#1
Not because I want to copy Children of Bodom ('cus I really don't want to) but I'd like to know how they write some of their melodic stuff. They don't follow scales completely of course. Can someone perhaps give me some basic guidelines?
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#3
thought about it. Am learning their stuff. Just finished Downfall, but right now I'm learning the song Evil Eye by the hairy Yngwie. And after that I might wanna try "La Bamba" as Mattias Eklundh does it. It's good to try a little of everything. But I know there's some theory behind some of it. Somehow. Thought maybe someone knew a little.
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#4
Quote by PhantomNote
Not because I want to copy Children of Bodom ('cus I really don't want to) but I'd like to know how they write some of their melodic stuff. They don't follow scales completely of course. Can someone perhaps give me some basic guidelines?


Do they not? I'd always though they did for the melody lines, they never sound like they go out of scales. As for their riffs, chromatism, tritones, the usual stuff :P
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#5
Of course they stay in key. I hear hardly any chromaticism in any of their songs. Sometimes they substitute in notes like a major 7th, but other than that, it's just straight minor scales.
#6
Quote by CowboyUp
Of course they stay in key. I hear hardly any chromaticism in any of their songs. Sometimes they substitute in notes like a major 7th, but other than that, it's just straight minor scales.


+1


The best way to find how a band makes their music is to study their playing and learn a lot of their songs.
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#7
I don't think that their music is really special, but I'll give you some hints about it, as far as this is possible on the fly now.

Let's pick Hatebreeder.
A simple rhythm, which is steady throughout a whole passage (|0-0000|0-0000|... ; triplets, but they are not that important) and lots of palm muted notes. The pause between them is very important, as it adds heavyness. Too many pauses might kill that speed-feeling, so you want to use them not TOO much. A too "complex" rhythm might kill the flow. CoB songs rather use simple and "old" rhythms and riffs and add their signature sound (orchestra hits, synths, speed - they are VERY important here) to make them sound new.

To add more intensity, use some chords. CoB don't use powerchords only, they are rather rare. You'll find more thirds (Root - b3 or 3) too (sometimes harmonized with two guitars, sometimes one guitar alone with variations. But they help to sound like CoB or many other modern metal bands [with exceptions of course]). An example is 00:09 in the song.
Don't use palm muted notes only.
High pinch harmonics at "final" notes are also very common.

Another very important thing is that you'll want to employ happy melodies. That can be either done by arpeggiating major chords (or progressions), or just by starting to write a simple melody and building all the rest around it.

You'll also find lots of sweeping and three-notes-per-string arpeggios (12-14-15 || 12-14-15 etc.)

To add variations to the riffs, play them with one guitar only, then with a harmonizing instrument (2nd guitar and/or synths). Think of development. They do that alot.

The synths are rather sharp, not mellow. They sound a little different without the other instruments, because they get lost in the mix a little, so take care when creating them.

Drums are fairy simple, lots of doublebass and snare plus the "big" cymbals (crash, chinese, ride etc.) with toms used as fills.


As a conclusion, the most important aspects are the happy melodies (which are often fast and not so easy to play) and the synths.
^ seconded.

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Last edited by Philipp Sobecki at Sep 30, 2007,
#8
try arpeggios as well. and some sweeping if you can (i sure as hell cant lol). and and keyboards...
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#9
hey don't mean to hijack but Philipp Sobecki, you made quite a good analysis of the bare basics of CoB songs. I am into dragonforce and was wondering if you can analyze their songs similarly. Thanks
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#10
Look, I won't use keyboards 'cus I dont want to copy CoB. I'm more into Frank Zappa, Freak Kitchen, Mattias Eklundh and some 80's rock. So when I'm gonna write songs for the band, those will be my major influences combined with weird things. And okay, I'm not a theory expert since I've only been interested in music this much for a half year and has used the most of the time learning songs (I cant sweep on more than three strings yet though, but I master alternative picking pretty perfect and tapping goes nicely as well). I can see they follow scales, but if I use some of the very expensive and kvlt music programs that I borrowed from my dad and analyze it..there pops up alot of scales, and well. But thanks for the help really . Atleast you didn't punch me for being naive and stupid. xD

So i basically I got how they make it. It's always cool to know. I have my own ways of making music, but I can sure use this information.

About the technique in it, I will master that. You just have to push yourself if stuff is hard.
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Last edited by PhantomNote at Oct 1, 2007,
#11
Quote by areola
hey don't mean to hijack but Philipp Sobecki, you made quite a good analysis of the bare basics of CoB songs. I am into dragonforce and was wondering if you can analyze their songs similarly. Thanks


I wasn't able to listen to them that much before, but I'll check it out. Maybe you can start a new thread? Or maybe we can do an "the ONLY analysis thread"

And yeah, that were just the basics.
^ seconded.

Äh, Sie wollen also mit Schlitz.
#12
Just play/write what you hear in your head , i bet thats what they do ,aswell as all other musicians.
#13
Quote by Evil_Magician
Just play/write what you hear in your head , i bet thats what they do ,aswell as all other musicians.


I do that. But theory never hurt anyone.

And yeah, I think there should be an "The only analysis thread". Would be very useful
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#14
Quote by Evil_Magician
Just play/write what you hear in your head , i bet thats what they do ,aswell as all other musicians.


Yap, that's the deal, but he wanted to know how to write CoB-like, and he is hearing different music in his head than Alexi.

You can always use (and you always do, even if you don't know it) some other work as a starting point.
^ seconded.

Äh, Sie wollen also mit Schlitz.
#15
Quote by Philipp Sobecki
Yap, that's the deal, but he wanted to know how to write CoB-like, and he is hearing different music in his head than Alexi.

You can always use (and you always do, even if you don't know it) some other work as a starting point.


yup, but my starting points are basically Frank Zappa and weird music . Anyways, the idea about describing artists I really think someone (or I will) do it. I can explain the bands that I'm most into easily. And we just got CoB.

The music I'm hearing in my head is very scary. Heavy metal and happy la bamba stuff. I can't wait till I get the band going (when we're all set..in maybe a half year we are ready to practice). I will still continue to practice guitar like a mad though
Ibanez s540 with gold Schaller bridge and OMGGOLD hardware

Ibanez RGR320 with Lo-Edge Pro bridge and scalloped fretboard

Lee Jackson XLSC - 500

Roland Microcube

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#17
Quote by Philipp Sobecki
I don't think that their music is really special, but I'll give you some hints about it, as far as this is possible on the fly now.

Let's pick Hatebreeder.
A simple rhythm, which is steady throughout a whole passage (|0-0000|0-0000|... ; triplets, but they are not that important) and lots of palm muted notes. The pause between them is very important, as it adds heavyness. Too many pauses might kill that speed-feeling, so you want to use them not TOO much. A too "complex" rhythm might kill the flow. CoB songs rather use simple and "old" rhythms and riffs and add their signature sound (orchestra hits, synths, speed - they are VERY important here) to make them sound new.

To add more intensity, use some chords. CoB don't use powerchords only, they are rather rare. You'll find more thirds (Root - b3 or 3) too (sometimes harmonized with two guitars, sometimes one guitar alone with variations. But they help to sound like CoB or many other modern metal bands [with exceptions of course]). An example is 00:09 in the song.
Don't use palm muted notes only.
High pinch harmonics at "final" notes are also very common.

Another very important thing is that you'll want to employ happy melodies. That can be either done by arpeggiating major chords (or progressions), or just by starting to write a simple melody and building all the rest around it.

You'll also find lots of sweeping and three-notes-per-string arpeggios (12-14-15 || 12-14-15 etc.)

To add variations to the riffs, play them with one guitar only, then with a harmonizing instrument (2nd guitar and/or synths). Think of development. They do that alot.

The synths are rather sharp, not mellow. They sound a little different without the other instruments, because they get lost in the mix a little, so take care when creating them.

Drums are fairy simple, lots of doublebass and snare plus the "big" cymbals (crash, chinese, ride etc.) with toms used as fills.


As a conclusion, the most important aspects are the happy melodies (which are often fast and not so easy to play) and the synths.


you sir are stunningly helpful, i wasn't looking for anything like this but you've really outlined the style and well kudos to you