#1
this is my first post on this site

anyways im interested in home recording so maybe u guys can give me some tips on gear

do i want an analog recorder or a digital one, if i buy either one of these what else do i need, ive got a laptop, do i need mics? how does it work exactly? ive got audicity, will that do the trick, thanks for your help and info
#3
here's my recording rig:
Apple MacBook Pro - GarageBand
Line 6 Pod XTL
MXL USB Mic

I record guitar through the line 6 and it sounds amazing. I use garage band apple loops for drums and they sound real good, solid bass. i record bass guitar through the line 6, and vocals through the MXL connected directly to the Macbook pro. I can't play drums in my apartment but if i could record live drums i would get 2 more usb MXL's and try to find a USB kick drum mic. if you want to hear sound samples send me you e-mail and i'll send some over.
#4
You will need (bare minimum) the following:

- Shure SM57 mic ($80 usd)
- mixer ($200-$300 usd)
- A/D converter - Layla is a good small one ($200 or so)

If you're serious about it, you're in for at least $600 or $700, otherwise you're just wasting time and money.

The Shure 57 is a mic you will always use. Get a decent mixer, too, with more inputs and outputs than you need. You will probably need them later.

Go used. Forget Guitar Center. Try Craig's List (www.craigslist.com)
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#5
http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/en/72138

I use this. You get one mike, a mixing desk and some software to record with (albeit not very good software).

Basically, the setup goes

Mike----Mixing desk---Audio Interface---Computer USB socket.

The audio interface is what converts the sound into computer lingo, or binary.

P.S there's also a firewire version, can be found here:

http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/en/72139
Bit more expensive though.
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#6
Quote by Bubonic Chronic
You will need (bare minimum) the following:

- Shure SM57 mic ($80 usd)
- mixer ($200-$300 usd)
- A/D converter - Layla is a good small one ($200 or so)

If you're serious about it, you're in for at least $600 or $700, otherwise you're just wasting time and money.

The Shure 57 is a mic you will always use. Get a decent mixer, too, with more inputs and outputs than you need. You will probably need them later.

Go used. Forget Guitar Center. Try Craig's List (www.craigslist.com)


Completely unnecessary for home recording.
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#8
What will you be recording?

Using your computer is probably the best idea if it's halfway decent.
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Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#9
The "recorder" is the whole lot...

Mike - picks up the sound and sends it to...
Mixer - Adjusts volums, EQ clipping, and sends it to...
Audio Interface - Converts it to binary and sends it to...
Software - Saves it, edits it, whatever else you want to do with it.
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#10
Quote by bartdevil_metal
The "recorder" is the whole lot...

Mike - picks up the sound and sends it to...
Mixer - Adjusts volums, EQ clipping, and sends it to...
Audio Interface - Converts it to binary and sends it to...
Software - Saves it, edits it, whatever else you want to do with it.

ok so the recorder is all that stuff built in?......ok well i dont have any recording gear, so what shoud i buy first to get started?
I hate my sig
Last edited by QuantumMechanix at Oct 2, 2007,
#11
No, they're seperate bits of equipment. The effect of all of them working together is the recording.

And look at my link in the first post I made in this thread, that is probably the best value recording setup money can buy.
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#13
No problemo. Recording can be hard to get started with because the market is flooded with high-end professional quality products. All you really need to record is a USB mike and a pc but a mixer makes things so much easier to adjust. And if you're not sure how to use anything or what any piece of recording equipment does, PM me anytime.
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#14
Quote by FacingUsAll
What will you be recording?


Answer please.
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Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#18
There are two routes you can go for home recording on a computer. Soundcard + mixer, or mixerless. Mixerless is probably a better idea for you. All you need is an interface (firewire or USB) and a mic.
#19
Does your computer have a firewire port?
Recognized by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2008
Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
Last edited by FacingUsAll at Oct 2, 2007,
#20
Quote by FacingUsAll
Does your computer have a firewire interface?

Computers don't come with firewire interfaces. I believe you're referring to firewire ports.
#21
Well, in that case you'll need more mikes. And a mixer.

TBH, you're better off multitracking every part seperatley. You get less overspill, and a better quality recording.
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#22
Quote by electrik
Computers don't come with firewire interfaces. I believe you're referring to firewire ports.


Yeah I just edited it when I reread the sentence .
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Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#23
idk anything about firewire...i have a USB tho...man this is like...a lot of money. how many mics?
I hate my sig
Last edited by QuantumMechanix at Oct 2, 2007,
#24
Well, get a USB recording setup. Firewire's like a faster version of USB. Apple Macs have it as standard most of the time, its possible for PCs to have it.

For a band of drums, bass and guitar you're looking at minimum of three, preferably four mikes.

If I were you, I would mike it like this:

Mike 1: Guitar Amp
Mike 2: Bass Amp
Mike 3: Bass Drum
Mike 4: Over head Drums (Just in the air above the Drumkit)

Alternatively if this looks like too much money, with a mixing desk you can use direct input, which means you can literally plug your guitar into you amp and use another jack lead that goes from the recording out/headphones socket on your amp directly into the mixing desk. You don't get as good a sound, and this means that there is no sound coming out of your amp, but its significantly cheaper (and its still possible to get a decent sound).

You WILL have to mike the drum kit unless its an electric one. There is no other way to record a conventional drumkit.
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Last edited by bartdevil_metal at Oct 2, 2007,
#26
Quote by QuantumMechanix
idk anything about firewire...i have a USB tho


You'll most likely want to get a mixer with firewire so you can edit individual tracks. You can get Firewire -> USB converters, although you might suffer some latency.

I'm currently looking to get a Phonic Helixboard.

You're going to want a condenser mic for vocals and/or acoustic guitars.
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Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#28
Quote by QuantumMechanix
sorry for all the questions, but whats a condenser mic...dif from a normal mic?


There's some weird technical explanation, but basically it's a mic that needs 48v phantom power to work and is better at picking up subtleties (aka has more clarity).
Recognized by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2008
Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#30
Keep in mind that contrary to popular belief, a Sm57 is not always a good solution for micing your cab. It depends alot on your preamps, room, guitar, amp, speakers, etc. Sometimes a large diaphragm condenser will do far better than a 57 and vice verse. As far as mics go, at least try to get 1 good dynamic (Sm57) and 1 good LDC. That shoul have you set for guitar and vocals.
#31
Quote by FacingUsAll
There's some weird technical explanation, but basically it's a mic that needs 48v phantom power to work and is better at picking up subtleties (aka has more clarity).

for vocals im assuming?
I hate my sig
#32
I think if I was solely recording guitar amps, I'd get a Sennheiser E609 instead of an SM57.

Quote by QuantumMechanix
for vocals im assuming?


For recording vocals, acoustic guitars, and overhead drum mics usually.
Recognized by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2008
Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#37
Pounds, but I take your point. And ofc I'm from UK look at my location...

Try musicians friend or whatever else you yanks use then..
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#39
Quote by QuantumMechanix
ok...is facingusall still on? he's a fellow "yank"




Not a bad combo.

I have the vocal one.
Recognized by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2008
Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
Last edited by FacingUsAll at Oct 2, 2007,
#40
looks good ill check it out. i have a mic but its not a condenser.....what is that used for?
I hate my sig