#1
Hokay; I'm in the process of learning music theory and I was reviewing intervals. So I have a question concerning them.

Is this correct? (If not please spot my error)

1/2 step always equals a minor second. A to A# is always a minor second. (Seems logical)

What about B to C? Because B to C is a half step, is B to C always a minor second?


So in triads, the major triad is 1-3-5. 1-3 is a major 3rd; 3-5 is a minor 3rd. Does this mean that in the C major triad (C, E, G) that E to G is always a minor 3rd, regardless of the scale?

Thanks in advance; just trying to clear things up.
#2
B to C in the same octave is always a minor second, while B to C in the next octave is a major seventh.
Tiger style.
#3
Yes. 1 semitone = interval of a b2. 3 semitones = interval of a minor third. You can say that G is a minor third above E. When you're in the key of E minor, you can call it a diatonic third; when you're in E major you would call it a minor third, as the diatonic third in E, from E, is G#.
#4
So when recognizing intervals, should I not choose to think of them as in scales?

For example, saying E to G# is a major 3rd is correct, but is it correct because G# is 4 semitones above E? Or is it correct because G# is the 3rd note in the E major scale?
#6
Quote by kevinm4435
B to C in the same octave is always a minor second, while B to C in the next octave is a major seventh.


No, B to A# is a major 7th. B to C an octave above is a b9.

TS, I think it's much easier to think about intervals in terms of scales. The best way to look at E to G# being is major 3rd is that G# is the 3rd note in the E Major scale.

(And just FYI, A to A# would not be a minor 2nd, but an augmented unison - but that's just nitpicking.)
Quote by guitar_god22

thats about south africa tho...which isnt poor at all.
Quote by RyanInChains9
yea venezula is just the richest country in the world...
#7
Quote by lemonsquares42
Hokay; I'm in the process of learning music theory and I was reviewing intervals. So I have a question concerning them.

Is this correct? (If not please spot my error)

1/2 step always equals a minor second. A to A# is always a minor second. (Seems logical)
It seems logical, but it's incorrect. A second always involves interval names moving from one letter-name to the next, in either direction, and regardless of the accidental applied. For example, these are all seconds: A to B, B to C#, C# to B, Cb to D#, etc.

Naming intervals requires that we identify both the quality (major, minor, diminished, doubly-diminished, etc.) and the size (9th, 11th, 4th, etc.)

In your example above, from an A to another A, regardless of the accidentals applied (a # in this case), represents a unison. For example, these are all unisons: Ab to A#, Abb to A##, A to Ab, etc.

Without flogging this to death, we call the interval created by the notes A and A# an augmented unison.

On the other hand, we call the interval created by the notes A and Bb (A#'s enharmonic) a minor second.

If this doesn't make sense to you, sit down with your teacher and have him or her explain it face-to-face. Good luck, and keep asking those questions!

gpb
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.