#1
Hey guys this is gonna sound really newbie but im sort of new to improvising, especially in a set key. There is a group of us at 6th Form who are going to put on a little gig at christmas and we decided we wanted to play Johnny B. Goode as one of our songs.
This is how i play the bass

G--------------------------------------4-5-4-----]
D------4-5-4-----------4-5-4-------4-7-------7-4-]
A--4-7-------7-4---4-7-------7-4-5---------------]
E-5--------------5-------------------------------]

G----------------------6-------4-----------------]
D------4-5-4-------6-9-----4-7---------4-5-4-----]
A--4-7-------7-4-7-------5---------4-7-------7-4-]
E-5------------------------------5---------------]


any ways ive been asked to play a bass solo in there and i am at a complete loss as to what to do with it, please can someone post some suggestions
#3
Usually when I have to do something like that I pick a riff from the song and build on it - doesn't have to be anything flashy, as long as it fits
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#4
Quote by Godbe
Just develop some melodies using the A minor pentatonic box shape.

**** your boxes.

For most 12-bar blues you can get away with using pretty much exclusively the blues scale (in this case, A).
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#5
Quote by Me2NiK
**** your boxes.

For most 12-bar blues you can get away with using pretty much exclusively the blues scale (in this case, A).

there's nothing wrong with playing in a paticular box..if that's all you can do than yeah it needs to be worked on but sometimes jumping around the neck wouldn't be appropriate.
#6
Playing within a particular box will confine your theory to... a box.
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#7
Firstly I wouldn't use the A Minot Pentatonic Scale because the chords as outline the bass there are A7, D7 and E7. Nowhere do you see any minor chord. Therefore I would recommend the A Major or F#m Scale.

If you don't really know scales or how to apply them you could probably get away with playing the same notes you already use there in a different order and rhythm.

Remember, the final judge is your ear, so don't let scales and theory restrict you - they are only guidelines which can help you.
#8
Ever played a 12-bar blues? Improvised over one? Improvising over I7-IV7-V7 with the major scale is a very rare practice due to the fact that it sounds very awkward and strips the purpose of the dominant chord. Of the... probably near ten years I've been playing jazz (and therefore I-IV-V), I've never used the major scale over 12-bar blues.
People writing songs that voices never shared
No one dared
Disturb the Sound of Silence