#1
This is my favourite chord:

----------------
-0-------------
-0--------------
-2-------------
-3-------------
-1-------------


What is it called?
Last edited by wylde_overdrive at Sep 28, 2007,
#2
im not very good with chord names but it seems like it would be some kind of Fm triad
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#3
F major 7 w/o the 3rd.
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#6
Hmmm, according to all-guitar-chords.com, it's an F maj9#11(no 3rd)

It's like a huge combo of what all of you have said
#7
Quote by wylde_overdrive
Hmmm, according to all-guitar-chords.com, it's an F maj9#11(no 3rd)

It's like a huge combo of what all of you have said


haha i would love to see the freak that knew that all from memory. anyways i guess i was way off but o well
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#8
Well it has the following notes:

F C E G B

So you could name it off the C as a root and call it Cmaj11. Or you could name it off the F and call it...uh...actually I don't know what you would name it from with the F as the root .

I would call it Cmaj11.

I don't believe Fmaj9#11(no 3rd) is correct because technically to have a maj9 chord you need the 3rd in the chord other than that I suppose it could be considered correct.
#9
I would just call it a Cmaj11. Naming it with F as the root is too big of a hassle, and, ultimately incorrect in my opinion because the C comes off as the root more than the F when it is played.

^Tsunoyukami knows what he's talking about
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#10
Quote by ~Rock~Guitarist
I would just call it a Cmaj11. Naming it with F as the root is too big of a hassle, and, ultimately incorrect in my opinion because the C comes off as the root more than the F when it is played.

^Tsunoyukami knows what he's talking about


Haha

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#11
Quote by Tsunoyukami
Well it has the following notes:

F C E G B

So you could name it off the C as a root and call it Cmaj11. Or you could name it off the F and call it...uh...actually I don't know what you would name it from with the F as the root .

I would call it Cmaj11.

I don't believe Fmaj9#11(no 3rd) is correct because technically to have a maj9 chord you need the 3rd in the chord other than that I suppose it could be considered correct.

But the chord name explicitly states there is no 3rd in the chord...
#12
its a Cmaj11 people. if you just play the chord its obvious C is the root, and it has the 4th which is F, which is ultimatly the 11th
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#13
Quote by st.stephen
But the chord name explicitly states there is no 3rd in the chord...


I know it states that there is no third in the chord but technically (from what I know about chords at least) you would not be able to name it that due to the fact that calling something a major 7 means that it contains both the third and seventh.

Maybe it does work, but I'm not 100% sure. I still prefer Cmaj11.
#14
To analyne a chord look at it as a root, 1st inversion, 2nd inversion, and sometime a 3rd inversion. See what you come up with.
#16
Quote by Tsunoyukami
I know it states that there is no third in the chord but technically (from what I know about chords at least) you would not be able to name it that due to the fact that calling something a major 7 means that it contains both the third and seventh.

Maybe it does work, but I'm not 100% sure. I still prefer Cmaj11.


It can work if you say had C13 with no third, it would still be C13. When you get to more basic chords though the lack of a third is more obvious. But I agree with your Cmaj11.
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#18
Quote by Tsunoyukami
^ Alright, if you say so.

I really just don't understand when you're allowed to remove the third from a chord actually haha.


No rules remember? The bigger the chord the less likely a missing note is going to be noticed me thinks.
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#19
Quote by Tsunoyukami
I know it states that there is no third in the chord but technically (from what I know about chords at least) you would not be able to name it that due to the fact that calling something a major 7 means that it contains both the third and seventh.

You can leave notes out, especially on the guitar where what you play is limited by the amount of fingers you have. Leaving the third out will affect the sound of the chord, but not the theory behind it.
#20
F C E G and B...I'm a chord noob but I got the notes!

Either of the chords the previous guys mentioned sounds logical.
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#21
Im pretty sure that 7th is what implies a maj or min chord rather than the third which implies if it is a for example CM or Cm. So a major third would leave a major chord for example 1 3 5 but this would not be notated Cmaj but rather CM whereas the Cmaj7 would be notated 1 3 5 7 so then then it is shown by the 7 rather than the 3rd.
I would probably notate this F/Cmaj11 to show that the F is the bass note and the maj in this shows the major 7.
But i may be wrong so correct me if im wrong!
#22
Quote by Chris_Sleeps
You can leave notes out, especially on the guitar where what you play is limited by the amount of fingers you have. Leaving the third out will affect the sound of the chord, but not the theory behind it.


Ahh that makes sense.

Personally I would never drop the third as it is one of the most important notes. The first note I would drop is the fifth and depending on the chord either the 1/9/11/13 but I would always keep the 3rd and 7th in there.