#5
Eh?
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#7
I'm pretty sure states. I mean, I can't think of any jurisdictions any larger than that. Last I check the Midwest isn't a political jurisdiction. No real voting occurs on a scale larger than state. Of course, I'm not a big one on civics, so I could be totally wrong here.
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#8
Quote by AngusX
I'm pretty sure states. I mean, I can't think of any jurisdictions any larger than that. Last I check the Midwest isn't a political jurisdiction. No real voting occurs on a scale larger than state. Of course, I'm not a big one on civics, so I could be totally wrong here.


I see what you mean but specifically the assignment asks to list the 57 largest political jurisdictions...so...
#9
Quote by metaldud536
I see what you mean but specifically the assignment asks to list the 57 largest political jurisdictions...so...

Wouldn't they be listed in your text book?
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#12
I think the most amazing thing about civics is how hopelessly useless it is when people enter that place high school pretends doesn't exist, called the real world. A world where your knowledge and abilities of one specific subject will bring home the bacon, not where a general knowledge of several subjects, with a bit more specific knowledge in one area prevails. That's the huge flaw in school systems, we force students to study in areas that do not interest them, and aren't applicable to what they want to do in life. Then, they get sick of it, hate school, drop out, and flip burgers for a living. A system designed to fail.
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#14
Quote by AngusX
I think the most amazing thing about civics is how hopelessly useless it is when people enter that place high school pretends doesn't exist, called the real world. A world where your knowledge and abilities of one specific subject will bring home the bacon, not where a general knowledge of several subjects, with a bit more specific knowledge in one area prevails. That's the huge flaw in school systems, we force students to study in areas that do not interest them, and aren't applicable to what they want to do in life. Then, they get sick of it, hate school, drop out, and flip burgers for a living. A system designed to fail.

I see what you mean, but this is done in high school so that students will have a well rounded basic knowledge in several areas that are believed to be crucial in the outside world. U mention that knowledge in one general area is what determines success, and that is why we go to college where we can choose our area of study.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#15
No, there's no difference. To me, college has been a regression, I'm actually more in middle school. On the plus side, Tetris has been given a good workout. Too bad calculators aren't allowed in all of my classes...

I guess in your friends case civics is somewhat useful. I always forget about law degrees. Stupid engineering.
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#16
Quote by evening_crow
I see what you mean, but this is done in high school so that students will have a well rounded basic knowledge in several areas that are believed to be crucial in the outside world. U mention that knowledge in one general area is what determines success, and that is why we go to college where we can choose our area of study.


Yeah, I can kinda see where they are coming from, but I feel they are really cutting people's legs out from underneath them more than they give them a ladder to climb. This may be why American schools don't rank as well, they try to make students too well-rounded (I know German schools place students into classes relevant to their abilities and interests, at least, according to our exchange students). I dunno, I just felt like ranting because I don't want to type up my lab report.
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#17
Quote by AngusX
Yeah, I can kinda see where they are coming from, but I feel they are really cutting people's legs out from underneath them more than they give them a ladder to climb. This may be why American schools don't rank as well, they try to make students too well-rounded (I know German schools place students into classes relevant to their abilities and interests, at least, according to our exchange students). I dunno, I just felt like ranting because I don't want to type up my lab report.


I wish I was placed in nothing but art classes in highschool.