#1
I need to record a song with the Boss Mega Distortion (MD-2), which is known for having very annoying feedback. However, I need this tone to record, but the feedback is a problem. How do I record as dirty as I want without so much feedback?

Also, I'm not getting a new pedal.
#2
well, basically, you need a noise supressor and you said you were not going to buy anymore pedals so i dont know. maybe turn the gain down until the feedback is at an acceptable level.
my gear: ibanez destroyer( with gibson 500t pickup), epiphone les paul plus,ampeg electric, marshall jcm2000 triple super lead half stack
#3
Quote by zackk
well, basically, you need a noise supressor and you said you were not going to buy anymore pedals so i dont know. maybe turn the gain down until the feedback is at an acceptable level.


Sorry, I meant that I'm not getting another distortion box.
#4
If you're recording into your computer's sound card just keep the volume of your sound card input higher than your guitar/amp volume. Then the distortion will sound fine and translate into the recording without feedback or extra distortion.
#5
^Huh?
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Quote by BrianApocalypse
Good call

Man, you should be a mod, you know everything.

#6
Quote by Paul Carbonella
I need to record a song with the Boss Mega Distortion (MD-2), which is known for having very annoying feedback. However, I need this tone to record, but the feedback is a problem. How do I record as dirty as I want without so much feedback?


Well, feedback is generated when you get a loop of audio going through your system that feeds back on itself (lame explanation I know but it will have to do for now). So unless you're positioning yourself in front of your amp so that your pickups can pick up the sound waves from the speaker you shouldn't have any problem with feedback (although, in all honesty, this will also depend a bit on the room). One way to solve this is to place the amp in another room and the player in the control room if you have one (just separating the player and the amp usually does the trick regardless of whether or not you have an actual control room). If you have to be in the same room as the amp try to put as much distance between yourself and the amp as possible and face in opposite directions. One simple way to do this is to stand so that you have the amp slightly behind you on your left and facing away from you. Just make sure that the amp isn't too close to a wall and not "aiming" into a corner.
#7
You need a infamously feedbacking pedal to get a tone? oh dear.

A noise gate isn't going to help.

It'll help the sound of the amplified signal, but it won't improve the audio chain signal. It'll still redistort.

You need to turn the gain right down, by which point you'll probably lose the tone you want.
#9
The basic problem is that whenever you play a track with distortion, the sound always re-overdrives itself by double.

You could doubletrack, which would bring the heavy sound out, but you have to remember that whatever you do, if you can't fix a basic sound at source, your mix won't be optimal.

That said, it's worth a try.

Are you using an amplifier, or just lining the guitar into the pedal and straight into the computer?
#10
Sorry for jacking, but how do you doubletrack? Can I do that using Audacity?
Gear
Fender Hotrod Deville 2x12
Fender MIM Strat | Epi Dot 335
Fulltone '69 mkii | Boss OD-1
'95 RAT2 | '78 IC Big Muff | DL4
#11
Record the piece once. Create a new track (keeping the old one as well) - record the piece again. Thats doubletracking for you.
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Quote by BrianApocalypse
Good call

Man, you should be a mod, you know everything.

#12
Yeah, you record a guitar line.

Then you record the same guitar line, but the two takes are slightly different and this fills the sound out.
#13
oh ok, so the timing has to be perfect for the 2 tracks then.
Gear
Fender Hotrod Deville 2x12
Fender MIM Strat | Epi Dot 335
Fulltone '69 mkii | Boss OD-1
'95 RAT2 | '78 IC Big Muff | DL4
#14
^yes.

Furthermore, if you're going to be doubletracking, I suggest using two complimentary tones to fill the sound out better. Using the exact same tone for both is fine in many contexts, but it's worth a try. I do it constantly.
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