#1
Ok, not just the major scale, but I thought that title was somewhat clever. Anyway, I've got a few questions about scales.

First off, How on earth do box scales work? I know the major scale is WWHWWWHW, or something along those lines. I also know the minor scale goes something like that as well. However, I don't understand how the whole-whole-half-ect thing relates to the box scales (those are the scales where it is like two or three notes on the low E string, then a few more on the A, ect., right?). I understand if you were playing the major scale on just, say, the D string, that you would start with an open string, then the second fret, then the fourth, fifth, and so on. But I don't understand at all how you get a box scale out of the scales, and how working up the strings on those notes in the scale is still the same scale as if you played it on just one string.

And also, with the scale, can you hop strings? Like say you are in the d major scale (so the d string), and then hop over to the G string. So, you play the ninth fret, then seventh, then fifth on the D string, can you then hop over and play those same notes in a solo or whatever on the G string with it still being in D major? Or would that make it into G major. If so, are you allowed to go from D to G major?

Furthermore, say you are playing in C major. Since there is no open C string, would you first place your fretting hand on, say, the C note of the low E string. Do you just continue on from there?


Basically, I am confused as hell about scales in general. Any help would be GREATLY appreciated.
#2
Check out cyberfret.com if you already haven't.

Other than that, I'm of no help because I don't know my scales or the alphabet stuff to go with them. I just mostly know what sound lies on what fret and string.
#3
OK. You're very confused. You haven't said anything inherently wrong, but you've got the applications mixed up. The pattern to form a major scale in the key of the note you start on is WWHWWWH. I remember it by thinkging WWH, W, then WWH again.

Playing up and down one string will give you a scale, but as I'm sure you've noticed it's not very useful. The idea is to keep your hand in one place and move your fingers. Play the notes of the scale on the low E string. When you can't play a higher note without moving your hand, find that note on the next string. There's a few ways that the scale can come out. There are several lessons on this site that will give you pattens that you can use for major, minor, blues, pentatonic, melodic, harmonic, etc scales. Once you memorize these patterns you can move them up and down the fretboard so that the key will change accordingly.

I don't think I'm doing a very good job of explaining this, try looking in the lessons section. There's also a pretty good Essential Scales Tab available here:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/m/misc_scales/essential_scales_tab.htm
#4
Pick a note on the guitar...any note, doesn't matter which. Now see how many instances of that note, or its octaves, you can find...there'll be at least ten of them, notes repeat all over on the guitar. Not only that, they repeat in a constant pattern.

That means when you play a major scale you can play all the notes along one string, or you can play them on different strings. So if you start an A major scale at the 5th fret of the low E your second note would be perhaps the B at the 7th, but the next note could be the C# at the 9th fret, or the C# at the 4th fret on the A string...it just depends how you're feeling.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#5
Quote by steven seagull
Pick a note on the guitar...any note, doesn't matter which. Now see how many instances of that note, or its octaves, you can find...there'll be at least ten of them, notes repeat all over on the guitar. Not only that, they repeat in a constant pattern.

That means when you play a major scale you can play all the notes along one string, or you can play them on different strings. So if you start an A major scale at the 5th fret of the low E your second note would be perhaps the B at the 7th, but the next note could be the C# at the 9th fret, or the C# at the 4th fret on the A string...it just depends how you're feeling.



Ah, so does it not matter how far away the two notes are on the actual fretboard, so long as they follow the pattern? Like, you start the A major scale at the 5th fret of the low E, could your second note, B, be on the High E's 7th fret? Or one of the, say, D string's B notes? Could you just play the next note of the scale anywhere on the fretboard?
#6
Quote by Ringtone
Ah, so does it not matter how far away the two notes are on the actual fretboard, so long as they follow the pattern? Like, you start the A major scale at the 5th fret of the low E, could your second note, B, be on the High E's 7th fret? Or one of the, say, D string's B notes? Could you just play the next note of the scale anywhere on the fretboard?


The position of the note on the fretboard doesn't really matter as such, as long as it's the right note. However in practice the notes always pretty much fall in the same place due to the tuning of the guitar's strings, and you'll only get 2 or 3 instances of the same octave of a note. Any note you play will also appear on the next string up 5 frets further down, excebt with the B string as it's tuned differently. Any note on the G string is repeated 4 frets down on the B string, but the relationship between the B and top E is 5 frets again.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com