#1
So I'm looking to be as well rounded of a player as possible, and I'd like to learn new styles of music. The thing is, I don't know what to work on. I'd like to one day be proficient at rock, metal, blues, jazz, funk, and flamenco. I'm decent at some of these styles, but some (such as funk and flamenco) i have very little experience with. My teacher gave me a couple dozen instructional books that he didn't want anymore that cover most of these, but some of them aren't so great. (E.g. One paticular jazz book just gives you progressions and what to solo over them with)

So, does anyone have any ideas of what I could work on to get better at these?
#2
Ask your teacher if he knows the theory for these. He should (at least for rock, metal, blues, jazz, and maybe funk, I've never heard of flamenco) if he's teaching.
#4
funk-learn chord inversions. most of what Funk is.

Flamenco is a whole other world of guitar playing.
#5
If you want to learn Flamenco, or jazz you should get a teacher that specializes in either. Flamenco is a bit different than other classical genres. You fingerpick differently and use different sets of techniques. Jazz stresses extremely proficient improvisational skills and an extremely good ear combined with instumental virtuosity. Both take YEARS to completely master.
#6
Quote by surethingmrvai
Funk: basic major/minor chords played in certain rhythm

Flamenco: Phrygian


erm not really,

for funk u wana look at mainly minor7 and 9th chords with major/minor pentatonic licks thrown in. You've gotta be really hot on ure 16th note rhythm patterns so sit down with a metronome.

what i suggest u do is practice playing 16th notes to the metronome (thats up down up down for each beat of the bar) and alter your muting patterns. For example, try playing only half notes with all the rest muted (so every other click of the metronome is played and all the rest are muted) then quater notes unmuted (so every beat of the metrononme unmuted) then 8ths.

Once u have that down to a reasonable speed start doing the same thing with offbeat rhythms until u can pretty much improvise freely, then add some pentatonic licks say every forth bar (but keep them simple and RHYTHMIC thats the focus)

Ok tat was longer than i intended but have fun, you should find these rhythm patterns useful for blues and flamenco too.
#7
For funk, practice fast, fluent strumming (16th notes being the standard) and learning to release tension so you start muting whenever you feel the whim.
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#8
Quote by AFI_kid
If you want to learn Flamenco, or jazz you should get a teacher that specializes in either. Flamenco is a bit different than other classical genres. You fingerpick differently and use different sets of techniques. Jazz stresses extremely proficient improvisational skills and an extremely good ear combined with instumental virtuosity. Both take YEARS to completely master.


+1
Although, I think YEARS to master is an understatement when it comes to flamenco. awesome classical players have a hard time with flamenco in that they don't thoroughly understand it. Take someone like Pepe Romero, he's a great classical guitarist, but his flamenco is ****.

I don't want to discourage TS but I would look into something else other than flamenco, but if you want to at least be proficient get a flamenco teacher and only study flamenco for a while.
#9
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
For funk, practice fast, fluent strumming (16th notes being the standard) and learning to release tension so you start muting whenever you feel the whim.

I think I'm fairly decent at that, so that's good.


I don't want to discourage TS but I would look into something else other than flamenco, but if you want to at least be proficient get a flamenco teacher and only study flamenco for a while.

really? alright. i wasn't aware that it was that indepth. it's not a big deal though.
#10
Flamenco huh? How come noone's mentioned rasquado's yet, or the compas?
There are several things to flamenco that'll take lifetime's to master and understand.

First of all the one and most importand aspect of flamenco,
the base on wich it's built - the Compas.

The compas is much like a 12 beat measure with the accents on certain beats, Soleares and Alegrias for example uses the compas like this starting on beat one.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

You just play what you have to play and put the accents in place. Still in case of another type of flamenco(my personal favourite) and one of the(if not the)oldest forms of flamenco including guitar the Siguiriyas the Compas starts at beat 8, like this.

8 9 10 11 121 2 3 4 5 6 7

of course not all flamenco are in 3/4th time, the tientos and farruca just to name a few are in 4/4th


So much for the compas, on to the techniques.

- rest strokes
- rasquados
- 5 note tremolo picking.
- golpe

these are signature playing techniques of flamenco. I won't write all of them down here, but just search em on google and youtube and you should learn a lot.
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
UG's Flamenco Club
Last edited by FretboardToAsh at Oct 2, 2007,
#11
Wow, that's difficult stuff. I was trying to count those outloud, and it's difficult accenting some of those beats. good stuff though, thanks!
#12
think the best way to go about it is to start transcribing songs in each style.

i can't stress this enough

TRANSCRIBING IS THE KEY TO ALMOST ANYTHING REGARDING MUSIC.

if you PM me i can write out a list of recommended funk/r&b stuff you should listen to.
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#13
Quote by rich2k4
think the best way to go about it is to start transcribing songs in each style.

i can't stress this enough

TRANSCRIBING IS THE KEY TO ALMOST ANYTHING REGARDING MUSIC.

if you PM me i can write out a list of recommended funk/r&b stuff you should listen to.


And that's exactly one of the "hardships" of learning flamenco, it isn't supposed to be written down. That of course doesn't mean that there's nothing on the net, there's plenty in fact. But unless you know what to look for you'll end up with stuff like Asturias, wich is miles and miles from real flamenco.
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
UG's Flamenco Club