#1
why do we find certain notes played in a certain order, or played together pleasing? why do some sound like awful noise?
#3
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#4
its not the notes themselves as much as the space between the notes. from what i understand it's basically a mathematical relationship
#5
Agreed. As two or more different sound waves line up with each other, we get harmony. If the interval is a pleasant one, you'll get a lovely sound.

although, we know that part of it is also environment. What sounds pleasing to some eastern asian countries is much different than some western sounding music, traditionally, anyway.
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#6
^ and subsequently its also the movement of the notes, such as, by itself a root + b5 interval isn't terribly pleasing but in the right context of movement it sounds wonderful
#8
Its all about Conssonance and Dissonance, which yes is the mathemetical intervals between the notes..read up on those two terms and u will understand
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#9
Also, its what we are used to hearing... if all of our life we heard different intervals we would like them more... if you are intrested in it read a book called "This is Your Brain on Music"... i didnt read the whole thing cuz i didnt have time.. but its an intresting read
#10
Each interval has it own unique sound. For example, a minor second is the most dissonant interval. Play a note up (major second) and you'll get a much more melodic, bluesy feeling note.
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#11
This is, as already said, a thing of maths and culture.
The basics in europe are a result of the overtone scala, which leads to pentatonics (thats why so many cultures have employes them) and then, through other processes (which could have been different or layed out in another order, but that's just a matter of "luck", as well as a matter of conventions. Ionian is not the most consonant scale of our modes, but lydian is it. But our ears are biased to forget this unlogical thing [which isn't bad. just don't think that some cultures are better than others]).

The second aspect is culture. For us, eastern music sounds weird, but they say the same about our music. Same goes to the minor second as the most dissonant interval. There are more dissonant intervals, like quatertones etc, but we don't use them for several stupid reasons.
With the opening of cultures in the modern times and the deconstruction of tonality, it's just personal preference what sounds good and what not. This goes to the most imaginable extremes.

So,
be tolerant and don't think that your religion is better than all the others
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#12
I actually don't think eastern music sounds weird. I liked it from the first time I heard it. Explain that :p .
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#13
I think it's all about what you hear when you are young. When I was a kid I listened to all kinds of music, from Jazz, to Classical, and Classic Rock, and of course I was big with '90s Grunge, having grown up with it.

As a result, a lot of the music I write has a dissonant sound and uses intervals that aren't exactly pleasant. I also play a lot of unintentional progressive rock / metal.

But I believe that the note before and after is what defines the sound of the music. Two notes can sound wrong, but the third could make it right.
#14
well it is not just eastern or western music, it is the music that you grew up with, for instance i grew up with classic rock (my dad inflicted it on me a great deal) so i have a great love of led zepplin and neil young, but i have developed my own tastes, actually i can think of a good experiment for this, play a young child in developing stages two dissonant notes for about 5 mins/hr a day for 6 months and then play the child two other notes, consonant probably and see the reaction you get, anyway, you hear what you want to hear mainly but really everything is context.
#15
of course this is as vague as why anything else is enjoyable. biology and life, in different doses depending on who you listen to.
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#16
Quote by Mud Martian
I think it's all about what you hear when you are young. When I was a kid I listened to all kinds of music, from Jazz, to Classical, and Classic Rock, and of course I was big with '90s Grunge, having grown up with it.

As a result, a lot of the music I write has a dissonant sound and uses intervals that aren't exactly pleasant. I also play a lot of unintentional progressive rock / metal.

But I believe that the note before and after is what defines the sound of the music. Two notes can sound wrong, but the third could make it right.


I agree, lot's of people say Igor Stravinsky is hard to listen to, but I listended to the Rite of Spring since I was 6, and I love it, because as a child I understood he was trying to show a sense of chaos. (I was a child genius, I could do basic algebra in the first grade, but my intelligence just kinda leveled off when I turned 13.) So now I can listen to stuff that most people would cover thier ears for, and listen to it and love. I too have loved asian music ever since I first heard it.
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#17
Overtones.
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You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#18
Music sounds the way it does to us because we're psychologically conditioned by our environment to hear it the way it is. Dissonance, major and minor are not concepts we're born with. Even from a very young age we begin to associate major with happy and minor with sad due to their respective use in popular music to convey a set mood and that develops into our natural musical tendencies later and the way we hear things now.
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#19
I would speculate that the reason some notes sound wonderful together and others sound disgusting has to do with physics and how sounds are created and such.

However, in terms of music I believe it has to do with intervals and such.