#1
i was wondering how say a band is writing in d harmonic minor, but then all of a sudden they throw in an an E flat and an A flat and maybe an F sharp and still not go out of key? is there a particular term used to describe this?
#2
passing tones?
chromaticisms?
full out modulation?

it depends on exactly what way its done
#5
Quote by glcometdude32
i was wondering how say a band is writing in d harmonic minor, but then all of a sudden they throw in an an E flat and an A flat and maybe an F sharp and still not go out of key?

If they are playing notes not in that scale, they are going out of key. It doesn't neccesarily mean it sounds rubbish, but they are definetly going out of the key.
#6
Going out of key is actually a good thing, since staying in one key tends to sound monotonous after some point.
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#7
The term is accidentals. When used as passing tones in fast passages, they give that cool chromatic feel, and when landed right on they add tension nicely.
#9
Quote by glcometdude32
well for example, the wicked end by avenged sevenfold does this a lot


Yeah, there are a lot of accidentals (note outside of the key) in that song. The reason they don't sound bad is because a lot of them are used as passing tones (notes to connect two different notes that are apart of the key). Also, there is a lot of, what i would call a tasteful use of chromaticism. They play notes that are flat out not in D minor, but they are used in a way so that they don't sound bad, they just give a slightly altered sound to the lead. The best way to incorporate this element into your songwriting would just be trial and error, sometimes it will sound good, sometimes it won't.
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#10
It also depends on what passing tones you use. You could be playing in D harmonic minor and trow in an F#, which is from D major, or a C natural, which come from the D natural minor scale. As in borrowing tones from other D based scales.
#11
Accidental =/= a note out of key, it is the term for a musical symbol which is used to lower or raise a pitch. Generally this is from the key signature but not necessarily, you get reinder accidentals eg if it was a B natural in the bar before but a Bb in the next you sometimes see the b accidental given.
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