#1
Well I was just wondering how an Electric Guitar is effected by the type of wood its body is made of. In other words, how does body wood affect the tone of a guitar? I know it does, I would just like to know why.
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#2
Depending on the density of the wood and the space in between the grain, it will have a different sound
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#4
Essentially, it's mostly in the density of the wood. Denser body produces sharper sound, less dense body - deeper. To not get deep into the physics of the matter, a string stretched on a piece of styrofoam yields a loose bassy sound, while the same string stretched on a piece of aluminum produces a ringing chime. Same thing with body woods. Alder is more dense than mahogany, so alder makes for a brighter guitar.

There are more factors, like the direction of the grain, quality of the wood, but on the simplest level it's how the density of the body affects the wavelength and speed of the string vibration.
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#5
i thought it was how hard the wood was? or is that just two ways of saying the same thing?
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#6
Quote by Dave_Mc
i thought it was how hard the wood was?


Dave might not be a physics major, but he is a dirty, dirty man.
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#7
Quote by pifty
Essentially, it's mostly in the density of the wood. Denser body produces sharper sound, less dense body - deeper. To not get deep into the physics of the matter, a string stretched on a piece of styrofoam yields a loose bassy sound, while the same string stretched on a piece of aluminum produces a ringing chime. Same thing with body woods. Alder is more dense than mahogany, so alder makes for a brighter guitar.

There are more factors, like the direction of the grain, quality of the wood, but on the simplest level it's how the density of the body affects the wavelength and speed of the string vibration.


Now here is someone who knows his stuff. I totally agree.

Here is my run down of woods that I have experience with:

Laminated Wood (Plywood) - Crap

Agathis - Bland, almost muffled sound No pronounced EQ highs or lows.

Nato - Kinda of like mahogany, but it has a slightly lighter, looser sound in my opinion and can also sound bland

Basswood - Can be muffled sounding, with fairly flat EQ range. Hit or miss in terms of tone. It is a light, soft wood, and not very dense, which means its not as durable as some woods.

Alder - In terms of weight, this falls square in the middle. Tends to geared towards your highs and mids. Durable. Probably the most common wood on guitars

Mahogany - Heavy, and depending on the grade can get even heavier. Has a rich, full sound. Highs, mids, and lows are all pretty balanced, but it does not sound muffled or muddy. In terms of quality, and character, this my favorite wood.

Poplar - You don't see this too often, but its kinda like an alternative to alder. Similar in sound properties, with slightly less pronounced highs and mids with slightly better bass response

You can also get guitars made of ash, maple, and composite materials like parker, but I have not tried too many of any so I can't really comment.
#8
Quote by pifty


Dave might not be a physics major, but he is a dirty, dirty man.




dang i didn't notice how bad that sounded.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?