#1
Alright, i imagine this woud`ve been talked about before...

Does anyone else think learning the guitar is EASY now the internet is around????

Back in the day, u had to listen carefully to the record, put it on cassette, pause - rewind, figure out the key, try & figure out what scale is used for improv, then give up & throw ur axe at the amp in disgust.
Nowadays, type in the song & theres a hundred different tabs & soloutions!!!

Don`t get me wrong, i`m not bitter - I really wish all this stuff was at my fingertips 15 yrs ago- Man, i would`ve practiced a lot more!
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#2
It is a lot easier, however it's a double edged sword. Kids seem to spend far too much time worrying about what they DON'T know or DON'T have, rather than learning at a natural pace and discovering things for themselves. I didn't play a pinch harmonic for 5 years, but that's because I didn't find out about them until then...it didn't bother me, I learned them when I needed too. However, you get people who've been playing a month posting on here asking "What techniques do I need to learn to play blah-de-blah" and they get bombarded with all this stuff that they suddenly think they need to know NOW!

Kids don't seem to want to learn for themselves now, they just want someone to tell them how to do everything, what strings to buy, how far to turn the knobs on their amp, what songs to learn...the last one is the one I really don't understand. I was never even remotely close to running out of stuff to learn, by the time I started playing there were hundreds of songs I wanted to learn and there still are.

The equipment obsession is worrying too - again we just use to experiment with our gear and work out how to get the best sounds out of it. Now it's just "I need to know what kind of strings John Frusciante uses because I'm completely up his bum and need to sound exactly like him".

UG and the internet are fantastic for guitarists, but some people don't seem to realise that no matter how much information is out there the internet can't actually learn to play for you.
Actually called Mark!

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#3
What u say is all very true Mark, I`m having a hard time telling my son to "slow down" - he wants to know RHCP solos before he can extend the blues scale 5 frets!

Yes i agree, but i still would`ve appreciated the tab info that is available now - it trully is amazing!

As for equipment, u r right too! Just get a Bl**DY guitar that looks cool & turn it UP!
Quote by George Harrison
I can`t put more than 4 notes together in a run
#4
i'm a beginner (sort of, been playing a year), 15 yrs old, and i still get what you're saying. odd, i think. yeah, i've seen far too many people that don't care about how they get better, just what to know so they sound better. like "what should i set my amp to sound like slash?" oh well. oh yeah, i did my first pinch harmonic within a week of starting , but it was sorta accidental


its a good topic for a thread though
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#5
hey... I don't ask (anymore) everybody how to achieve Froooshy's sound... well I did it
so I agree with You guys... I'm just 16 so my life experience is really little... You know what You are talking about
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#6
Kids, appreciate the knowledge thats so easy for you to grab now & don`t be afraid to go waaaay back to the `roots` - learn some chuck berry/elvis/bb king - look at some of those old solos - u`ll see the jumps that came thru the beatles/hendrix & zeppelin.
Quote by George Harrison
I can`t put more than 4 notes together in a run
#7
^Brilliant advice...modern guitar playing didn't just appear one day, it evolved gradually from other forms. The best favour you can do for yourself as a player is to follow that evolution yourself. Obviously it's not going to take you 50 years to play metal, you can follow it through in a few months to be honest, however if you can see where everyhthing leads back to you'll understand what came after so much better. I did a massive rambling (and possibly drunk) post about that a while back, I'll see if I can dig it out...

Here, be warned though, it's LONG!

Quote by drunken steven seagull
You have to stop trying to play certain songs or even genres and instead concentrate on learning to play the guitar...they're two different things.

The best way to solo is to learn the history of the solo...modern metal soloing didn't just appear, the style evolved as subseqent generations of musicians built on what had been done before. Start with simple blues solos, listen to Muddy Waters and BB King, even early Clapton and learn how to improvise over the 1-IV-V chord progression, then speed things up by moving through the rock and roll years copping licks from Chuck Berry, before long you're into the 60's where powerhouse bands like The Who and Cream made things more aggressive and intense than ever before.

Then a young bluesman named James Marshall Hendrix, came to England to seek his fortune and everything changed...the ultimate showman who turned whose incendiary playing inspired a generation. Thanks to the Yardbirds Britain gained it's own holy trinity of rock with Clapton flanked by Page and Beck...and whilst the jagged riffs of Keith Richards vied with the lyrical lines of George Harrison a storm was brewing.

Whilst Ritchie Blackmore embodied the flamboyance of the classical composers, out of the gloomy industrial wasteland of Birmingham Tony Iommi was forging dark, gutwrenching riffs. The piercing twin rapiers of Glenn Tipton and KK Downing followed closely, and were in kind met by the twin broadswords of Murray and Smith. The storm grew, and America took notice.

Whilst Aerosmith grooved with Whitford and Perry, Ace Frehley set the sky ablaze, Tom Scholz made beautiful music and Billy Gibbons taught harmonics how to snarl. Johnny Ramone taught us that it didn't matter how good you were as long as you looked cool, with Joe Strummer his most dilligent disciple. Then a young Dutch kid eclipsed it all and Eddie Van Halen exploded onto the scene. Jaws dropped, and by the time they were picked up the guitar landscape had changed again.

Just as we were struggling to see over the rapidly expanding hair of CC Deville and Ritchie Sambora, along came Randy Rhoads to remind us what class and taste were. Mustaine and Hetfield couldn't settle their differences but we at least got two bands for the price of one, ably assisted by Kirk Hammett who picked up his chops from a guy named Joe. Joe taught Steve too, and the two of them inspired a shredding arms race. Marty Friedman and Paul Gilbert dazzled us at breakneck speed, Ritchie Blackmore's lovechild Yngwie Malmsteem swept us up in a wave of classical renaissance and we all laughed at Michaelangelo Batio. Even the jazzers upped the stakes, George Benson was no slouch but the likes of John Mclaughlin, Frank Gambale and Allan Holdsworth weren't even on this planet at times.

The precision of shred and the power of metal collided head on as bands got faster and heavier. Jeff Hahnneman and Kerry King led the way as Chuck Schuldiner, Alex Skolnik and Andreas Kisser crushed nations beneath their amplifiers. Kurt Cobain reminded us that how you play is just as important as what you play, and thousands unfurled their plaid shirts to pay homage to him and his peers Kim Thayill, Mike McCready, Stone Gossard and Big, Sick, Ugly Jim Martin.

Nothing defeats the metal though, and as John Petrucci seemingly waged a one-man crusade against technical ignorance the thunderous roar of detuned mayhem came forth. Darkest Europe spawned Alexi Laiho, Mike Amott and the monstrous Mohammed Suicimez.
In England, Herman Li and Sam Totman reminded us not to take ourselves too seriously, whilst the blessed Synyster Gates reminded us that you can become a famous guitarist no matter how much you suck...

That's a fraction, a tiny snapshot of the history of the guitar - it barely scratches the surface. But, more than anything else, THAT'S what you have to do...immerse yourself in it, listen to anything and everything you can and learn from it all. Every piece of guitar music in existence has something to teach you, every player should be an example in some way, their style, their passion, their ability. The more you listen to the more you'll learn, don't aim to be "a good metal guitarist", just aim to be a good guitarist and you'll naturally evolve into the player you're supposed to be.

Love the guitar...know the guitar...play the guitar...Profit!
Actually called Mark!

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#8
Can't be asked to read your post Steven, though I'm sure it's genius.

In this day and age, thanks to the internet, their are many more ****ty guitar players, and even fewer real ones.
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#9
Holy ****! Thats an amazing history Mark! lol

SHould be made compulsory in primary school - well done!
Quote by George Harrison
I can`t put more than 4 notes together in a run
#10
The reverse thinking of this thread is - imagine how many people `wouldn`t` be playing the riffs from `SNOW HEY HO` RHCP, if the net were not around?

Our ears would be better off imho- but i`d also be trying to work it out (for 2 weeks - then i`d play it for 2 yrs before realising it was slightly wrong and correcting it!) lol
Quote by George Harrison
I can`t put more than 4 notes together in a run
#11
Quote by steven seagull

The equipment obsession is worrying too - again we just use to experiment with our gear and work out how to get the best sounds out of it. Now it's just "I need to know what kind of strings John Frusciante uses because I'm completely up his bum and need to sound exactly like him".


Also, a lot of kids ask what guitar they need to buy because they think it will magically make them better. Don't get me wrong, I know a good guitar from a bad one, and I would love to own a classic Les Paul or a nice Strat, but any guitarist can do just fine with the basics.

In response to the topic, I would not call it "easy". Learning the guitar is not easy no matter how many teachers, programs, or resources you have. It is easier than it was back then, but it still takes years of practice and a lot of commitment.

I think the problem is that people are too spoiled these days. They don't realise that they are on UG.com. If people back then had had access to something like this, it would have been godsend.
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#12
I love the fact that I can just look up a tab for a song...granted they're often wrong, but it at least gives me a starting point and saves me a lot of time working stuff out.
Actually called Mark!

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#13
yea i can't imagine playing without the internet, thank god i started when the internet was around :P i would have exploded if i had to tab my own stuff :P
#14
Quote by dgme92
i'm a beginner (sort of, been playing a year), 15 yrs old, and i still get what you're saying. odd, i think. yeah, i've seen far too many people that don't care about how they get better, just what to know so they sound better. like "what should i set my amp to sound like slash?" oh well. oh yeah, i did my first pinch harmonic within a week of starting , but it was sorta accidental


its a good topic for a thread though


ive been playing for a year and i started pinch harmonics because. i was told by alot of people i sounded like ive been playing for 5 years but ive only been playing for a year (in october) but my teacher was an amazing guitarist like WOW soo i guess that kinda helped also i masterd pinch harmonics within id say about a couple of months but its because i practise for 4 to 2 hours a day at least
#15
Quote by dgme92
oh well. oh yeah, i did my first pinch harmonic within a week of starting , but it was sorta accidental




Haha I keep doing those accidental pinch harmonics too.
#17
Nah, they peaked in the 70's...the later material was cack.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#18
The internet has made some things easier if you know what you're looking for,
but for the most part it has just allowed stupidity and ignorance to spread faster.

Just witness the number of posts around here where somebody has been playing
guitar for even a couple or more years, yet doesn't even know the very first, most
basic of things about music. I mean really basic stuff.

If I had a dime for every person who said they "know" how to play a song, but if
you put a metronome in from of them and asked them to play in time, they couldn't
if thier life depended on it....