#1
What are ohms and why is the less, the better? I'm looking at bass amps, and it seems the cheaper ones are at 8ohms while the more pricey ones are at 4 ohms, do they go lower? and what are they?
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#2
Ohms is a measure of electrical resistance. Lower resistance = higher watts.

It can be thought of as a measure of efficiency. A soda can might have a resistance of 50 ohms. A length of lead pipe, 10 ohms. Aluminum wire, 2 ohms.

The better conductor you've got the lower the resistance.

In terms of bass amps, 4 ohms is twice as powerful as 8 ohms. 2ohms is twice as powerful as 4 ohms.

It can drive a bigger load of speakers. More boom.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#4
ohms is the unit of electrical resistance

ohm=Voltage/amp

lower ohms mean more amps per volt, which creates more of a "punch" and volume.
#5
Hows Does I Gets 1 Ohm?
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#6
Is there a way to lower ohms with an amp?
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#7
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
Is there a way to lower ohms with an amp?

dont quote me on this but i dont think you can get a one ohm
#8
0.0004 Ohms?
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#9
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
0.0004 Ohms?

i think one gets that by rubbing his/her feet on the carpet and shocking his/her dog in the face.
my gear:
Jackson DKMG(the one with EMG 81/85's)
b-52 AT 212 100 watt amp
old gear i'll probably sell eventually:
yamaha beginners guitar
gunmetal grey Fender squire strat
Fender 65R amp
#10
why is a 2 ohm load better than a 4 ohm load? it isnt unless your output resistance is 2 ohms. matching your load impedance with your line impedance gives you the most power to your load. basicly, dont just go hooking up a 2 ohm cab to a 4 ohm head thinking it will get you more power.

now, why is 2 ohm head possibly better than a 4 ohm head? well if you have the same voltage drop across the circuit impedance,then you get a higher current with a lower impedance. and since power = R*I^2, you get more power when you up the current and lower the impedance.

so what does all this mean? basicly, just match the head and cab impedances and you will be good to go.
#11
Quote by Bubonic Chronic
Ohms is a measure of electrical resistance. Lower resistance = higher watts.

It can be thought of as a measure of efficiency.
Two things wrong with this statement. First lower resistance doesn't .always = higher watts. Second, it cannot be thought of as a measure of efficiency. The first statement is true. Ohms is a measure of resistance. Something can have high ohms (impedance) and be *more* efficient than a lower ohm circuit. Ohms establishes the relationship between voltage and current. You will frequently see amps that will give a higher output on 4 ohms than 8 ohms. So in that case you get more power from the lower impedance. Go any lower and all you might get is smoke.

The relationship between ohms and power is a function of the design. You never (ok rarely, i haven't) see an amp designed for 1 ohm. Tube amps generally have a specific ohm rating and you should stick to it. It delivers the maximum power that the design will allow and that is not limited by the ohms of the speaker.

If you want to get the maximum power then buy the right piece of equipment and put the right load on it. It's as simple as that. There is no magic bullet for getting more power by lowering the ohms.