well i learnt the pentatonic scale, and now i'm working on the Japanese scales. What other important scales would you guys recommend?
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#2
Major and minor are always good.
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#3
pent's major/minors. Lydian is good to, its so epic.


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#5
Major - it's the one scale you HAVE to learn. If you don't know it then you can't actually learn any other scales, except as dot-to-dots.
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#6
Quote by steven seagull
Major - it's the one scale you HAVE to learn. If you don't know it then you can't actually learn any other scales, except as dot-to-dots.


Can you please explain. Because I never really understood why this is. Does learning the major scale help you memorize the notes or something like that. Because I know the minor pentatonic, and it isn't doing much for me except me using a few licks to improvise with. Could learning the major scale help open new improvisation opportunities for me and expand my horizons? Because I feel I need to improve in this area, thanks.
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#7
All other scales are described by how they relate to the major scale.

So C major is C D E F G A B, which is described as 1 2 3 4 5 6 7.
C natural minor is C D Eb F G Ab Bb, which is described as 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7.
This is because we take the C major scale, and lower the 3rd, 6th and 7th by one semitone.

And the modes are formed from the major scale, using different notes of the scale as the root.
#8
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

This is a great article explaining music theories' basics. I had to read it through a few times to fully understand it.

If you want to expand your horizons, i seriously reccomend getting some theory in your head. It may be hard to understand at first but the end product IMO is worth it.

It will explain why you need to learn the major scale too. In laments terms, most scales (at least how they are written down as intervals) are based on variants of the major scale...
#9
Definitely to all the above....

Basically, the major scale is the focal point of most western music. All the other scales tend to be described relative to it, so once you know it you actually have a huge chunk of knowledge that applies to all sorts of stuff...chord construction, intervals, other scales. As far as the notes go, you just have to learn them. Ultimately the pattern of intervals between the notes is always the same so once you get a feel for it it's easy to find notes anywhere. I found learning the notes on the low E first, then locating octaves and kind of filling in the gaps helped a lot. The first thing you need to know before scales is the notes themselves, in much the same way that you need to learn the alphabet before you can learn how to write properly.

For example, the major pentatonic is the major scale minus 2 notes, but that obviously means very little unless you already know the major scale.

Then there's the whole business of the modes, which Im guessing you've heard about. All they are is the major scale (as in the same pattern of intervals) with a different tonal centre. The modes are very closely linked with the chords you play them over, but again you really need to know the major scale to understand them properly.
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#10
Word of advice. Don't always get bogged down to using 7-note scales (major, minor) all the time. Try using scales that only use 4 or 5 notes in an octave. This will give it a more "odd" but interesting sound.
#11
Quote by plebbers
Word of advice. Don't always get bogged down to using 7-note scales (major, minor) all the time. Try using scales that only use 4 or 5 notes in an octave. This will give it a more "odd" but interesting sound.


...aka pentatonics?
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#13
They're called tetratonic scales. Like a tetrachord has 4 notes, a tetratonic scale has 4 notes. There are some written out .