#1
..with notes for example,

instead of calling the 3rd fret of the E string.. "the 3rd fret", but a G
it sounds basic i know but ever since i've been playing it has been drilled into my brain how to find a specific note is to relate it to a fret, now i desperately break this habit and be able to point to any fret and say it's note

obviously i know the simple ones string notes (eg BEADG for my 5 string) and low down offen used roots such as G, C, and the 5th frets but as a general rule if somebody points to a note i have to look for those very patterns or count down/ up from the 5th fret if you get me?

i'm sure from your personal experience it greatly helps your music theory and notation?

thanks in advance bbz(es)
xxxxx
Quote by Metal-X
No.. you see when one person stays on UG for to long, then they tend to lose there minds to the Pit monkeys. And well..... just watch for yourself

#2
What I did was memorize the notes on the fret inlays, and everything is easy from there. I play a 5 string too, Its really not that hard, I learned the first 2 strings in one day.
#3
Yell all the notes out as loud as u can until u can memorize them
Quote by Damaged Roses
I don't really understand why basses have 24 frets, I mean, I've never seen a bassist playing more than the 12 fret.


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#4
I have that problem, and it's getting better. I think after a while of forcing yourself to think that way, it just happens. Well, that's what happened to me..
#5
I just had to repeat it over and over. It just gets drilled into your brain. Took me for-****ing-ever to learn high up on the fretboard though. I've recently been able to make note of patterns, such as 12th fret is the octave so the note before it must be F and things like that. I love that about bass (or all string instruments, really). It's all patterns.
#6
i got a picture of a fret board with all the letters on each fret and each string and used it as my desktop for a while, every day i would go over them all

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#7
Kill two birds with one stone:
When practising or learning scales try and refrain from using a box shape. Say you're doing C major. Take your lowest string and find all the notes from that scale on the fretboard. When you have all the spots memorized (shouldn't take long) then start playing the notes three at a time in one position and say the notes as you play them. go up and down. Each day do a new string.
Now for the important part. Anyone can say their alphabet forward and back from A to G with a couple of flats or sharps to remember right? Right! The next step is to play the scale in thirds up and down the first string. That is to say play the first note in the scale skip a note then go to the note you skipped then skip a note etc. Then play it in fourths (skip 2 notes go back to the first note you skipped then skip two etc.), fifths (3 notes back to first 3 etc.), and probably 5 is the highest interval that would be useful for you to go on this exercise.
Remember always say the note names (and if you want a real challenge match pitch as well) and take it slow. I'm talking one string per day on the same interval for 20 minutes. Do that with all your scales and in no time you'll have the fretboard memorized and be a better player than your average box-shaper to boot.
#8
I had 'em memorized pretty much the same day as I started playing.. I'm just good with remembering that sort of thing, especially with sound associated with it..

Not sightreading on the other hand.. well, I'm still not too good with that >.<
#9
cheers for the advice people, i have also recently bought hal leonard bass method complete edition for my music notation and general theory brush up anyone got / heard of? that book it was recommended by my teacher
Quote by Metal-X
No.. you see when one person stays on UG for to long, then they tend to lose there minds to the Pit monkeys. And well..... just watch for yourself

#10
I'm just gonna be checkin this thread out from time to time. I need the advice too, i just call them as frets.
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Originally posted by Civildp1
I can't drink tequila anymore. it makes me do terrible things. Terrible naked things.
#11
Quote by mong12345
cheers for the advice people, i have also recently bought hal leonard bass method complete edition for my music notation and general theory brush up anyone got / heard of? that book it was recommended by my teacher


Yes, it is fabulous except for one thing. When you get to sixteenth notes they rush you along too much and it's very difficult to trudge through it.
#12
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Yes, it is fabulous except for one thing. When you get to sixteenth notes they rush you along too much and it's very difficult to trudge through it.


To expand on Jazz's post, Book one and two are the "here are the basics of bass playing and technique"

In Book Three (where you get to 16th and syncopation), its like they tried to cram as many advanced concepts into one book--it includes 16th, syncopated rhythms, slap/pop. dead notes etc and they all get only a 2 page or less treatment.
#14
Kill two birds at once and force yourself to learn a Rush song from standard sheet music alone. Self control works wonders
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Quote by Applehead
There are some things in life that are universally "good":

Sex, pizza, the smell of fresh washing and slap bass.
#15
wow, I'm browsing thru this thread and I can't believe so many of you memorized the notes by letter on the fretboard. I didn't learn that way at all, but I play and learn by ear. I look for the relationship between the position of one note and the next as I play and the overall position of the fret in relation to the inlays on the fretboard. I also memorized the frets involved in the various arpeggios and scales, so I can bust those out anywhere on the fretboard. IMO it is not necessary to memorize all the notes by letter, just know the basic theory and know how to figure it out when needed. When I first learned bass I drew out a note diagram and then scrapped it 2 minutes later. if someone points to a fret other than the first 3 lowest frets and asks "what is that?" I'm a total idiot and have to sit there and figure it out, but that doesn't matter because it doesn't interfere with my playing or learning speed at all, as a matter of fact it speeds it up because I think logistically by position. The only thing I'm screwed on is that I have to convert sheet music to tab - takes me forever to read sheet music.
#16
Hey, now what I did was just play chords of songs, and get to learn the notes, find an image of a bass fretboard and print it out. I'm still a beginner at bass, but I learned most of the notes quickly with that...
#17
5th fret is the note of the open string higher (in pitch) than the one you're on.
7th fret is the open note of the string lower.
12th is th sam as the open of the one your on.
anything above 5 you subtract 5 from and consult the next highest string i.e 9th fret of the E=4th fret of the A
anything above 12 subtract 12.
learn the first 5 frets of every string.
no sir away a papaya war is on